By on November 28, 2012

Despite embargoes keeping things under wraps, journalists found another way to break this bit of information early; by going to the display stand and looking at the information.

And that’s how we confirmed that the 2.2L Skyactiv diesel engine will power the 2014 Mazda6. With 173 horspower and 310 lb-ft, the oil burning Mazda should be an interesting alternative to the VW Passat TDI. And apparently, you can get it with a manual as well.

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95 Comments on “2014 Mazda6 Gets Skyactiv Diesel: 2012 Los Angeles Auto Show...”


  • avatar
    jkross22

    Shut the front door!

    I”ll believe it when I see it – on 12/9.

  • avatar
    Skink

    AWD and I’ll buy one.

  • avatar
    stryker1

    “With 173 horspower and 310 lb-ft…”

    Does it cure cancer too? Seriously. If that’s true, and there’s any kind of gas mileage, I will sell my Golf and line up.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      I’m trying to be objective, and check any fanbois-ism at the door, but I maintain that anyone who is counting Mazda out will just plain be wrong.

      I honestly believe, having driven quite a few makes/models of cars, that Mazda is currently the most underrated and undervalued automotive manufacturer based on their product line and engineering/design capabilities.

      They do have some duds, such as the Mazda 2 (IMO), but the rest of their lineup is solid, and their new motors that push efficiency further without that much of a performance ding will undoubtedly help them sell more vehicles.

      Their reliability is excellent, their interiors are at least close to best in class all things being equal (i.e. price), and they are better than most at striking that difficult balance between driving dynamics and comfort.

      The USD and Euro vs Yen exchange rate has hurt them given that their production is almost exclusively in Japan, but they are implementing plans to manufacturer abroad in large volume, including North America.

      Just my opinions. Feel free to rip them apart.

      • 0 avatar
        mike978

        DW – I completely agree, they are under-rated and I find it surprising especially amongst the pro Toyota and Honda crowd who then seem to dismiss Mazda. Even though Mazda are comparable in reliability but better in driving dynamics. I am glad their styling is much improved which will certainly help (as it did for Hyundai)

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        I really don’t get it. Toyota did improve the interior materials of the new Camry versus the last gen, but that’s not saying that much, really. At heart, Toyota still is the poster child of automotive vanilla, and they have a few really bad offerings that fail miserably at the level.

        Honda still offers reliable vehicles, but they’re less comfortable than some Toyotas, for the mainstream buyer.

        Mazda strikes a much better balance than either Toyota or Honda, at least for the car buyer who still has at least a passing interest in the way a car’s steering wheel feels at speed, how it takes corners, and how the suspension dynamics, motor, gauges and overall experience increases the “driveability” enjoyment factor, and now they equal both Honda & Toyota in reliability.

        Mazda is far more successful in terms of % market share and attracting an enthusiastic, core devotee base in places such as Canada, the U.K, Australia and South Africa, as just some examples, than they are in the U.S.

        Is it marketing failure?

      • 0 avatar
        thehomelessguy

        I thought Mazda’s had rust issues after 4-5 years or so (right after the warranty runs out). Is this not true? Then again, while I haven’t had any rust at all with my VW (it’s a 2000), it’s had a number of mechanical issues. So not sure which would be worse.

      • 0 avatar
        Carrera

        I think you’re right on DW. I am a Honda fanboy, but this could be my next ride…unless some horrible failures occur with this diesel engine. I do think that Mazda either has a dealer problem or some sort of marketing problem…although the zoom-zoom commercials are everywhere. From all the Mazda’s that I have been in ( Mazda 3, Mazda 6) their interior materials seemed to be a lower quality than their Honda counterparts…not much though and not enough to keep me from buying a diesel one.

      • 0 avatar
        duffman13

        DW,

        Count me in on your opinion. I’m biased, I love my wife’s 3, and look forward to the day it becomes my DD. I don’t see them as skimping on the interiors either, epsecially in class for the C-segment. I’ve been in rentals of most of the competition and I prefer our 3 to just about all of them.

        I think price is their biggest problem, but they’ve been doing 0%/60 months intermittently to full time for at least the last 2.5 years, which actually puts them ahead of most of the competition payment-wise if you can afford to buy.

        I think their biggest problem falls into the sales/marketing category, and the fact that they have not shared the mainstream success and goodwill that Toyota and Honda have had over the past 2 decades. Thinking to the late 90s, mazdas never really had a market perception as being super-reliable, and did feel inferior to most of their honda and toyota counterparts (except the Corolla, I’ve always hated those, AE86 nonwithstanding).

      • 0 avatar
        200k-min

        My complaint about Mazda has been their “tinny” cheap feel. Slam the door shut on a 6 compared to an Accord or Camry. The Camcords just feel more solid. Maybe it’s perception but that rock solid flawless “feel” sells an awful lot of Lexus even if the vehicle is “vanilla.”

        Granted the Mazda products are generally enjoyable to drive but so are most all of the new Ford products. Between a Mazda 3 and a Focus I’d go with Ford. I’d cross shop a diesel Mazda 6 with a Fusion Hybrid – not a Passat diesel.

    • 0 avatar
      tresmonos

      DW:
      I believe it is a marketing failure and a sign that Gen Y’ers are complacent about automobiles.

      I got my father to shop Mazda for his most recent car purchase. He bought a CX-7, but his demographic wasn’t the true target of the vehicle. Reason why I say this is because of his only hang-up with the vehicle: the ride is too stiff. He likes everything else about it, but wouldn’t have purchased that had he known how bad this car was for his back.

      Personally, I loved his choice of vehicle. The only thing I dislike about it is the fit and finish of the interior. I’m a picky bastard when it comes to A pillar fits, headliner cuts, IP location/fit, stupid little things that most people don’t see and that CX-7 is full of issues that I pick apart. Would it stop me from buying it? No – because the damned thing has no NVH issues or S&R’s after 70k.

      Mazda is primed for the younger market – if Gen Y’ers actually gave a crap about what they drive. They have an incredible opportunity ahead of them if the NA economy thrives and my generation doesn’t turn out to be completely worthless.

  • avatar
    scrappy17

    Obligatory ” Where is the brown wagon?”

    Does anybody know if it requires the Urea Injection junk like the Merc and BMW diesels?

    If it is simple to get rid of the emissions crap with kits like those available for the Ford and Duramax diesels, sign me up for two!

    • 0 avatar
      Spanish Inquisition

      As I recall, the Skyactiv-D doesn’t require urea injection.

      • 0 avatar
        th009

        Really, it all depends on the baseline NOx emissions, which in turn depend on the engine and the (curb weight of the) car. VW’s current TDI engine doesn’t need urea in the Golf but would in the Tiguan. Given the weight of the Mazda6 and a 2.2L engine, my bets are on urea injection.

      • 0 avatar
        Pagani Baguette

        It would be interesting to see if they can get away with no urea… on the other hand, VW had to go with urea on the Passat while virtually the same engine (it is not exactly the same) needs no urea on the Golf/Jetta. However, for complex reasons (let’s not derail this thread) the urea injection allows for better fuel economy and there are people in the Passats that are getting some outstanding mileage. rumors are, the next Golf/Jetta TDI power plant will get the urea injection, so they can improve mileage. It is not super big deal to fill up a small tank with something, once every 15.000 miles. Especially if that allows you to get greater mileage and also helps to eliminate other anti-pollution equipment from the car.

      • 0 avatar
        L'avventura

        According to C&D, no urea injection is needed:
        http://www.caranddriver.com/news/mazda-skyactiv-g-and-skyactiv-d-engines-news

        “The 2.2-liter Sky-D (again, other sizes are likely to follow) boosts fuel economy by 20 percent over the current, 2.2-liter diesel and meets Euro 6 and U.S. Tier 2 Bin 5 emissions standards without using any NOx aftertreatment such as urea injection. “

      • 0 avatar
        joeveto3

        Don’t most diesel owners (whose cars require urea) just pee in their urea tanks? Not that big of a deal from what I can tell.

      • 0 avatar
        Pagani Baguette

        Good to know! If they can get this to work with no urea AND can make it 45 mpg average in the size (weight), at prices between the Jetta and Passat – it will be really, REALLY great!

        In Europe, the Mazda 6 2.2 Diesel with the “old” 163 HP engine (current engine on sale) is rated 43.5 MPG combined (US, not Imperial!). And they are talking about the SkyActiv is going to be better in fuel economy, so there are chances this new engine will do absolutely great without the urea.

        Also the current 2.2 Diesel has timing chain which I would personally prefer than the timing belt in the Passat TDI.

    • 0 avatar
      Mrb00st

      “Don’t most diesel owners (whose cars require urea) just pee in their urea tanks? Not that big of a deal from what I can tell.”

      Umm, I don’t think so. But I did literally laugh out loud at that.

      • 0 avatar
        blowfish

        i take your mileage will vary as how much starbucks u had consumed too.

        is nice to have a few more oel burners coming to the party.

        whilst toyondanissan didn’t have the chutz pah to bring any here.

        jags have TDI’s too but only selling them in old blighty at present.

        what kind of torque the mercs put out? 200 + hp probably the torque is not much off.
        the mazda definitely has more HP as compare to a V6 3litre merc dsl blutec.

  • avatar
    mike978

    Will this be filling in as the performance model since there is no V6. Or is the turbo from the CX9 likely to find its way to the 6?
    Would like to hear mileage since diesel is 20% more expensive in my area at the moment ($4.00 vs $3.30).

  • avatar
    burgersandbeer

    Pricing would be good to know too. This sounds promising though.

    I’m having a hard time picturing delivering 310 lb-ft of torque to the front wheels though. Is it something about the power delivery of a diesel that makes this more manageable?

  • avatar

    Cue the enthusiast applause!

    They will be lucky to sell 1000 of these. People in America want cars that are ‘grounded to the ground.’

    • 0 avatar
      Pagani Baguette

      The Passat TDI is selling beyond anyone’s expectations, so maybe they will get some luck…

    • 0 avatar
      rwb

      Those ads make me genuinely sick to my stomach.

      It’s one thing to want to leave the impression that it’s a real customer endorsing the product, but deliberately choosing the least articulate people you can find is a little revealing of the assumptions about your customer base.

      • 0 avatar
        cwallace

        Roger that– I don’t know which is worse, the bald guy effusing about his zippy hybrid or the other fellow talking about “stuff that guys like” as his wife drives him around while he stares catatonic out the side window. Toyota must know that men who wear the pants in their house generally don’t want Camrys anyway.

      • 0 avatar
        raded

        “Roger that– I don’t know which is worse, the bald guy effusing about his zippy hybrid or the other fellow talking about “stuff that guys like” as his wife drives him around while he stares catatonic out the side window. Toyota must know that men who wear the pants in their house generally don’t want Camrys anyway.”

        Whole thing made me laugh. So true.

      • 0 avatar
        Marko

        “Camry Effect” always makes me laugh.

        “Ask your dealer about Camry. Side effects may include dizziness, drowsiness, nausea…”

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        @Cwallace summed the Toyota commercial up perfectly!

    • 0 avatar
      icemilkcoffee

      VW sells 6-7000 TDI Jettas and Passats every single month. That is with the legendary VW reliability.

      Also- the Mazda6 only sold at around 3000 a month back in 2010 and 2011 (it’s selling far fewer now because of the anticipated replacement). So an increase of 1000 would be a decent 33% increase in volume.

      • 0 avatar
        redav

        “Also- the Mazda6 only sold at around 3000 a month back in 2010 and 2011 (it’s selling far fewer now because of the anticipated replacement). So an increase of 1000 would be a decent 33% increase in volume.”

        - And they stopped production about 4 months ago, so they are simply clearing out inventory without getting replacements.

    • 0 avatar
      kvndoom

      If they sell 1000 they’ll still beat the RLX, so it’s not all bad.

    • 0 avatar
      scrappy17

      I see what you did there!
      That ad annoys the crap out of me.

    • 0 avatar
      Brian P

      I would wager that there are a fair number of folks who like the idea of a mid-size car with a diesel engine, but without having to deal with VWoA’s “blame the customer for all that ails” antics. I have a VW diesel that is getting to be a hi-miler, but I won’t buy a current one.

      I wonder if Mazda is using a Bosch CP4.1 high-pressure fuel pump (HPFP), and I wonder what the maximum injection pressure is … ? ? ?

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    An interesting development. The 6 was already sold like a niche sedan and now they are putting a niche engine into it. Curious of what their sales projections are for this.

    Those power figures put the VW TDI to absolute shame. If the mileage is similar I would see little reason to get a Passat.

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      Something like 80% of all CX-5s sold in Japan had the diesel, even with 3 mo wait lists. And Japan isn’t even a diesel hotbed like Europe. I think it will do just fine. Even if diesel is more expensive, its improved efficiency makes that a wash, and its improved driveability gives it the win.

      In fact, you could say that being a niche player without a niche product is far worse than being a niche player with a niche product. At least now they have a reason for people to consider them.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    Mmm torque.

    The success of the diesel option in this car will depend on price. There’s a reason we’re only seeing “premium” priced diesels in cars thus far, hopefully they can bring it to market with minimal emissions non-sense.

  • avatar
    icemilkcoffee

    Praaaaaaise Jeeeesus! Ya just can’t argue with 310ft/lb of torque!

  • avatar
    Conslaw

    Nice. If I had a long commute, this car would be on my short list.

  • avatar
    dolorean

    One step closer to my automotive nirvana!! A six speed manual Mazda 6 diesel wagon or, dare I say it?, the return of the five-door hatch!!!

  • avatar
    Stephen82

    Dear Santa,

    I want a Mazda 6 Skyactiv Wagon some day which will completely eliminate my desire for a VW. Please and thank you.

  • avatar
    Tinn-Can

    So this would be a mid 2013 release? I have 7ish moths to pinch pennies? I wasn’t sure the normal one would be awesome enough to get me off my paid for mazda3 hatch, but this could tilt the scale over a little more. Hope it comes in brown…

  • avatar
    Astigmatism

    Dear Mazda: Please put this in the CX-5, like, tomorrow, and I guaranty you at least one sale. I already have a sedan for myself, but my wife is likely to need a larger vehicle for field work, has to make frequent 400-mile round-trips in addition to a modest commute, cares about mileage, and hates wagons. I couldn’t think of a more perfect vehicle for that situation.

    • 0 avatar
      jaje

      I think this is in the cards as well for the CX-5 (at least according to the GM at my local dealer).

    • 0 avatar
      KixStart

      Astigmatism: “Please put this in the CX-5…”

      I was thinking along similar lines. Except I’ve already bought my car for the next decade. If this had been available in the CX-5 four months ago…

      I think it might sell well in the CX-5. It would certainly be unique and it might give the CX-5 the extra pep that some people think it needs.

      However, further up a poster pointed out that the diesels are going into the premium vehicles. If I was in the market and Mazda put the diesl, as a reasonably priced option, into the Touring (middle) version, I’d consider it. If it was Grand Touring only… forget it.

      • 0 avatar
        Astigmatism

        Just for sh!ts and giggles, I optioned out a diesel CX-5 Grand Touring on mazda.de, and ended up at about 39k euros. Youch.

        Make mine a touring AWD for $30k and I’m so there.

  • avatar
    SOneThreeCoupe

    As I’ve said before:

    Gimme a two-door 2 with a fun diesel.

  • avatar
    pg123456789

    Thank you Mazda! Please put the diesel and manual transmission options across the range. We desperately need an alternative to VWs (who have been cornering the value end of the market). Diesels are so much better for most of the non-city driving that we do in the USA.

  • avatar
    jaje

    So excited about this news.

  • avatar
    SqueakyVue

    I really Really REALLY want to buy this. I hope it sells well and they bring back the wagon. My 04 mazda6 wagon was such a dream to drive, even with fords dated 3.0 it was a very smooth, well handling station wagon.

    • 0 avatar
      BigDuke6

      I believe Mazda Canada has already said they have no plans to bring the wagon here. I’m with Squeaky….I love my Mazda wagon, and the only problem with the 3.0 Duratec is that it likes gasoline. The best mileage I’ve ever recorded was 30 mpg. And that’s 90% highway, keeping her on the cruise at 115 km/h. I can’t understand why Mazda doesn’t see a market here. Oh wait a minute, it’s because of buddy’s wife who “doesn’t like wagons”……. But she’ll drive an SUV, or CUV, or whatever they want to market a wagon with big wheels as.

      • 0 avatar
        redav

        Sales figures for midsize wagons basically suck in NA. And frankly, there’s no reason for most people to want a wagon over a CUV.

      • 0 avatar
        Luke42

        @redav: Efficiency.

        But the wagon has to deliver.

      • 0 avatar
        redav

        Americans have proven time and again that they really don’t care about efficiency.

      • 0 avatar
        Luke42

        @redav: Tell that to the three million or so Prius owners and see what they have to say.

        The Prius is a great little passenger car, but people who care about efficiency have the same variety of needs as everyone else.

        BTW, the consumer behavior atudies that I’ve been hearing about lately say that most American car buyers say MPG is one of the top features theyre looking for in a car, but what they mean is efficiency within the segment. So, the typical consumer will decide first that they need a large SUV, then they’ll go out and test-drive the most efficient one and decide whether or not to buy it.

        The problem, though, is that there is no car that’s really an upgrade from the Prius – at least if you evaluate cars in sich a way that you bought a Prius in the first place. But this car, along with some of the usual green-car suspects are suggesting that change will be here shortly and people like me will have choices!

      • 0 avatar
        WheelMcCoy

        @redav – “Americans have proven time and again that they really don’t care about efficiency.”

        Perhaps. But Americans have also proven time and again to be obsessed with power (and torque). Diesel can satisfy that lust.

        I have to hand it to Mazda. They are working hard, being innovative, and taking chances.

  • avatar
    Sgt Beavis

    WoW! Just Frackin’ WOW!!

  • avatar
    gslippy

    Great, only 34 months left on my Leaf lease.

    Seriously, it’s about time a serious competitor arose to challenge VW’s stranglehold on the diesel cult market.

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    Diesels in small cars are pointless in the US. Put one in a 1/2 ton truck or SUV where i can use that torque for towing and the fuel economy over gas is actually worthwhile and then you got something.

    • 0 avatar

      Yea Diesel. The current car selection is VW TDi, very nice inside for the Golf but kinda harsh for Jetta (and we do notice the solid rear axle, VW marketers), the 335d, expensive and out of production (but a sweet car…drove the version with the M Sport package…58k…D’0h !) and the Mercedes E class, also expensive.

      There’s no reason we don’t have diesel all through the lineup.

      A lot is said about fuel prices. I don’t get diesel pricing. Sometimes it’s 20 cents less than premium. Other times it is 40 cents more. Usually it is about the same…there’s more variance than gas prices. When I was in Germany, Diesel was the same price as regular.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      You can’t sell me a full sized pickup or SUV no matter how hard you try. Wrong tool for my circumstances.

      Small cars are great in the USA. At least for me. I don’t pretend to understand your needs the way you pretend to understand mine…

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        Your missing my point. The US isn’t Europe. Diesel costs more than gas and emissions are tighter which lowers their fuel economy. Then you have higher maintenance and repair costs plus the upfront cost. Most of the advantages diesels used to have over gas engines years ago are gone. In a large heavy vehicle that is possibly pulling a 5th wheel RV down the road the benefits of diesel can be realized. Not in a Mazda 6.

        If you want the novelty of having an oil burner under the hood, go for it. But don’ t kid yourself that it’s saving you bunch of money. There may be a small niche market where it could but for the other 99% most likely not.

      • 0 avatar
        tedward

        Carlson fan. Higher maintenance and repair costs? Definitely not. The TDI’s are only pricey b/c VW puts them out there with wet dual-clutch transmissions, get the manual, not a problem. The way to look at it is you are going to get above 40mpg all the time without the sucks-to-drive compromise of the hybrids (high torque all the time, not just hypothetically at unknown rpm’s in certain ideal conditions with crappy transmissions). Either way, and I don’t disagree that 10-15% isn’t enough to justify a purchase, the real savings is in resale/residual rate.

        If you must buy a car for various low-fuel use reasons, AND you also want to have fun, then they remain the only real option. I did it once, worked out very well for me, but I’m back to gas now b/c really, gas engines are a lot more fun on the shift it yourself side of things and money isn’t as tight. Once everyone starts selling these engines and resale values actually match gasoline cars, you will certainly be correct.

        Also, modern mid-sized sedans are pretty damn heavy and big. You can’t tell me that any of these pigs aren’t benefiting from 250+lb/ft numbers. You certainly aren’t going to achieve those numbers at these mileages any other way.

  • avatar
    Marko

    YES!!! You know, yes, a manual AWD wagon version of the 6 Diesel would be nice, but I’m happy they’re offering the diesel here at all, even if it is an automatic sedan. Great job Mazda!

  • avatar
    goacom

    It does not require urea injection because of its very low compression ratio of around 14:1. This is almost gasoline level like. Low compression ratios = lower operating temperatures, which reduces the energy available for the oxidation of N2 to NOx’s. I don’t know how they can operate at such low compression ratios and still get reliable ignition.
    http://www.mazda.com/mazdaspirit/skyactiv/engine/skyactiv-d.html

    • 0 avatar
      Pagani Baguette

      Very advanced injection timing and a very unique opening of the exhaust valve during the intake cycle, this way some of the exhaust gases get back in the cylinder, bringing in heat, so the per-injection temperature is as high as in a conventional high compression ratio diesel…and probably another 100 small tricks which we will find out as the engine gets more popular.

    • 0 avatar
      BigDuke6

      WHOA…..is that a typing error on your part? A compression ratio of 14:1 is NOT very low. It is VERY high. Where would you buy gasoline for an engine with that comp. ratio? Oh, I know: go to your local drag strip and see what a gasoline with an octane rating that would support that, would cost.

      • 0 avatar
        Pagani Baguette

        bigDuke – for a diesel engine the ratio 14:1 is very low! actually it may be the record low in the world of production engines!

      • 0 avatar
        karlbonde

        Diesels usually have around 22:1 or so (naturally aspirated).

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        14:1 is about what new direct-injection gasoline engines are running on good fuel (Mazda had to detune the Sky-G engine to 13:1 for US 87 octane swill). 14:1 is very low for a diesel, but that means Mazda can use the same short block for both the gas and diesel engines.

      • 0 avatar
        Pagani Baguette

        bumpy – the CX-5 uses the 13:1 compression ratio (detuned for 87 octane), but the Mazda3 uses 12:1 compression ratio. Which is still mind blowing.

      • 0 avatar
        tedward

        pagani has it right. 13.whatever is creepy low for a modern DI diesel. 16+.1 is the usual. It might possibly even rev a bit, which would make it the clear driver’s choice of the limited other (ummm 1) options we have. Here’s hoping it isn’t super laggy or burdened with some other flaw as a result.

        Their 12.1 sky-active is similarly high for a gas engine, especially if you factor in drive-train purchase prices. I’m 99% the engines share a ton of parts so this is Mazda’s geeky, engine-centric, take on platform sharing. I love it.

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        The Sky-G in the current 3 was bumped down to 12:1 since the engine bay didn’t have enough space for the long-runner exhaust manifold. The CX-5 and new 6 were designed to have enough room, so they get the 13:1 version. Presumably the next 3 will also have it.

  • avatar
    tresmonos

    Sweet. Jesus.

    Right when Ford dumps their relationship and S-plan, this comes out. The consumer wins: high efficiency, low heat, high torque, no urea (if that’s true) and a standard transmission. Mazda is blessing us with the most interesting and reliable vehicle since the Merc W123.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      I don’t own a VW diesel, but have read that some are not pleased with various issues relating to adblue (?) [urea tanks; spillage, corrosive to paint, metal- crystals forming in area adjacent to storage tanks].

      However, I’m not really familiar with Mazda’s track record with diesel motors. I thought that Subaru didn’t have the most ideal diesels in passenger cars as judged by Europeans, but again, am not certain.

      Does anyone know Mazda’s reputation for diesel in such applications?

      • 0 avatar
        tresmonos

        I know Mazda supplied a diesel for ’84 Tempo/Topaz’s. The same mill was used in a Isuzu Grand Vitara all the way until 2003 in a Kia Sportage.

        I have heard it was reliable but had a head scratching, complex design with two timing belts. One for the fuel pump and one for the cams – on opposite sides of the bank.

        The ONLY reason I know this is I have the ‘other’ diesel Ford sourced in 1984 (but from BMW) in my project car. Main issue with the Mazda motor was the cylinder head cracking. This was also common on the Nissan and Toyota small diesel mills at the time (as well as my BMW/Steyr/Pusch M21, but mine would crack due to limping home with a thrown V belt for the water pump).

        I wouldn’t shy away from it due to selective catalytic reduction. That’s just the new necessary evil to operate an oil burner.

      • 0 avatar
        Pagani Baguette

        Mazda’s diesel engines is as hit or miss as the rest. You can go read some UK forums and will find out some people hate their 2.2L Diesel Mazda and some love them. Those with problems usually post more often and those with no problems just drive their cars and don’t post at all :)

        Mazda’s reputation with diesels could be almost irrelevant because in the way I see it, everyone can get a hit or a miss. Look at VW – they do have long time of great diesel reputation across their entire line. In Europe the VW diesel have always been very highly regarded and yet the current 2.0L TDI sold in USA is making a lot of owners nervous with some of the HPFP. Some will say it is blown out of proportions, some will say it is not. You read around and make your own conclusions as I don’t want this thread to become a “war” about HPFP issues. But fact is some of them failed and so you could think “How can a company with such reputation in diesel engines as VW can allow such thing?” and yet it happened. They took a gamble on something, they lost, we pay. They took a gamble with the PD technology and while it worked, there was CR and it won, so they moved on. BluRay vs. HD. Regardless which one is better, one wins, the other one walk away. Only time will tell whether this specific diesel Mazda is bringing here is going to be good or bad, because it is just like the story about VW above – the SkyActiv Diesel is new and very different. It has tricks never seen before in a mass production engine, like the very low compression ratio, etc. I have been following the SkyActive program ever since got announced and in the beginning most places said “Ha, this is BS, it can never work!” and yet they did it. It is reality. The gasoline version of the SkyActiv was also hard to believe, with those 12:1 compression ratios running on 87 octane – no way, many said. Well, I put 10.000 miles on one and is still going and it actually delivers the advertised EPA mileage, so it is reality and it works. How is it going to age and what is going to be in the long run – I don’t know. So far it works exactly as advertised. I like to see the cup half full :)

        I chose to believe in Mazda. I like how they are trying to do new and interesting things and not just change metal sheet, add cup holders and call it a new car. So, personally I would like them to win, to survive, as they are giving us from time to time interesting and unique cars. When the Mazda6 Diesel comes out, I am going to get one and then drive it a lot and then we will see what happens. I guess my post did not really help you as I did not really answer your question on how much you can trust Mazda with their diesels, but I bet no one can give you definitive answer as it all depends on personal experiences. Like they say, your mileage may vary, and it is so true…. but give me few years and I will be able to tell you little bit more from personal experience :)

      • 0 avatar
        tresmonos

        Pagani Baguette:
        Couldn’t have said it better. I mostly wanted to say that the Mazda diesel mills of the 80′s and 90′s were very comparable to their competition.

    • 0 avatar
      Quack

      Well said sir. Well said.

      Wonder if they’ll do a 500E-esque Mazdaspeed version though :P

  • avatar
    don1967

    Dear Mazda,

    Congratulations on having the cojones to bring a diesel sedan to North America. Now take the next step and rate it to tow the family camper, as all cars used to do.

    Sincerely,

    20 million reluctant minivan/CUV owners

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      PS: Put it in the CX-5, offer AWD and the manual trans and I swear I’ll consider it officially a diesel, awd, manual trans wagon. Oh and I don’t trust VWs reliability but I trust yours.

      • 0 avatar
        Quack

        Amen to that! Although I’d consider it with an auto too. The manual diesel’s take rate would be virtually non-existent.

        Diesel auto in a CX-5 though would be a fantastic choice!

  • avatar
    lilpoindexter

    Even if it’s only a sedan (and not a wagon) If the back seat folds down, and my bicycle fits without taking it apart (like in my station wagon), I might just have to stop being such a cheapskate and get a new car…I DEFINITELY want an aftermarket exhaust so everyone knows I got a diesel.

  • avatar

    The 2014 Mazda6. With 173 horspower and 310 lb-ft, What will happen can’t say, so arrange the everything to Run!!!

  • avatar
    rockettoys

    Will the 2.0 or rumored 2.5 Skyactiv gas engines be available as well?

  • avatar
    duffman13

    shutupandtakemymoney.jpeg

    This is the best automotive news I have heard in a while. Depending on my commuting status in a couple years, I could very much see trading in my wife’s 3 for this rather than using it as a DD. After the pictures of the interior we saw a few weeks ago, I’m sold. Even in the lower trims with cloth, mazda interior choices have been nothing to scoff at in the latest generations.

  • avatar
    boxelder

    Signed in to my too-seldom-used TTAC account just to wish Mazda “Good Luck!” with the diesel. I would truly love to see them succeed with this initiative. Make mine a wagon with a manual please. I’d finally give up my 2002 WRX Sport Wagon for one of those…

  • avatar
    Ian Anderson

    Wonder if I can convince my uncle to take one of these over a new Jetta when his 2008′s (third) transmission grenades itself…

    Great news, this will definitely be another car I can look at in a few years.

  • avatar
    Quack

    TAKE MY MONEY!

    European reviewers and some of the American journalists who’ve sampled this engine have quite positive things to say.

    Plus, the output is much better than the Passat TDI’s which IMO is too low. Hopefully this will convince VW to offer the higher output version of the 2.0 TDI in North America.

    Sign me up for this beauty though!


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