By on November 29, 2012

Mazda is remedying the biggest complain regarding its wonderful CX-5 crossover; the lack of power. Starting next year, the 2014 CX-5 can be ordered with the new 2.5L Skyactiv engine offered in the new Mazda6.

While the base 2.0L is still available in Sport trim levels, the 2.5L will be available on Touring and Grand Touring trims, making 184 horsepower and 185 lb-ft of torque. Fuel economy is rated at 25/32 mpg for FWD models and 24/30 for AWD models. The 2.5L will not be available with a stick shift, but Mazda’s automatic in the Skyactiv is about as good as it gets anyways.

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37 Comments on “Mazda CX-5 Gets Power Boost: 2012 Los Angeles Auto Show...”


  • avatar

    For reference, the EPA mpg for the current 2.0 is 26/32 with FWD, 25/31 with AWD.

    • 0 avatar
      Chocolatedeath

      Losing one mpg city or city is a good trade off. This will most def place it in the upper decks of small CUV’s with CR..LOL.
      But seriously thats a good move by Mazda…Seems like they are making alot of them lately.

    • 0 avatar
      Thinkin...

      With three pedals the EPA numbers for the CX-5 with the 2.0 are 26/35. So for those that prefer to row-their-won, the highway hit would be noticeable.

      • 0 avatar
        burgersandbeer

        Looks like the 2.0/manual still has a reason to exist then.

        With such a small difference in fuel economy, it’s hard to imagine why Mazda would bother to assemble a CX-5 with the 2.0L and an auto. I guess it’s that important to offer as low a price point as possible with a transmission most potential customers can actually use?

  • avatar
    KalapanaBlack

    One wonders why this will be an option and not the standard engine available, if there is almost no impact to fuel economy.

    One also wonders if the Skyactiv-D will be offered as a cut-rate competitor to Audi’s newly Diesel-ized Q5.

    • 0 avatar

      My guess is that they’ll charge more for the 2.5. Keeping the 2.0 in the Sport will enable a lower price for the lowest trim while providing incentive for people to step up to the Touring.

      • 0 avatar
        KalapanaBlack

        Wasn’t there just something about Mazda wishing to be considered more premium..?

        Seems to me upping the available power, improving the driving experience (2.5 has more torque thus less buzzy revving during operation than the 2.0), and marketing to US consumers who still equate more power with more premium cars, all while pulling in basically the same EPA numbers is a no-brainer.

      • 0 avatar
        redav

        Best guess estimates are that they will add $1500 for the 2.5L engine like they currently do in the 3. If it isn’t an option, but instead the standard engine for those trims, I would think the price premium would be less, but probably still $1000.

    • 0 avatar
      icemilkcoffee

      Yeah. The 300ft/lb diesel engine would fix the CX-5. Also it would be the only CUV on the market with a diesel. Mazda would have the whole market segment to themselves.

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    Making customers choose between a manual transmission and an engine up to the task of moving this CUV is the sort of thing that GM would have done thirty years ago. The only difference is that GM had a huge market share to squander.

    • 0 avatar
      tresmonos

      Wouldn’t it be great if content choices for the customer weren’t limited by silly things like package contraints, estimated take rates, verification testing, NVH qualifications, manufacturing capacities or any other factor that contributes to the company’s overall profitability?

      • 0 avatar
        kvndoom

        Heh, but they still develop the rotary…

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Isn’t Mazda trying to cultivate a niche as an enthusiast’s alternative to the established players? While it is true that any manual transmission offering is rare in this class, making your customer compromise within your model range to have the transmission of their choice is a good way of turning off the very people you’re trying to attract. It isn’t like we’re talking about a V6 or a turbo with 270 ft/lbs of torque. It is hard to believe that the transmission they use for the 2.0 is so marginal that it wouldn’t work with the 2.5 liter. If they’re only going to offer one for logistical reasons, make it the 2.5 liter. We aren’t talking about some factory hot rod. We’re talking about Mazda’s effort at building an engine equal to those in volume Camrys and Altimas.

      • 0 avatar
        sitting@home

        “Making customers choose between a manual transmission and an engine”

        Here I don’t see too much of a problem; each engine/transmission combination needs to be certified so if Mazda don’t think there’s enough demand for the manual with the 2.5 then they have financial reason not to offer it. I do have a problem when they limit the manual transmission to only lower trim levels with the same engine … Subaru currently seem keen to do this, forcing anyone who doesn’t want a penalty box to have a CVT despite nearly all their vehicles having the same engine.

      • 0 avatar
        srogers

        Just because you and I and 3 other people would like the 2.5 with a manual transmission hardly makes a brilliant business case for it. And you can remove me from that list because, as a driving enthusiast, I’m more likely to buy the mazda3 anyway.

      • 0 avatar
        Mr. K

        Yeah but if they only made a 6 speed manual with a landau roof and dubs I would mortgage my trailer to buy 2!

      • 0 avatar
        tresmonos

        kvndoom:

        you just made my day.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        That Mazda continues to offer a stick, with such a low uptake rate, is just one more indicator that this company, that I will admit a strong positive bias towards, cares about the little things (or BIG things to a small % of potential customers), and is further evidence that they take the enthusiast moniker seriously.

        Mazda really is one of the few manufacturers in the popularly priced segment that puts actions behind its words in this respect.

        Great company, great vehicles, outstanding value (and no, I have zero affiliation with the company, any Mazda dealers, or any suppliers; My last two car purchases were Mazdas, I’ve yet to have a single issue with either, and my next vehicle is looking like it may be the new Mazda 6 with a stick).

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      Only an automatic for the biggest engine? Just the opposite of the ILX.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      Just make the stick a special order option.

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      Don’t be silly. There are no customers “choosing” between the two. I looked up their inventory for all CX-5s within 250 mi of me, and less than 5% are manuals. (And you can bet they aren’t the ones flying off the lots, either.)

      • 0 avatar
        mike978

        redav – your data tally’s with what I had read earlier that only a small % of CX-5′s are manual (certainly <10%). So Mazda had a business case to make and they made it in full possession of the data. I don`t know why some are criticizing them, except for not being T or H.

    • 0 avatar
      chaparral

      The enthusiasts will probably buy the diesel instead.

      I’m wondering why they didn’t go 2.0M/2.5M/2.5A rather than 2.0M/2.0A/2.5A – same number of combinations – but Mazda already certified the 2.0A.

  • avatar
    Beerboy12

    I really want to like this but… No Manual :-(

  • avatar
    jaje

    Why the new 2.2 diesel will not be available in this I don’t understand. It gives it the power but also better mpg than any gas engine could do. Mazda, are you listening? Give us a diesel and even better an option for a manual as well for the die hard enthusiasts!

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      My personal feeling is that they aren’t introducing the diesel here yet because they can’t: They don’t have the inventory & supply chain, they don’t have market cachet & recognition, service techs aren’t trained & equipped, etc. It’s more than likely they have a ton of govt compliance to work through as well.

      I heard that the diesel will show up for the Mazda6 in Sep 2013 (second half of the year). The fact they are doing it then instead of now tells me they aren’t even ready to put it in that car yet.

      Given today’s announcement, I see two possibilities:
      1. They really want to get it to market, and they are busting their butts to get it here, and they are straining to have it on the ground before the end of the year. If it sells well in the 6, they will put it in other models (CX-5 & maybe the 3)
      2. They aren’t seriously behind it are just trying to create some buzz & placate their fans without actually having to work on it. They don’t plan to drop the diesel in other models.

      IMO, the evidence points to 1. So, be patient.

    • 0 avatar
      burgersandbeer

      The story didn’t say the 2.2L diesel would never be available. It only said Mazda was adding the 2.5L gas engine to the lineup.

      Don’t jump to conclusions based on incomplete information. Stay tuned.

  • avatar
    icemilkcoffee

    I think it’s a mistake for Mazda to introduce the diesel engine in the 6 instead of the CX-5. Mazda’s been selling the diesel CX-5 in Japan since Feb or Mar of this year. By the time the cars arrive in american showrooms next spring, Mazda will have had 1 full year to debug the diesel CX-5, thus assuring a flawless introduction into the US market.

    But instead they chose to introduce their diesel lineup in a brand new and untested, undebugged Mazda6. There is a lot riding on this. If the car has any kind of glitches or hiccups, Mazda will be getting off on the wrong foot.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      The diesel will come into the 6 part way through the model year so Mazda will have had 6+ months to debug it.

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      The rest of the world doesn’t use the same diesel as we do (ultra-low sulfur), and frankly, not having sold one here before, they have a steep learning curve on how to get Americans to buy it.

      I also believe with the unexpected success of the diesel in other markets (something like 80% of CX-5s sold in Japan were diesels), they simply didn’t have enough of them to sell here. They expanded their engine manufacturing plant, so I think they solved that part, but I think they are very concerned about screwing up the initial offering & killing any future opportunity wiht the tech here.

      • 0 avatar
        Beerboy12

        The ultra low sulfur exists because the new common rail diesels require it so the rest of the world is very much up to speed on low sulfur diesel and so are the manufacturers including GM, Ford and Fiat. Fiat developed the common rail diesel if I am not mistaken.

      • 0 avatar
        icemilkcoffee

        Beerboy is right- the rest of the world do indeed use ultra low sulphur diesel. In fact the US of A is probably the last first world nation to adopt this.

  • avatar
    Astigmatism

    Diesel diesel diesel diesel diesel diesel diesel!!!!!!

  • avatar
    klossfam

    The bottom line – from having driven a few CX-5s in FWD and AWD – the 2.0L is very borderline on being enough engine for even the FWD CX-5…The 2.5L as the base engine would be a better idea.

    Still, short of a diesel, this is good news. You need at least 175 to 185 hp in this class of vehicle regardless of weight. Of course a turbo also solves some issues (we have a 2011 Tiguan) but at the cost of 3-4 mpg.

  • avatar
    deanst

    a bit off topic, but isn’t that Paddy’s Pub from Sunny in Philadelphia?

  • avatar
    Beerboy12

    If Mazda does release a diesel version of the CX-5 I hope they A) have a manual version and B) give it a decent tow rating.
    All due respect to anti diesel arguments and arguments to suitable tow vehicles I think that a manual diesel CX-5 would be a run away lifestyle vehicle success!
    VW… Are you paying attention (Tiguan) ???

  • avatar
    burgersandbeer

    Does only pairing the 2.5L gas engine with the automatic in the CX-5 have any implications for the Mazda6?

    How does the process of getting government approval for powertrain combinations work? If the 2.5L and auto are approved in the CX-5, does that mean Mazda can sell that combination in any vehicle, or does each combination need testing in every vehicle a manufacturer plans to use it in?

    If Mazda is planning a 2.5L/manual combo for the Mazda6, any reason they couldn’t use that combo in the CX-5? Is this a case where Mazda could offer it without any additional expense if they wanted to, but they think it’s pointless based on projected sales?


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