By on September 14, 2012

What’s a Mustang? We know, but it’s not an easy question to answer. A Mustang is…a Mustang. It’s so thoroughly itself that there’s no need to define it as a variant of someone else’s car. All truly great cars are like this. Competitors might meet and even beat them in this or that regard, but until they develop identities of their own they’ll never possess the same allure. The Europeans practically have such cars in their DNA. The Americans and Japanese have stumbled over the goal line from time to time. The Koreans…well, the Koreans are still new. So what’s a Genesis Coupe?

At launch, the styling of the Genesis in both coupe and sedan forms betrayed the parent company’s lack of confidence and direction. Both cars were styled much like someone else’s car, a Lexus (itself still styled a late-model Mercedes) in the case of the sedan and an Infiniti in the case of the coupe. Neither car’s face projected a clear, distinctive identity or a connection with the parent company. With its 2013 refresh, the Genesis Coupe takes a step in this direction. The new face isn’t to everyone’s liking. But, dramatically styled around an oversized hexagonal grille, it’s bold, cohesive, like those on other new Hyundais, and not like anyone else’s. The Korean company clearly feels more confident. It’s now comfortable with people identifying the Genesis Coupe as a Hyundai.

Yet it remains unclear what the Genesis Coupe wants to be when it grows up. Many reviews compare the car to a Mustang or a Camaro. But the Gen Coupe doesn’t look like a pony, sit like a pony, walk like a pony, or talk like a pony. It’s not a pony. Aside from the new face, the car most resembles a G37 Coupe. Which is…what? Well, the Infiniti is itself a reflection of someone else’s car, specifically a BMW 3-Series, with more reliable bits (the first generation’s engine might burn oil and its suspension might chew tires, but its electronics are solid!) and a lower price. With the BMW ever deeper into its own identity crisis—driver’s car, or luxury car, or technophile’s wet dream?—the entire class could well be losing its center.

When considering which aspect of the G37 / 3-Series to pursue, Hyundai clearly didn’t decide on gadgetry. There’s Bluetooth and iPod integration, and Hyundai’s new telematics system with the top trim level, but nothing approaching the pervasive technological overkill of recent BMWs or the nanny infestation of recent Infinitis. You don’t need to RTFM to figure out how to operate the car. Perhaps Hyundai focused more on the 3-Series that used to be. If so, not a bad move. More likely, though, the Koreans were pursuing a much lower price point and a BMW-class armada of microprocessors wasn’t budget compliant.

Top trim Genesis Coupes are somewhat luxurious. But even with substantial upgrades for 2013 the interior remains well short of the Infiniti G37’s, itself no match for the BMW’s (until it’s next redesigned). The Hyundai’s interior is nice…considering the price. Even at the Hyundai’s price a power driver seat recliner (standard on a mid-level VW Jetta) might be expected, but remains notable in its absence. Opt for the performance-oriented R-Spec, and the seat adjustments are entirely manual. The seat itself is neither as substantial nor as cushy as that in a G37. One must conclude that, despite the premium aspirations of the Genesis sub-brand, the Genesis Coupe isn’t about luxury.

Despite sharing a name, the coupe has little in common with the sedan. The two cars don’t look alike, they don’t drive alike, they’re not contented alike, and they’re not priced alike. Why, then, do they share a name? When two dissimilar cars share a name, at least one will lack an identity among the broader public.

By process of elimination, the Genesis Coupe must be about the driving experience, the thing that originally made BMWs desirable. In some ways the Genesis Coupe comes closer to the 3-Series than the Infiniti intermediary. This is partly good, partly bad. The Genesis Coupe feels more composed and less tricky to drive than the G37. Especially with the R-Spec’s limited-slip differential, the Hyundai’s rear end can be provoked to rotate by your right foot, but it won’t deal out nasty surprises the way the Infiniti’s will. But, partly by the same token, the Hyundai doesn’t feel as direct or as visceral as the Infiniti. Driving the G37 is more of an experience. Like a BMW, the Genesis Coupe only begins to come alive when pushed, and feels better the harder it is pushed. Hyundai’s engineers have made much progress on this front. The Genesis Coupe won’t embarrass itself at the track, but due to the heavy, uncommunicative steering, the car never stops feeling larger and heavier than it is (182.3×73.4×54.5 inches, 3,492 lbs.) and than either target. While fun to drive along a winding road, it still seems less fun than it ought to be, as if Hyundai couldn’t quite commit to a sporty direction (or didn’t fully comprehend what fun feels like).

BMWs aren’t as visceral as they used to be largely due to the company’s pursuit of day-to-day livability. Premium aspirations aside, the same conflict doesn’t seem to have bedeviled Hyundai, judging from the Genesis Coupe’s behavior when it’s not being pushed. Though body motions are well controlled, the ride that felt okay during a preview drive sometimes proved irritatingly busy in daily life (if rarely harsh). The 274-horsepower turbocharged four that seemed to best suit the car earlier has a lumpy, “surge-and-lag” delivery through its midrange at part throttle. Far more than BMW’s new, less-powerful-on-paper 2.0T, this one’s clearly boosted. The vague, somewhat clunky manual shifter further impedes smooth shifts. Add it all up, and the level of concentration required to drive the Genesis Coupe smoothly takes the casual out of casual driving. Not so much that I’d call the Hyundai a bad car, not even close. There’s just not enough payoff of the daily deficit when you are able to really drive the car. It has fallen between the proverbial stools.

But the Genesis Coupe’s price can’t be ignored. It might not be all that special in itself. But a stylish coupe that warrants comparison with a BMW 3-Series yet lists for $27,375 with all available performance hardware, that’s special. With a manual transmission, Infiniti’s “3er for less” lists for nearly $18,000 more. In stark comparison to Hyundai, Infiniti requires a Premium Package to get the Sport Package and nav as well to get the stick. You end up with over $7,000 more “stuff” (as calculated by TrueDelta’s car price comparison tool), but this still leaves the Hyundai with a feature-adjusted price advantage of over $10,000. And maybe you don’t want the stuff.

The thing is, selling on price is exactly the position Hyundai has been striving to escape, and with more than a little success in other, paradoxically less pricey segments. If they’re to do the same with the not-quite-premium Genesis Coupe, they’ve got to decide what the car is really about. If it’s about luxury, it needs more content, better materials, and more refinement. If it’s about driving, it needs sprightlier moves, more direct communication, and, again, more refinement. If it tries to be both, but at an affordable price, it’ll end up where it is.

With either direction, to really come into its own the Genesis Coupe needs to capture the special magic that elevates iconic cars above the rest. It’s not possible to specify what the car’s character should be, except that it can’t be derived from somebody else’s. It needs to be something new, yet this newness can’t be forced. It can only come from someone who thoroughly and deeply understands what he or she wants, who wants a car that no one else is providing, and who can inspire the organization to create it. We’ll know it if and when we see it.

The cars discussed were provided by their respective manufacturers with insurance and a tank of gas.

Michael Karesh operates truedelta.com, a provider of car reliability and pricing information.

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72 Comments on “Review: 2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe 2.0T R-Spec...”


  • avatar
    twotone

    This will make a very nice <$15k used car in 2 – 3 years.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Go check eBay “Buy It Now” and Autotrader for used Genesis prices… Go ahead, I’ll wait.

      More like a $20K car. Guess the whole “Hyundai Resale = crap” is changing as well.

      • 0 avatar

        I had the same reaction. There’s a 2010 R-Spec in Ohio for $17,000, but it’s the cheapest in the country by a good margin. With the upgrades (and $2,000 price hike) for 2013, the current car will probably be in the high teens after three years. Pretty strong considering that a new one is $27.5k before any discounts.

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        Asking price isn’t selling price, and even selling price is skewed by trade in values, etc. there is no way a $27k car that’s 3 yrs old will be a $22-23k on the used market, especially a Hyundai. That would be like an 80% resale value. It simply doesn’t make good financial sense to the buyers, especially when you see the deals offered on new ones now. The Genesis coupe is a really nice car, great looking, good value… but people are not tripping over each other to buy them, new or used.

      • 0 avatar

        The low end of the range on Autotrader is the selling price, in my experience. They’re the prices posted by dealers who give the lowest amount they’ll take to get visibility.

        This said, my earlier math to arrive at “low 20s” was iffy. The $17,000 car seems unusually low, judging from the others. But $18,000 is probably about right currently. Figure another grand or two for price increases and product improvements from 2010 to 2013, and we get $19-20k for this car in three years. I’ve edited my earlier comment accordingly.

    • 0 avatar
      zeus01

      Uh, no. For that sweet deal you need to start with a Dodge Charger, Ford Mustang or Chevy Camaro.

  • avatar
    dolorean

    Still like it, but what’s with the open Catfish maw? Can’t imagine the fun the owner is going to have cleaning out hordes of dead grasshoppers inside there.

    This new style of open, fat-faced grills is really killing a good groove.

  • avatar
    Strippo

    If the nomenclature is bad for this car, just imagine what it’s doing for the sedan. This is the only “Genesis” that car pubs have focused on lately, so…

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    Michael,

    I recall a previous review (yours, not sure) stating this car actually had pretty good steering. Did something change?

    • 0 avatar

      Mostly the reference point and expectations. With the first review, I was evaluating the car as Hyundai’s first effort. I didn’t exactly gush about the steering, but gave it a passing grade, it managed the basics. This time I’m wondering what would make it a car people would consider in itself, and not just as a less expensive alternative to something else.

      It is good steering, not too far off the Infiniti’s, but it could be better. The 2.0T continues to feel more agile than the V6, though their curb weights aren’t that far apart.

      One area where my 2010 review was somehow off the mark: I didn’t think the engine was loud. A later drive discovered plenty of noise. My ears must have been clogged the day of the initial drive.

      • 0 avatar
        psarhjinian

        I went back and checked and it was actually Mr. Solowiow who’s quoted as saying it has Porsche-level steering.

        http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2009/03/review-2010-hyundai-genesis-coupe-38-grand-touring/

        Personally, I’ve not been in one of these in ages and can’t recall one way or the other.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    “It’s now comfortable with people identifying the Genesis Coupe as a Hyundai.”

    There’s an ongoing trend in the industry to have each brand carry its own recognizable “face.” (You can probably blame the Germans for this trend.) This doesn’t sound like confidence, so much as it does like Hyundai jumping on everyone else’s bandwagon.

    “to really come into its own the Genesis Coupe needs to capture the special magic that elevates iconic cars above the rest.”

    Icons are rare, and while they are nice to have, they aren’t essential to success.

    At this point, Hyundai should continue to focus on its ongoing efforts to get people to take it seriously. So far, it has done an exemplary job of building a good reputation where it previously had none (Europe) or an appalling one (the US.)

    • 0 avatar

      True, but when the Genesis was developed Hyundai hadn’t decided if they wanted people to identify it as a Hyundai or as a separate brand (just in case they decided to add a luxury channel). With the Gen Coupe refacing they’ve clearly decided to identify it as a Hyundai. But will the Genesis sedan and Equus also get this face? It doesn’t seem likely.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        OK, I see what you’re going with that. The jury is still out, but I still contend that it makes sense for Hyundai to create a luxury badge, and to sell the luxury cars with that badge attached.

        Perhaps Hyundai corporate is heading in that direction, but wouldn’t include the coupe in that plan. In my mind, that makes sense — this car seems more similar to the Celica or Mustang than it does the 3-series.

      • 0 avatar
        Xeranar

        I know this is pure conjecture but Hyundai is slowly sliding their whole product line out of the basement leaving Kia to fight on in that segment. It seems like they’re repositioning themselves as a mid-level brand, straddling the entry-level luxury class while carrying some low prices on their sub-compacts.

        Also, electronics probably the cheapest thing to add to a car. To do a simple infotainment system the processor cost should run less than 200 a unit, the screen is more expensive but 7 inch tablets are breaking even at that price. Car companies are just slow to adopt because at speed non-tactile services can be difficult to operate.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        Hyundai is not going to launch a separate luxury brand or if they do, it will be a sub-brand and not with a separate dealer network.

        Doing so will add thousands to the pricetag and we all have seen what have happened to RWD sales for Infiniti and Lexus.

        And it’s not like Kia is just going to sit on the sidelines while Hyundai increases its luxury lineup.

        Next year, Kia will be launching the Cadenza which, while upscale and not luxury, will dip Kia’s toes at higher ends of the market.

        A year or so after that, the Quoris should make its way to the States and that will likely be joined by a production version of the GT concept.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      Actually it was more so Ford that started “The Face Race” in the late 80’s, everything but trucks looked like Taurus’s.

      But I do agree with your point, if Hyundai wants to be bold lets see a mid engined sports car.

      • 0 avatar
        ranwhenparked

        It might be older than that. I’ve always thought the idea of having a common corporate look was a leftover from the 1930s-1950s period when every manufacturer’s entire model range was essentially just one car available in 2 wheelbase lengths and a bunch of body styles. You know, back when the answer to what car you drove could simply be “’53 Nash”, with no need to elaborate further.

      • 0 avatar
        niky

        BW double kidneys and Alfa’s shield come to mind. The corporate look is not a new idea. What is new is that with the Veloster Turbo and the three door Elantra GT, Hyundai is now tying the Coupe more closely into its model range. This fills a gap that opened up when the Tiburon died off.

      • 0 avatar

        I’m not remotely arguing that sharing a face across a line is new. It’s nearly as old as the automobile. What’s new is Hyundai putting the brand’s face on the Genesis Coupe. Earlier they wanted some distance between the Genesis and other Hyundais. But people think much more highly of Hyundai now than even three years ago, so the brand identity isn’t the drag it once was.

  • avatar
    jonnyguitar

    Thelonius Monk once said, “You have to play it correctly the first, or second, time, or you know, that’s it. That’s your problem, you have to hear that the rest of your life.”

  • avatar
    tjh8402

    Excellent review Michael. Having driven both the g37 and e90 generation 3 series, you are absolutely correct in your characterization of both cars. I love your description of driving the G37 as an “experience” because it really is. There’s nothing out there anywhere near its price that has that matches the feel of a visceral, challenging performance sports car hidden under a thin layer of luxury. I’d say marketwise, the 335i’s and G37’s that Hyundai has to watch out for are not the new ones, but the CPO ones that are priced much closer and come with generous warranties that come close to matching the new car one on the Hyundai.

    What sort of fuel economy did you get with the car? That seems to be one of the main advantages that the Genesis has in both 4 and 6 cylinder form (the 2.0t beating the BMW and Infiniti, and the V-6 matching while offering – on paper – more horsepower while burning regular instead of premium).

    • 0 avatar

      In general, Hyundais seem to underperform their specs by about 10 percent. So the 2.0T feels more like 250 horsepower than 274.

      I observed low 20s driving the car somewhat aggressively. With a really light foot and good luck with traffic lights I could nudge it just over 30. On the other hand, when I really pushed the car on a route that didn’t require many stops the trip computer reported 16.7. In general, fuel economy with a turbo will vary across a wider range than a non-turbo.

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    I don’t know how you can review this car and not mention the smell. Unless you’ve had your nose cauterized or you’re a chain smoker, it really has to be experienced to be believed. It was enough to keep me from test driving one when I was looking at a Genesis Type R sedan. The sedan didn’t smell anywhere near as bad, probably because of fewer waste grade synthetic interior materials.

  • avatar
    Conslaw

    What’s the insurance like on the Genesis Coupe? Cheaper than the Mustang?

  • avatar
    gslippy

    I think I’d prefer the 3.8 V6, now rated at 330 HP I believe. Even powering my Sedona minivan in 250 HP trim, it’s a very strong runner without the wonkiness of a turbo.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    Dosen’t this model use a Mitsubishi engine?

    I don’t understand how the styling is “bold”, it takes its cues and general shape from the Nissan 370z and uses a deformed GTR “face”,

    A bolder decision would be to ditch the silly aggresive styling and try something else.

    • 0 avatar
      tjh8402

      I think the original Genesis 2.0t was a detuned Evo engine…one of the reasons the fuel economy was so abysmal relative to its horsepower (the theory being that the turbo 4 would be the preferred tuner engine and the Evo engine is obviously eminently tuneable). The specs on this engine sound just like the 2.0 liter turbo 4 in the Sonata, Optima, and other cars. dunno if it is the same engine.

      As for looks, its very subjective. I don’t think pictures do the car justice. I really like the way it looks in person.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        It was de-tuned to not compete with Hyundais V6, once the 6 got a bump the turbo 4 was un-de-tuned.

        Pictures generally do it for me, if you see a good looking car in a picture chances are it’ll look better in person, and vice versa.

        I still say that the mold for this car was heavily melted before it was produced.

      • 0 avatar

        This remains a different engine from the 2.0T in the Sonata. I haven’t checked what this engine has in common with the Evo’s, but in my notes I do have “more obviously a turbo than BMW 2.0T, closer to Evo.”

        The Evo is hardly a paragon of refinement–in my notes I describe its engine as an “angry hair dryer”–but its even greater lapses are more expected and accepted in a hardcore performance car.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      The GEMA engine was a 3-way joint project between Hyundai, Mitsubishi, and Chrysler before those three went their separate ways. The block architecture is shared, but the head details and tuning are done individually.

  • avatar

    I’m not sure about other states, but Hyundai has spent almost $0 in NYC advertising this car. I’ve seen more ads for the FR-S. This car is a better overall car than the BRZ and FRS. It doesn’t have the same name equity as the InfinitiG37, but for what it is, it’s pretty awesome.

    I was invited to an R-spec Genesis and R-spec Coupe roadtest drive like the Veloster turbo/Sonata 2.0t drive I did 3 weeks ago.

    I’ve already driven the R-specs. The Genesis R-spec was OK, but nowhere near as awesome as the SRT8 Charger/300. The coupe looks like it would be more fun.

  • avatar
    Juniper

    So, How much money does Hyundai lose on every Genesis Coupe? Just asking!

    • 0 avatar
      niky

      Are we including the 450 million spent to develop the V8 engine alone? The engine which represents an infintesimal amount of total Hyundai sales?

      • 0 avatar
        niky

        Yes, Hyundai, we know it’s big and heavy, but we still want a factory V8 coupe.

      • 0 avatar

        I’ve read 260 million for the engine, still a considerable sum. Much of that would have gone into tooling that will be amortized for many years. But the volumes aren’t relevant. Developing a state-of-the-art DOHC V8 significantly improved the company’s reputation among both the automotive press and the general public. Hardly anyone thinks of the Excel when they hear “Hyundai” anymore.

      • 0 avatar
        niky

        $260 m claimed for development, I don’t recall where I read the 450 at ($600m for the car in toto), probably includes tooling and production line… Would make sense since an entire factory costs around $300m…

        Making cars is expensive. :p

      • 0 avatar

        My understanding is that the bulk of $100m+ “development” figures is always for tooling, with the amount for tooling varying a lot based on projected volume. The amount for design and testing alone is generally in the tens of millions. Otherwise low volume models would not exist.

      • 0 avatar
        niky

        Depends on the engine. For continuations, maybe… but for grounds-up designs like the V8, it’s possible for the development costs alone to be in the hundreds range.

        Low volume models with their own engines almost don’t exist, anymore. Only Ferrari really has the financial capability of building their own engines from the ground up, and they amortize costs with Maserati.

  • avatar
    docsoloman

    I am a contract driver for Hyundai, and I believe the Genesis Coupe R-Spec is a perfect example of Hyundai’s marketing plan.They know their position in the auto industry,and do an excellent job of presenting that position. They know they are not a high end luxury line, and they know they are not a big, we have something for everybody line.Even though their line is limited, they want the public to discover the quality of their models is very good, in most cases very close to their high end competitors, but at a very affordable price for the average consumer. They know they do not have the capacity to rival Toyota, Nissan, and Honda in sales, they just want everybody to know they are now very comparable in quality to those lines for less money. In other words, give us a try. Their aggressive styling has convinced many to try, and many are very surprised.

  • avatar
    bodayguy

    I don’t think this competes at all with a new G37 or 3-series. I’ve always seen the Genesis Coupe as this generation’s Prelude or Celica – an import entry-level coupe.

  • avatar
    360joules

    Um, call coming from 1987, it’s the Ford Probe/Mustang development team….yep, they’re asking for a floppy disk or a microfilm of this car’s design to be sent back to their timeline…they promise to bury some extra Air Jordans in the time capsule…

  • avatar
    sketch447

    Does anyone actually know someone who owns a Hyundai Genesis? I’ve never come across one. And why should one pay $27k for a cramped 4cyl coupe when one can get a more powerful base stang or camaro (both with far more automotive gravitas) for the same price or less??

    • 0 avatar
      naterator

      They are completely different cars. I have zero interest in the Mustang/Charger/Camaro. Oversized, overstyled, fat-assed throwbacks to when cars really weren’t that great. This thing, though, intrigues me. Alas, my tight-fistedness keeps me from even going ofor a test drive.

    • 0 avatar
      naterator

      They are completely different cars. I have zero interest in the Mustang/Charger (or is it Challenger?)/Camaro. Oversized, overstyled throwbacks to when cars really weren’t that great. This thing, though, intrigues me. Alas, my tight-fistedness keeps me from even going for a test drive.

      • 0 avatar
        CarnotCycle

        Charger? I think ‘Challenger’ is closer in that trio anymore.

        Ford Mustang weighs about the same as a Genesis coupe, about the same size. Has more power and better gas mileage though. And I think – still – a live axle in the back.

        I know a guy who bought a Genesis R-Spec like the one here. We drove around Santa Monica a little bit in it. It is a pliable corporate-coupe. You can feel focus groups and pie-charts in every little detail. This guy shopped his R-Spec with a Mustang. Why the R-Spec? The big warranty and with this guy being 25, it was his very first new car.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        If you think the Mustang is oversized, then you also think this is oversized. The Genesis is just a bit shorter than the Mustang, but it’s the same width, height, and weight.

    • 0 avatar
      iluvnetty

      I own one, granted it’s the V-6 model but, I basically chose it over the others for the reason that you just stated, you never see them. People who drive Mustangs and Camaros don’t ever get stopped in the middle of public to ask what they’re driving or to simply admire the vehicle. Nobody ever says my ride is truly better than either of the other choices but, the fact is I get lots of attention and that’s the whole reason of owning a sports car. I don’t even turn my head when I see Mustangs or Camaros but, you can bet I’ll pay attention if I see another Gen Coupe roll by. I guess it might be overly American of me but, I say who cares what exactly you have as long as no one else has one.

  • avatar
    CarnotCycle

    One thing about cars with ‘identity’ that Hyundai-and-analogs miss is the engine. All ‘real’ Pony cars have crossplane V8’s. All Porsche 911’s have flat-6’s. BMW’s 3-series always had a balanced 6 turning rear wheels (recent identity-crises aside).

    Car-people know the kind of motor in most every iconic vehicle. Non-car people know what iconic vehicle’s motor is supposed to sound like. A turbocharged corporate-4 is not going to make an identity in anything beyond it being corporate, much less an industrial icon.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Dollars to donuts that NA and turbo V6s are the volume engines in the next Mustang and the V8 is a niche product sold in tiny numbers.

      And if you don’t think a turbo four can produce an identity, you haven’t been looking at VW and Audi products recently… the various 2.0T engines have really made a name for themselves. (Granted, Hyundai’s isn’t nearly as good.)

      • 0 avatar
        CarnotCycle

        You very well could be right about the V8 being a niche product in Mustangs. Or Camaros. But twenty years from now, the one people will remember and care about is going to be the niche V8 model.

        That’s ‘identity.’

  • avatar
    plunk10

    I bet this thing is cheaper to insure than a Mustang GT. 14 years ago, I faced the same dilema, and chose a Prelude over a Mustang, thanks to 66% cheaper insurance bill for the year.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    “Many reviews compare the car to a Mustang or a Camaro. But the Gen Coupe doesn’t look like a pony, sit like a pony, walk like a pony, or talk like a pony. It’s not a pony.”

    Really? Look at its size, weight, content, and layout, and the single car it competes most closely with has to be the Mustang.

    It’s underequipped, unluxurious, and unrefined compared to the Infinitis and BMWs you reference. It’s bigger and less wieldy than sports cars like the 370Z or FR-S. It follows the ponycar formula exactly: take a midsize platform, cut the wheelbase and a pair of doors, put in decent power, and keep the price cheap, even at the expense of refinement.

  • avatar
    riverfishguy

    Does it drive like other hyundai products? Because if so they need to provide a steering wheel mounted cheater bar for leverage when it starts violently pulling to one side.

  • avatar
    bd2

    “At launch, the styling of the Genesis in both coupe and sedan forms betrayed the parent company’s lack of confidence and direction. Both cars were styled much like someone else’s car, a Lexus (itself still styled a late-model Mercedes) in the case of the sedan and an Infiniti in the case of the coupe.”

    — Methinks Karesh is a bit off when it comes to design evalutation.

    The Genesis sedan looks little like any Lexus and mostly resembles BMW with the greenhouse with the Hofmeister kink and the rear fascia (ironically, the new Accord sedan has the same design attributes).

    And aside from having the basic coupe silhouette, the Genesis coupe looked nothing like the G35/37 – diff. front fasica, greenhouse and rear fasica (even at the side, the GenCoupe wasn’t as flat/slab-sided as the G35/37).

    If anything, one could say that since the GenCoupe equally like the Tiburon, that the G35, itself, was styled like the Tiburon.

    Anyway, it was a mistake for Hyundai to give the gaping, oversized hexagonal grill to the refreshed Genesis coupe since the GC is supposed to be a part of Hyundai’s higher-end lineup.

    While it’s not exactly there in pricepoint or luxuriousness, the next gen GC will be paired with the new compact RWD (HK) sedan and together, the 2 will make up Hyundai’s entry-level luxury entrant.

    And in being so, both the sedan and coupe will not have the design language that is used for Hyundai’s mainstream lineup.

  • avatar
    Thill

    Let me just say, I had no intention of buying a Hyundai. Was not even on my radar when I began test driving cars to replace my beloved 2006 Mazda 3. I wanted something with more power this time around so I was looking at Mazda Speed3, Mustang (V6), Camaro (V6), Camry SE (V6), Ford Fusion V6, Subaru WRX, etc.

    When I was doing some research online I stumbled across the Sonata 2.0 Turbo and 2013 Gencoupe and decided to give them a test drive. I fell in love with the 2013 Genesis 2.0T coupe the minute I drove it. Solid handling. Plenty of horsepower and torque. Very nice amenities. Great price. Having come from RX-7’s, Jetta VR6, BMW 3 series, Altima 3.5 SE, and then the Mazda 3 I just could not get used to the front the of Mustang sitting behind the wheel. While on paper the Gencoupe and Mustang are not that different in size, behind the wheel the Mustang felt more like a boat and I just was not sold on the old man retro styling. The Camaro was similar in that it felt huge, and there are major blind spots with the car.

    The Genesis coupe seemed to balance performance, with amenities, price, gas mileage, etc. The warranty is great as well and I simply know lots of people that have had great experiences over the past 8 years buying Hyundai.

    Have had the car for about 4 months now and it still puts a smile on my face.


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