By on May 23, 2012

It is a little bit like showing breasts at a plastic surgeon congress: At the annual meeting of the JSAE, the Japanese version of the Society of Automotive Engineers, Subaru totally disrobed its BRZ and shows it to a strictly professional audience.

According to a quick image search on Google, this would be the first time that the drive train of the Hachi-Roku has been shown without disturbing sheet metal.

The professional audience was impressed. Back home at the office, the engineers work on electric motors, or hybrid drives, so seeing a boxer engine was a bit like vintage porn, professional meeting or not.

The 2012 JSAE Annual Congress began today at the Pacifico in Yokohama. It lasts through Friday, May 25. If you hop on a plane now, then you will be able to brag that you saw a naked  Hachi-Roku in the flesh.

(Want a screen saver with belts and pulleys? There are high resolution versions of the pictures in the gallery.)

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24 Comments on “NSFW: Stark Naked Pictures Of Toyota 86, Subaru BRZ, Scion FRS, Hachi-Roku...”


  • avatar
    stuntmonkey

    The very epitome of ‘low center of gravity’

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Most FWD car’s engines are below the strut perch. Nothing new here.

      Not low enough as most “sports cars”, but more like sporty like a Civic. The top of 245/40-18 are at the bottom of the cam cover on my Saturn Sky. If BRZ/86 had true SLA(short-long arm) independent suspension the shock tower would be at the top of the brake rotor, yo.

      MacPherson struts, boxer engine, along with spindley transmission(I wonder how it’s going to handle the torque of the turbo?) was obviously designed for packaging reasons to give more room to the interior.

      • 0 avatar

        I think you’re missing something: this car’s engine is below the TIRE tops. Look at where the heads (and this being a boxer, the crank) is relative to the tires. Everything above that is either an accessory (alternator, water pump, A/C, I think) or it’s the mostly plastic intake manifold and injectors.

        I’m not smart enough to say how crucial low Cg is to sportiness (especially relative to things like weight distribution, polar moment of inertia, driver position, tires, suspension…) but the BRZ/86 design is highly focused on getting the heavy bits very low to the ground, more so than in a conventional fwd I4 drivetrain, or even most of the sporty cars out there.

        Not the lowest, perhaps, but this thing is not just a short-wheelbase Impreza.

      • 0 avatar
        RGS920

        “Not low enough as most “sports cars””

        According to Subaru, the BRZ has a lower center of gravity than a Ferrari 458 Italia or Porsche Caymen. I believe that the Caymen R and Lexus LFA have it beat by a couple millemeters. What “sports cars” are you referring to?

        Also the BRZ has a turbo now???

      • 0 avatar
        AKADriver

        The gearbox is a derivative of a common Aisin unit used in, among other things, the Mazdaspeed Miata and the S15 Silvia turbo. Tremec T56 it’s not, but four cylinder turbo applications exist.

        Article about the confusing history of its development here. Aisin considers it part of their AZ6 family, but Toyota spec’d tons of detail changes to it to improve shift quality.

        http://kaizenfactor.wordpress.com/2012/04/26/were-we-and-aisin-wrong-about-the-brz-fr-s-gt-86-manual-transmission-or-is-scion/

  • avatar
    gslippy

    Yuk on the boxer engine – I don’t like them. And now I see how enormous it is for only displacing 2.0 liters.

  • avatar
    I_Like_Pie

    I don’t intend to sound completely ignorant, but why couldn’t one make an I-4 engine and just set it on its side…if you really want a low center of gravity?

    Seems like there is a lot more metal in that subaru boxer than there should be….lot of redundancy in the form of cams, CAS, belts, and pulleys.

    • 0 avatar
      stuntmonkey

      If you lay an I4 on the side, the crank will be either off center, or the engine block will be off center. If you lay it flat and do a transverse layout, you have to turn the power delivery 90 degrees, which is inefficient, and which almost nobody does. The boxer is bigger, but not as big as the pictures suggest… it’s a bit of an optical illusion taking four cylinders and splaying them open… you’re not used to seeing the ancillaries and piping on top of the engine where they would normally be down low in a straight-four.

      Besides, you get the *almost* perfect primary and secondary balance of a boxer that you wouldn’t with a straight four.

      • 0 avatar
        arbnpx

        There’s a short list of naturally balanced engine designs; the one that I know well that don’t require an excessive amount of cylinders are boxer-4 and inline-6. I’m a bit sad that few car manufacturers are making inline-6 cars; we’re down to BMW and Volvo. It’s especially disappointing, considering that there were some legendary engines, like the Nissan RB26 and Toyota 2JZ, that were replaced, either by market forces, or because a turbo V6 could do the same job in a package that’s not as long in the engine bay.

        There was an image of the FA20 engine’s crankshaft released by Toyota in the “86 development story” at the Las Vegas event. The crankshaft doesn’t have counterweights, because they’re not necessary, due to the inherent balance in the engine design. No balance shafts, either. I’ve heard that the FA20 engine is rather smooth at higher revs, which seems a bit weird, considering that it sounds just like an inline-4. I’ll get to find out myself in a few weeks.

      • 0 avatar
        icemilkcoffee

        arbnpx:
        The boxer 4 cyl is not inherently balanced. The FA20 crank does have counterweights:
        http://forums.club4ag.com/zerothread?id=107035

        The aircooled VW engines did not have counterweights because those engines redlined at around 4000rpm. If you are modifying one of those engines, the first thing you’d do is get a counterweighted crankshaft.

  • avatar
    Joe McKinney

    That is an impressive serpentine belt. The craziest belt configuration has to be the one on the Corvair that wraps over the top of the engine from the flywheel to the cooling fan.

  • avatar
    HiFlite999

    The protective covers on the top pulleys is a nice touch. Not a fan of the MacPherson struts though.

  • avatar
    Advance_92

    Truly that’s one belt to rule them all: alternator, AC compressor and I guess water pump. That said does this motor use chains for the cams? I see timing marks on the main pulley; does that belt run the cams, too?

  • avatar

    This is how I see cars. Well, this and the driver’s seat and controls.

    Sheetmetal is just a wrapper.

  • avatar
    cRacK hEaD aLLeY

    I dunno… a lot of things have to be doubled: 2 heads, 2 gaskets, 4 camshafts, two cam chains… essentially finding ways to complicate what can essentially be a simple engine.

  • avatar
    Educator(of teachers)Dan

    Lower than a snakes bellybutton…

  • avatar
    wmba

    These pictures are deceptive. The engine is tiny when you actually get to look at it, and very short front to back. It’s mounted so low that they made special short struts to keep a low hoodline. But boy, the armchair engineers here can tell at a glance that the transmission is too spindley (sic). Someone else denies the inherent balance of a flat four, and rambles on about crankshaft counterweights. Another doesn’t like boxer engines.

    Bah. Just opinions and that’s a fact.

  • avatar
    stuntmonkey

    > the inherent balance of a flat four

    Even though the pistons in each bank are opposed throughout the crank rotation, the crank pins are offset -> a bit of a wobble during rotation. Not much, but a little, but for all intents and purposes, much more ‘near’ perfect than an inline, where the crank doesn’t wobble but you would need dual counter-rotating shafts to perfectly balance the motion of the pistons.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    “According to a quick image search on Google, this would be the first time that the drive train of the Hachi-Roku has been shown without disturbing sheet metal.”

    Looks like the same display that’s been floating around for a few months. There’s a huge picture thread on ft86club.

    This may be the only recent dedicated RWD car to mount the steering rack behind the engine, a trace of the car’s Impreza roots.

  • avatar
    FJ60LandCruiser

    Toyota, stop gloating as if you invented the cheap, lightweight car and make more of these damn things. American dealers are already drooling over slapping tremendous mark-ups on them. Nothing will fix that better than satisfying demand.

    …unless customers realize that the car is underpowered and buy a Genesis/Stang/Camaro instead.

  • avatar
    danwat1234

    Is Subaru making direct injection engines yet?, and I have yet to hear any guarantees about a Subaru Hybrid in the near future.


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