By on March 14, 2012

The Chevrolet Caprice might be second to the Toyota FT-86 in the sheer volume of rumors surrounding when and where it will go on sale. The rear-drive, 6.0L V8 powered Caprice is currently sold only to fleet customers, but the “detective’s cars” sold as unmarked units look suspiciously like civilian-ready full size sedans.

Chevrolet announced that their Impala, set to be redesigned in 2014, would be replaced on the NASCAR circuit by an all-new model that would also be sold in showrooms. Chevrolet said they’ll unveil the new model later this year, with a 2013 debut in showrooms. The Impala is out, and it would be too early for Chevrolet to produce the Code concept, and the “Gen Y” positioning would be all wrong for NASCAR.

The Caprice makes a lot of sense; rear-drive, V8, great nameplate (even though the Caprice was never in the upper echelon of the muscle car hierarchy) and already approved for sale here in the USA. But the specter of rising gas prices, CAFE regulations and Murphy’s Law makes me wonder whether this is all too good to be true, and if a small-block V8 powered performance sedan is really what GM wants to launch in this kind of economic and political climate.

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76 Comments on “Chevrolet To Get New NASCAR Entrant – And All New Product For Showrooms...”


  • avatar
    86er

    These “Detective Specials” keep showing up on eBay. No idea how GM dealers are offering them to the public.

    GM has to sell many more Cruzes, and dare I say, Volts, to make CAFE room for these suckers.

    • 0 avatar
      Educator(of teachers)Dan

      Yeah I keep seeing them too. Pisses me off. Supposedly I can’t buy or order one but you see them on eBay with insanely low miles. Enthusiast want it, man up GM and just be honest and sell it. People who really want it will pay whatever you ask and pay any required gas guzzler penalties or anything else.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      Down under, Holden already produces a dual fuel gasoline/CNG version of the Commodore and Commodore Sportwagon from the factory. Given the technology already exists, meeting the CAFE gods with a dual fuel option seems possible.

      • 0 avatar
        Athos Nobile

        @APaGttH… the dual fuel cars were petrol/LPG not CNG. This year they are offering dedicated LPG.

        @Dan… inquiring minds want to see ebay linky

      • 0 avatar
        Educator(of teachers)Dan

        http://tinyurl.com/857ooa4

        There you go. First four listings (for the next 18 hours) are Caprice police vehicles. all with less than 10,000 miles. All from the same dealer BTW. How is he getting away with it? Either the car is for sale to the public or its not. Good scheme though. Does he buy the cars let the sales managers drive them a few hundred miles and then put them up for sale?

      • 0 avatar
        Athos Nobile

        @Dan Cheers mate.

        @DrSandman… google WM Holden Caprice interior.

        This whole NASCAR thing got to the local news sites. Drive has a nice Commodore shop.

      • 0 avatar
        outback_ute

        Interesting to see the ebay auctions, 3 at $22,xxx with half a day to go, I wonder where they will end up. Sourcing the interior trim wouldn’t be too bad (would be worth trying Pontiac G8 stuff to see if it fits first, except for rear carpet & door trims), might need to get some middle east market carpet for the LHD footwell. Surely the A pillar mounted spotlight would be a turn-off for many people though?

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        There’s nothing to “get away” with here. The dealer apparently has some kind of arrangement with a local PD to supply them with new “Detective Specials” on a regular basis, then takes the lightly-used ones back to flip as used cars.

    • 0 avatar
      DrSandman

      Sigh — I was going to respond that I found my next car, but after looking at it on the lot, I was left feeling underwhelmed. I still want the G8; it looks nicer. This is a little too… plain.

      • 0 avatar
        Educator(of teachers)Dan

        If you search autotrader instead (which I prefer because it gives real prices not “oh lets start the auction here and see how high people are willing to go”) and you’ll see dealers charging between $26,000 and $32,000 for “used” Caprice cop cars.

        http://tinyurl.com/74gyaeu

        @bumpy ii, I do feel there’s something inherently dishonest about this. What is the nature of the deal between the dealer and say the local Sheriffs/PD purchasing department? I sell you the car at $X you drive it X miles and I buy it back for $X. Are the taxpayers making money, loosing money, breaking even? Sounds like a good place for an investigative reporter to see if its all square or not. The average cop car is kept in service 60,000+ miles not less than 10,000, forgive me if I smell a rat there.

  • avatar
    PaulVincent

    Caprice “muscle car.” Please, the Caprice was never a muscle car.

    • 0 avatar
      Turkina

      1990s Impala SS? What was that, other than a beast of a Caprice?

      • 0 avatar
        PaulVincent

        Well, whatever it was, it wasn’t a muscle car (I grew up in that era. Saying a Caprice was a muscle car is like saying a Newport or an LTD is a muscle car). My sister-in-law is still driving ’96 SS Impala, so I know all about them

      • 0 avatar
        86er

        I would call the 94-96 Caprice-based Impala SS a Sleeper, or a Q-ship, for our British readers.

    • 0 avatar
      340-4

      So a ’68 Caprice with, say, a 427, 4 speed, interesting differential gears, F41 suspension, and disk brakes from the factory which could scorch the quarter mile just as well as any other ‘muscle car’ somehow isn’t one?

      Just wow.

      • 0 avatar
        Joe McKinney

        What is a Muscle Car? What’s in a name? This is a great topic which could be discussed and debated at length.

        In the 1960′s the term Muscle Car was coined to describe a sporty coupe based on an intermediate-sized platform. Likewise the term Pony Car denoted a sporty coupe based on a compact platform. The GTO and Road Runner were Muscle Cars. The Mustang and Camaro were Pony Cars.

        The Caprice has always been a full-sized car and as such is too big to be considered a Muscle Car in the traditional sense. Cars like the 1990′s Impala SS and 2000′s Mercury Marauder were full-sized sedans which further distances them from the true Muscle Cars.

        As with the term Classic Car, the term Muscle Car has all but lost its original meaning. Today people refer to almost any high-performence car as a Muscle Car and any car more than 20-25 years old as a Classic Car.

        Part of the confusion could be that there are no longer any real Muscle Cars or Pony Cars in the original sense of the terms. Today’s Mustang, Camaro and Challenger are all based on truncated, full-sized sedan platforms and are larger and much heavier than their predecessors. This is most evident with the Challenger. It is worth noting that Ford and Chevy are planning to make the next generation Mustang and Camaro smaller and lighter than the current models.

    • 0 avatar
      56BelAire

      Maybe they should just call it the Chevrolet G-8.

    • 0 avatar
      carbiz

      LOL. The company I used to work for did several Callaway conversions of ’94 through ’96 Impala SS. With the engine change, brakes, wheels, suspension tweaks, that vehicle was very much a ‘muscle’ car.
      Then again, as a kid, I recall most ‘muscle cars’ were beaters that began as pedestrian Dusters, Barracudas and Torinos: it was the after market tweaking that turned them into monsters.

  • avatar
    mjz

    How about bringing the Cruze Hatch and/or Wagon here instead? With gas going to $4/5 per gallon, a big RWD V8 sedan isn’t going to be in much demand at your local Chevy dealer. Great move GM.

    • 0 avatar
      George B

      Cruze Hatch and/or Wagon with diesel and manual transmission too? Damn it! This is America. There will always be some demand for big RWD V8 sedans. The question is can GM make money building and selling them with the twin burdens of a weak dollar and CAFE gas guzzler tax.

  • avatar
    jeanpierresarti

    Doesn’t Dodge sell a bunch of Chargers and 300s with a V8? I don’t understand why Chevy does not just give it a try and sell the Caprice. What do they have to lose? What car in the GM stable would the Caprice eat sales from?

    • 0 avatar
      86er

      “What car in the GM stable would the Caprice eat sales from?”

      Possibly the Impala, although from what I can gather the Impala will be closer than ever to the Malibu, likely in looks and dimensions.

      Perhaps what makes GM more reticient about selling these cars is not just CAFE but also cutting into the fat profit margins of the Tahoe.

      Dollars and cents-wise, GM has to determine if they can spread costs globally with the rapidly-aging Zeta platform, or just abandon it. It would hang the Middle East and Australia out to dry, but we’ll see.

      • 0 avatar
        philadlj

        One big difference between the 2013 Malibu and 2014(?) Impala – the Malibu is four-cylinder only. The Impala will be V6-powered…and will probably be stretched in every dimension, a la XTS.

      • 0 avatar
        86er

        “The Impala will be V6-powered…and will probably be stretched in every dimension, a la XTS.”

        Hopefully in hip and shoulder room too, otherwise this Caprice makes sense in that respect as a civilian offering.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Considering the post-demise love of the G8 GT/GXP, and North America is the only territory you can’t buy a four-door Zeta car as a civilian (ya, I know the stray Caprice units out there), a dedicated LS3 powered car in the space would make sense.

    If you’ve never driven a G8 GT or especially the GXP – you just don’t understand; it was an amazing car – too little, too late. The 6.0L V8 is rather efficient all things considered, and wouldn’t destroy CAFE due to the small volumes. The LS3 without AFM is thirsty.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    I really like the Caprice, but I fear it’s a bit long in the tooth to be suddenly introduced as a “new model” in the Chevy lineup.

    It’s bad enough the Cruze’s interior easily surpasses the more expensive Malibu and Impala, both of which are due for redesigns.

    It’s quite another to “bring back” the Caprice – which used to be the flagship – as a rebadged Holden that hasn’t received significant changes since 2006 (the last year the Impala was redesigned, incedently).

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      For 2013, the Zeta platform is getting updated, and not just a reskin like it got in 2010. The update is a year behind original product plans, pushed off due to the global financial crisis. The VE is set to be retired this year.

      http://news.drive.com.au/drive/motor-news/new-holden-vf-commodore-locked-in-20110310-1bphg.html

      Given there isn’t a whole lot wrong with the existing Zeta platform dynamics (handling, braking, ride, performance) updating and refinement is music to my ears. The bigger question is how much of a diet (the G8 GT was 3995 pounds and didn’t get a spare tire to reach that weight) and what engines under the hood to meet fuel economy needs.

      After the VF release next year – the water gets very murky. I suspect the VF will be the last RWD Commodore, and GM will go back to FWD architecture. Either Ford or Holden will blink first.

      • 0 avatar
        outback_ute

        There was no re-skin in 2010, just new plastics (front fascia) and slightly changed headlights. They also modified the interior recently to add a touch-screen.

        I think there are still two alternatives to FWD, either continue with an updated Zeta platform, or base a car off a stretched Alpha platform as they did the V-car platform for so many years. I don’t know that they are likely alternatives mind you, and I can’t see a unique FWD car either.

  • avatar
    threeer

    Looks can certainly be subjective and open to wild swings of opinion…but this looks, well…um, unassuming (the kindest word I can think of). There are so many hints of other cars in this design that it doesn’t wind up looking any different than most mid-sized cars out there. If (and a BIG “IF”) GM decided to sell this to the general public, I’d hope that the style would differntiate itself enough to make it worth having.

    • 0 avatar
      srogers

      Yes. Looks like a full size Daewoo Nubira. If that front cowl was any higher, you’d need a periscope to see over the hood.
      Gives Internet car guys “the wood” because of RWD and V8, which do nothing to make it a popular choice over the Impala.

    • 0 avatar
      Steven02

      Go look at Holden’s website. The car sold in the US is supposed to be unassuming, especially in detective form.

  • avatar
    Rod Panhard

    It’s got a cop motor, it’s got cop tires, cop suspensions, cop shocks. it’ll run good on regular gas. Do you think the cigarette lighter works?

  • avatar
    Dawnrazor

    This saga continues to greatly puzzle me.

    I distinctly remember a few years back when GM really did look like an endangered species, one of the first things it did to try and get its s*** together again was to bring the magnificent Pontiac G8 GXP to our market. Having had the pleasure of flogging this great car on several occasions, I can confidently state that it’s probably the best sedan they’ve ever sold in the U.S., and definitely stood toe-to-toe with world-class stuff like the 5-Series. In fact, it might be the best sedan ever built by ANY American car maker.

    Then, in true GM fashion they fornicated the canine by allowing this car to succomb to collateral damage as a result of Pontiac’s demise. Just when I thought someone there actually had a pulse and a brain, they proved to be the same old GM after all.

    How hard would it have been to just badge-engineer the G8 as an Impala SS and keep it on the market (it’s not as if GM didn’t have extensive experience with badge engineering after all)? Why are they playing games continuing to build these great cars but then being steadfastly obstinate about just selling the damn things to the public? Do they REALLY think we’d prefer the FWD rental special Impala currently on sale?

    With this car, they could have a real Chevy “halo” which recalls the glory days of high-powered muscle sedans; it would win them customers back as well as serve as additional evidence that GM as a whole really had changed for the better. It could be an Impala SS truly worthy of the badge, and would serve a currently underserved market (there’s no direct competition for the Charger); it would also serve as a diversion away from the Volt fiasco, which is certainly in GM’s interest.

    I know that cars like this run counter to current economic and political climate, but that’s part of the point! Besides, Chrysler seems to be having no difficulty moving plenty of Chargers in this “climate”; the introduction of a proper Impala SS would likely ignite a fun rivalry with the Charger-SRT.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    GM has been silly with this fleet-only business. They don’t bring it over as a regular model since the exchange rate is too unfavorable to import them on speculation. Even so, they could have offered it as a special-order-only halo car. Charge extra, let people order any wacky configuration they like with the understanding that delivery would take 4-6 months, then pick one week to run the non-fleet orders 2 or 3 times a year.

  • avatar
    Speed3

    I’d prefer to see more wagons. Cruze wagon, Regal wagon (it could be called the Roadmaster!), ATS wagon.

    As for the Caprice, Its already at the end of its model cycle. I can’t see it stacking up well against the new Charger/300. I’d wait for the next version and develop it with the U.S. market in mind.

    • 0 avatar
      outback_ute

      Holden did a wagon version of the Commodore/G8 on the basis that it would be sold into the US (to justify the development cost), but that didn’t happen of course. It is quite stylish, looks similar to photos of the Jaguar XF wagon.

  • avatar

    This looks like a great answer to Chrysler 300. How are sales of that one, BTW?

  • avatar
    340-4

    So.

    Malibu – 4 cyl.

    Impala – 6 cyl.

    Caprice – 8 cyl.

    I can smell win if this is done properly.

    But, shades of the 1960′s and 70′s here, won’t this create a lot of strange competition between Chevy and Buick?

    Maybe I can see it. Premium FWD is Buick. Performance/luxury whatever is Cadillac. Premium RWD is Caprice.

  • avatar
    Burnout Dave

    SELL IT…and drive down the price of used G8s in the process

  • avatar
    pdieten

    I understand the Caprice is now available with the 3.6L V6. I wouldn’t be a bit surprised if that were the combination that became available to consumers. Maybe the 6L as an “SS” variant.

    I’d happily drive that car with a 3.6 in it, assuming no reliability issues.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    I realize I should take GM Inside News scoops with a grain of salt, but they’re saying the ’14 Impala won’t be V6-only and may not be FWD-only. There will be a model with the same 2.4L eAssist as the LaCrosse, and AWD may be offered as an option.

    As for the car that will replace the NASCAR Impala: “According to sources close to the matter, the car will be produced in extremely low volumes and will likely house the LS3 6.2-liter V-8.”

    They say the timing of the release “aligns with Holden’s scheduled update to the Commodore for 2013″, which will consist of “revised styling inside and out, better aerodynamics and an overall design theme that fits better with new Holden’s (thus Chevrolet as well)”.

    • 0 avatar
      ponchoman49

      The 2014 Impala is definitely getting the E-assist 4 cylinder setup but it will more than likely be the new 2.5 liter engine. The 3.6 AFM V6 and current 6 speed automatic will also be in tow as the premium offering. The 2.4 SIDI engine is supposed to be replaced by the 2.5 in all it’s application by 2014 with more power and refinement and better MPG.

  • avatar
    Freddie

    What’s the point of an “unmarked” car if that model is only used by the police? At least that Crown Victoria behind you could theoretically belong to a private owner.

    • 0 avatar
      DubTee1480

      Thank you. I’ve wondered that myself. Although, given how little attention most people pay when they’re on the road…

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      You are giving WAY too much credit to the average criminal slob and have watched way too much CSI to get an idea on what goes down on under cover operations. Strongly suggest you watch some old school cops. In all honesty, some criminals are so stupid the use of an “unmarked” car is apparently optional in itself.

  • avatar
    Spike_in_Brisbane

    When GM was importing the Commodore as a Pontiac G8, the US dollar was 20% stronger against the Aussie dollar than today and it was too expensive then. Unless I read that Chevie are going to tool up to build these things in Detroit or somewhere I will dismiss the rumor.
    The Volt is a great car until you start debating the price. Same thing will happen with the Holden.

  • avatar
    MrGreenMan

    Maybe it could inaugurate the return of a Chevrolet car that has a back seat capable of seating adults. The new Malibu is a complete failure with legroom. Further, the rake in the current Impala renders the back seat considerably less functional than the 3800 series version.

    Since people buy for peak capacity, give people an option for the occasional 4-adult car ride. Make that back seat wide with lots of leg room — like, you know, a 1980s GM midsize had.

  • avatar
    Nick

    C’mon bring back a Chevelle SS (and a Canadian only Beaumont Sport Deluxe for Derek, me, and the other Canucks).

  • avatar
    chicagoland

    OK, kids, the Chevy Caprice was never, ever a “muscle car”! I can’t stand the misuse of the term. The 427 V8 versions were highway cruisers, not performace cars, and not muscle cars by any means.

    No, not all 1960′s domestic RWD cars were ‘muscle cars’, kids. Some think all 60′s Mustangs were such, and are shocked to find out there were I6 versions. And some think all Chevelles were ‘muscle’, and don’t know about Pontiac LeMans or Tempest. i.e. this was posted once: “I saw some kind of stange GTO, I didn’t know there was a LeMans package for it”

  • avatar
    mkirk

    Sell it and give Buick one too. They sold a lot of Caprices and Roadmasters along side one another. Bring back a great Buick name too…Electra or something.

  • avatar
    mkirk

    And sell a lot of them so Ford will maybe wake up and give us a Panther II

  • avatar
    chicagoland

    It is legal to sell used police cars. Once a car is titled, it is not ‘new’ anymore. Dealers do this to ‘sell’ overstocked cars. Saab did it and Ford unloaded last Mercurys this way. They call them ‘demos’ and sell used.

    So, want an Aussie Caprice? Go for it!

    And I say yes to a limited run, the V6 base G8′s didnt sell. And low volume will keep resale high and avoid fleet dumps, as what Mopar does to V6 Chargers. Chevy Commodore?

  • avatar
    Kevin Kluttz

    Nothing GM builds is good enough to be “too good to be true.” As a matter of fact, GM going bankrupt again and permanently with no bailout is MY idea of “too good to be true.”
    Thirty-two years ago GM sold the farm on turning their whole car line, save a few models, to front-wheel drive. At least they were going in the right direction at that moment. I’ve been driving for 39 years (yes, since 1973), and up until 1987 drove rear-wheel drives exclusively, the last one being THE vaunted 1985 Toyota Corolla GT-S Twin-Cam 16. Long title for a 168″ car. Anyway, traded that jewel in on a 1987 Toyota Corolla FX-16 GT-S. Shorter car yet, but a slightly shorter title, too. I am, from the moment I took off in that FX-16 then and still today and going forward, convinced that except for the density of components, front-wheel drive is superior in every way to any rear-wheel drive system for everyday driving. No one, really, is out there being Dale Earnhardt or Dan Wheldon all the time. (Even they aren’t now. And I was very fond of both of them, so stop hating.)
    My point is, GM is retarded and must have Alzheimer’s at the top rungs. THEY are the ones who tried to convince the whole motoring nation that the front wheels should be driving their cars. Now they want to build 16 mpg or less rear-wheel drive cars with oil past peak and gas at $4 per gallon.

    And people, not smart people, still buy their crap. It’s beyond my understanding.

    • 0 avatar
      Kevin Kluttz

      Oh, and then there’s the 4000 lb. Volt. What a Lampoon.

    • 0 avatar
      MrGreenMan

      It’s OK that you don’t want it, but there are people who remember and prefer the ride experience of this sort of car to what can be bought today. It’s going to be a niche car, even if they figure out a way to stretch it and differentiate a big Buick and a big Cadillac, too.

      The ride experience expected of a boulevard cruiser is that of an expansive car that floats on the road with significant power ready to go if needed. (Which is why the old Caprice was, if anything, a sleeper, not a muscle car.)

      This combination cannot be found in FWD, at least in domestic offering. If you pair two traditional adversaries in their final incarnations — the Lincoln Town Car vs. Cadillac DeVille/Buick Park Avenue/Olds 98 — you will get a smoother, more comfortable, more enjoyable ride from the Lincoln because it is RWD. You will get no torque steer. The rack and pinion version of the Town Car steering is one of the most graceful out there — you can maneuver that car better than a Cobalt despite the size differences. (Perhaps there’s a better comparison, but I’ve driven both, so that’s observation.) There’s also a noticeable difference between getting pulled through and pushed through a turn that simply makes the pushing more graceful.

      You can get better fuel economy with FWD, and you don’t experience the torque steer at all with a sub-150hp engine, but you can’t put power on a FWD set-up and not have the horrible experience from, say, a 2000ish Impala SS. Further, luxury/performance/V6 anymore means starting at 260hp, which is into the torque steer range on the best FWD steering configuration. Maybe Buick has something to offer on “Hyper Strut”, but you know the General and too-smart components… If you’re buying something for performance, you’re already not prioritizing fuel economy, and the whole “era of austerity” thing is not a universally adopted worldview, but one being forced upon an unwilling world.

      Back to the traditional mark of luxury — Henry Ford’s luxury, space — a cavernous seating area — you will find that modern RWD is going to have the wheels pushed further out to the edges than FWD can do and still accommodate the same engine. In the extreme, look at what Chrysler does with packaging on the 300/Charger — they do many things wrong, but the wheels at the outer edges of the car give you a better usable space for passengers and better handling. For FWD, to push the wheels out further forward is to limit your engine bay capacity and make a defacto choice of a small engine, which is going to make the thing a slug if it weighs two tons, or require some wacky positioning that makes us hearken back to an Olds Toronado with a longitudinal FWD, which you just don’t see anymore because it had no fuel economy benefit.

    • 0 avatar
      kenzter

      So the next generation Lexus LS and IS will be FWD? BMW and MB have it all wrong? I guess you must be smarter than everyone at all of those companies.

    • 0 avatar
      ponchoman49

      But it’s perfectly acceptable that Chrysler, Hyundai, Lexus, Mercedes, Audi and BMW make larger sized V8 powered RWD sedans that get well under 20 MPG. Your hatred for GM is well known here.

      • 0 avatar
        28-cars-later

        TTAC needs a GM hate section lol. I agree with Green Man’s detailed assessment, there is clearly a market for the traditional RWD sedan, otherwise the big dogs would be out of it leaving smaller players like Chrysler in a niche market. I would love if they would realize this is what a Cadillac is meant to be, and build another Fleetwood. Wagons, AWD bimmer-eque sport sedans, rebadged Chevy SUVs, are all nice markets to be in, but to me it seems like the brand is all over the place. Build a Fleetwood GM, sure keep your Opel pony show if it pays the bills, but there is a serious market for a return to traditional Cadillac excellence. Speaking as a Buick/Pontiac loyalist without GM hate, as of right now you don’t make Cadillacs, you make re-skinned luxury cars.

  • avatar
    obruni

    its too bad GM doesn’t have an efficient diesel engine powerful enough for a car this size.

    PSA does, however (3.0 twin-turbo V6, also supplied to Jaguar)

    hmmmmmmm

  • avatar
    Roberto Esponja

    Man, that white thing makes a 1996 Caprice look like a Giugiaro design. Vanilla Dude, there’s your car. :-P

  • avatar

    Don’t discount the fact that they have been rumoring to bring back the Chevelle name.

    Alrighty then… Let’s rerun all of the four-foor Charger arguments from 2005/2006.

  • avatar
    FJ60LandCruiser

    I need a comfy, large RWD sedan for my commutes. A V8 tank like this in the low 20s would totally melt the miles. I could care less about the Government styling. All it’s missing is a bench seat.

    There IS a market for these cars and the fact that GM won’t let private citizens order one is an oversight.

  • avatar
    mcarr

    The recent V8 powered (5.3) Impala SS was rated at 28 mpg highway. The 6.0 was never really known for fuel economy. GM is coming out with a new V8 design in 2013 for light trucks (5.5L?). Add improved AFM and a 6-speed and I bet you could easily see 30 mpg on the highway. I’ll take a wagon version please.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    A RWD larger sized ( I refuse to call it full size) sedan is badly needed at Epsilon Motors and Ford. GM has one too many product holes in there weak lineup today. I find it utterly ridiculous that if I want a coupe or wagon that I need to spend 45-50k on a Cadillac. Or if I want a larger sized RWD sedan that performs my only choices are Chrysler or Hyundai or one of the expensive Germans/Asians.

  • avatar
    chicagoland

    It wasn’t GM that pushed FWD, it was the Import biased auto media. Car and Driver in early 80′s was constantly saying ‘as soon as all new cars are FWD, we will be better off, of course this doesn’t count BMW’s’.

    But one issue is that gear-heads expecting duplicates of 60′s cars will not buy them. As with the AUS made GTO, they’ll whine “it dont look like ‘da old ones.”

  • avatar
    doctor olds

    These ZETA cars are wonderful, especially with the V8. The DI V6 is no slouch either. They are sold in China as Buick Park Avenues, and in the middle east as Chevrolets. Most striking to this GM guy upon visiting Oz in 2010, was the abundance of Holdens, a surprising number converted by their owners into Chevrolets! It seemed like every 5th car was a G8, (with a holden face) with very sweet wagons and ute’s sprinkled in. I was most amazed at how many had been converted into Chevrolets by Aussies, since Chevys have not been offered for sale there for very many years.
    I really like zeta, but it was federalized with intro of G8, and could have been reintroduced as a Chevy a couple of years ago.

    If I were a betting man, I would bet this upcoming new model will not be a zeta, but new small rwd arhitecture. I feel confident I will want one!


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