By on September 29, 2011

[Editor’s note: I want to be clear that, despite the unconventional, somewhat light-hearted tone of this post, the editors of TTAC take the right to drive very seriously. Sometimes, however, the absurdity of injustice can only be captured with more absurdity]

Najalaa Harriri lives in a sad little world where women are still forced to dress like Halloween ghosts. Besides spending a miserable lifetime as someone else’s property, Ms. Harriri was sentenced to ten lashes for the ultimate sin of driving an automobile in Saudi Arabia (the sentence has since been suspended by the king). I have to wonder about this. Was it a Yugo? A souped up Corolla that did powerslides? A car imported from Zionist occupiers who still give Muslims more rights than the Saudi monarchy?

No to all the above.

She was just drivingA carA machine that offers freedom in ways that infuriate ass sitting mullahs who have nothing better to do than to rarely shower and treat women like obedient sex objects.

On the brighter side of life though,  at least she won’t have to worry about getting stoned.

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30 Comments on “Fun With Youtube: Woman Drives Car. Gets Beaten....”


  • avatar
    GS650G

    When the oil runs out over there they will have more important things than women driving to worry about.

    • 0 avatar
      VanillaDude

      A beating.
      A woman in that culture can be beaten – because she is a woman.

      Could you beat your mother? Your sister? Your daughter?

      A culture that can do this is worse than barbaric.

      The reasons for the beating is secondary. The real crimes here is how much hatred and disrespect this culture has for humans born with double X chromosones.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    Update: King Abdullah has lifted the punishment.

    http://www.businessweek.com/news/2011-09-29/saudi-king-revokes-lashing-sentence-against-woman-who-drove.html

    Like all Saudi kings since Ibn Saud, Abdullah is caught between the tide of progress and the wrath of the clerics.

  • avatar
    OldandSlow

    I thought the Saudi King had over-ruled the sentence that imposed 10 lashes.

    Imagine the ruckus, if she had been caught riding a Harley Davidson.

  • avatar
    gslippy

    Well-said, Steve.

  • avatar
    Japanese Buick

    What with this and the King recently granting women the right to vote in municipal elections, pretty soon they’ll be burning bras and it’ll be Woodstock Riyadh!!!

    A couple of days ago a woman’s rights activist was interviewed on BBC. I really felt sorry for her as I listened to her delicately try to tread the balance between forcefully advocating for her rights and not going so far as to attract the wrath of the mullahs. One claim she made was that driving was not illegal for Saudi women to drive, they just don’t do it “out of convention.” The disbelieving interveewer really went for the kill at that point.

  • avatar
    Domestic Hearse

    The graphic on the door of the car (attached video).

    Is that a stick figure sex act?

    And do the mullahs know about it?

  • avatar
    claytori

    Does this headline apply to Danica Patrick and Milka Duno?

  • avatar
    HiFlite999

    I read this article with disgust. First of course at the sentence of lashing. The only real difference between us and them however are the nearly limitless powers granted to the religious police in SA – the study of which would present a good example of the need for seperation of church and state. Remember, good Christians in Salem were burning witches back in the day.

    Second is the utterly arrogant western presumption,in full display within this article, that we know what’s best for everyone else. Having lived in Saudi Arabia (not in a compound but mixed in with the population), I, together with my fluent-Arabic-speaking wife, were invited into Saudi homes and socialized with Saudi families. If the Saudi women which I met and with which my wife pal-ed around with are “spending a miserable lifetime as someone else’s property”, they do an excellent job of hiding that fact.

    If one wishes good examples of women with miserable lives, one need not leave the borders of the USA, one could look at the 21% of American children growing up in poverty and their mothers trying to support them on low-paying or non-existent jobs and without free education, free medical care and minimum family income assistence (which Saudi women have).

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      +1.

      Most Saudis I’ve come across seem an awful lot better of than many segments of the US population.

      “Good” Christians don’t burn witches, though.

      Neither is there anything religiously fundamentalistic about a bunch of weirdos making up laws regarding conveyances not invented until centuries after a religion’s fundamental texts were written. It’s just one more example of some government harassing people. After all, that’s what government is for, regardless of whether those in charge justify their rights to harass with reference to some religion, or to some other ideological construct, like Marxism, Nazism or Democracy.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      The only real difference between us and them however are the nearly limitless powers granted to the religious police in SA

      And that’s a considerable difference.

      Second is the utterly arrogant western presumption,in full display within this article, that we know what’s best for everyone else.

      The women who are protesting this are Saudis. Do their opinions not count for anything? Does their desire to have some autonomy mark them as hapless dupes and stooges for Western values?

    • 0 avatar
      gogogodzilla

      Second is the utterly arrogant western presumption,in full display within this article, that we know what’s best for everyone else.

      If it’s wrong to judge other cultures, then who are you to say that my cultural values are wrong?

      Cultural relativism is a double-edged blade; it cuts both ways.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      I’m coming to this discussion very late, because I was racing this weekend.

      It would be an “arrogant Western presumption” to state that women *need* to drive, or that all women *should* drive.

      Stating that women should have the same right to drive as men, even if none of them every choose to exercise it, is simply stating a human rights issue.

  • avatar
    daviel

    Any of these mullahs connected with the BMW people?

  • avatar
    Educator(of teachers)Dan

    Gosh I love religious fundamentalism. Makes it easy to realize why someone would right a book called “God Is Not Great.”

  • avatar
    mikey

    A proposed pipe line from from the Candian oil sands to Texas,is meeting resistance from nut bars on both sides of the border.

    The construction alone will provide thousands of Candian and American jobs.

    The “we know whats beat for you” crowd would rather the USA buy thier oil from the more enlightened nations such as Saudi Arabia.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      If I lived within ear, breath or groundwater shot of Alberta or Texas, I’d very much prefer my oil came from the opposite side of the planet, as well. I don’t, so I can’t really say I care one way or the other, but still…..

    • 0 avatar
      eldard

      It really doesn’t matter. Wherever it comes from, oil will still be the whipping boy of speculators (peace be upon them), as it should be.

  • avatar
    Advo

    Can somebody tell me why women shouldn’t be allowed to drive?

    Can anybody justify using violence to stop a woman from doing that?

  • avatar
    Acubra

    Aside from the disgusting “traditions” described, this piece surely beats them all for the number of embedded links.

  • avatar
    reclusive_in_nature

    I’m sure I’m going to draw some self righteous rebuttals for this, but what the hell:

    I’ve spent three years deployed with the Army in Iraq and am currently in Afghanistan on my fourth one year deployment. I’ve never seen a woman drive in either country. I’ve also not seen one car accident. (VBIEDs and suicide bombers excluded). Coincidence?

  • avatar
    Elusivellama

    This is why a theocracy or a nation controlled by religious fanatics is never a good idea.

    You believe in God. Good. Excellent.

    Now shut up and go pray in the corner or something, and let the rest of us just concentrate on living our lives and enjoying it.


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