By on August 17, 2011

Though this new 911 is all-new from the ground-up, and some two and a half inches longer than its predecessor… well, it looks like just another 911, doesn’t it? The Panamera-style interior is the biggest change in terms of design, but the rest of the design is just a tweaked-and-smoothed version of the shape we’ve become very accustomed to. Of course, nobody was expecting anything dramatic from the model that defines evolutionary design in the modern car world, but after the major improvement between the 996 and 997 generations, I was expecting a little more than this. Oh well, at least it’s still a 911.

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26 Comments on “New 911: It’s A Porsche!...”


  • avatar
    PaulieWalnut

    I remember when Clarkson did his first review of the 997, he complained that the car hadn’t moved on from the 996 at all.

    Then he realised he had actually jumped into a 996 by mistake. Great TV.

  • avatar
    TEXN3

    Although I generally prefer my boxer hanging up front, I’ve always liked the Carrera. A compact sports car, the olders one were more spartan and obviously cooler. I really like the new shape, they removed some of the fussiness of the 996 and 997. I just hope they make the various iterations as smooth looking.

    Anyways, it looks pretty obvious that the mass of the vehicle’s design (the cabin) has been moved forward a little. I assume this is for better weight balance.

    I’ll wait for Matchbox or Hot Wheels to make one so I can have another Porsche in the garage.

  • avatar
    carguy

    While the changes are evolutionary, the back end and interior look much better than the 997. The proof will be in the driving and I’ll be interested to see if the 3.4 is really a step forward from the current 3.6.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    Correction: it’s a Porsche with taillamps from an Audi concept car!

  • avatar
    mjz

    I think that color is called “Give Me A Ticket” red. Also, why does Porsche not use a dark color for the top of the i.p., isn’t there a lot of glare on the windshield with a light color like that?

    • 0 avatar
      SunnyvaleCA

      That’s probably “guards red” (unless they have changed the coloring names recently). Maybe you were thinking of the yellow color, which is actually called “speed yellow.”

    • 0 avatar
      squozen

      I’ve driven the Panamera with this colour interior. Yes, there’s a lot of glare unless you’re wearing polarised sunglasses. Porsche do offer split-colour dashes though (black above, beige below).

  • avatar
    wmba

    Gotta get the footprint up for new CAFE rules. Make it bigger and it is allowed poorer mileage without penalty.

    The laws of unintended consequences strike again.

    • 0 avatar
      300zx_guy

      I think that the footprint rule – this is not a US CAFE rule, but a European rule. Still, I HATE CAFE! So many unintended consequences. Most recently, new A3 for US will be sedan only. Wonder why? Because they’d rather sell you a Q3 to lower their truck fleet average (so they can sell another high margin Q7 without penalty). Same reason you can’t buy most wagons in the US – manufacturers need to sell more small “trucks”. Write your congressman, tell them to get CAFE rules changed so we can have more efficient wagons so we don’t have to buy CUVs to get cargo carrying ability.

  • avatar
    stuki

    The rear is definitely stretched. It looks much more Cayman like than the 997. I personally like the rounder rump on the old one from an aesthetic point of view.

    Considering the market P cars is shifting towards people who can afford multiple P cars, a similar interior layout across the range is probably a smart idea. Less room for naysayers to claim the Pan is not a “real” Porsche, if for nothing else.

  • avatar
    Morea

    The wheelbase is 4 inches longer. That’s a huge increase. It was done in an effort to move the engine forward using a newly designed differential. Moving the engine forward pushed the transmission too far into the cabin, hence a longer wheelbase to increase cabin space.

    Shows that after 50 years Porsche is still working to engineer out the negative characteristics of having the engine fully outside the wheelbase.

    It will be interesting to see if the improved weight balance offsets the increase in wheel base when it comes to racing. The 911 has lost its dominance in sports car racing in the last few years.

    • 0 avatar
      chuckrs

      Porsche claims they are planning on a 911 hybrid drivetrain as well. They need extra length to fit the hybrid unit in. Don’t laugh, the GT3RS hybrid is a pretty serious race car. Both Cayenne and Panamera have hybrid drivetrains already.

  • avatar

    OMG

    This is a big deal.

    e: It improves upon the 997. Duh.

    The renderings were pretty close this time. I think that is significant.

  • avatar
    jeffzekas

    Hi Ed, question: is it “safe” to buy a Porsche now? Or will this car have IMS bearing issues like the previous water-cooled Porsche? (I ask, because my son briefly owned a Boxster… with a bad motor, of course).

  • avatar

    I know these are press photos, but that interior looks like an awful nice place to live in. I especially like how the center console flows as a singular piece into the armrest and is completely lined with soft touch materials. Not sure what I would call that color though. Light toffee? Caramel? Ovaltine?

  • avatar
    Britspeak

    This is a small point, but I get annoyed when the word ‘evolutionary’ is used to describe the development of the styling and aesthetics of the 911.

    That word implies progress and adaptation – or simply ‘improvement’. The shape may be more efficient (barely), but it has developed into a complete disaster with all the appeal of an amoeba in a bikini (get the ironic evolutionary reference?)

    In the past the styling of these cars were a huge selling point – now you buy them despite their styling. What a disappointment.

  • avatar
    300zx_guy

    not loving the little ledge at the back of the engine cover. You can even see it in the profile, breaking up the smooth shape of the rear. My guess is that there is some aero advantage to this. I think it would be less obvious from the rear with full width taillamps, like on some previous 911′s. Also not a fan of the front lamps over the vents being deliberately offset instead of integrated into the shape of the vent cutout. But interior is an improvement, never a big fan of the current car’s interior.

  • avatar
    MrWhopee

    Whaddaya expect? CHanging a 911′s looks would be like changing Coca-Cola’s taste. People would soon appeared with pitchforks in Porsche’s HQ in Germany.

  • avatar
    JJ

    I like how they changed the rear end and how the increased wheelbase makes the car look better from the side (IMO).

    One minor complaint though; on the back the Porsche logo with underneath it the Carrera (S) logo in a completely different font look like a bit of an afterthought. Like they all off a sudden had a bigger space to work with than before due to the new spoiler setup and didn’t know what to do with it.

    I know it’s Porsche and you’ll be able to opt for just the ‘Porsche’ logo, just the respective model logo, or neither as well…But like this it looks messy IMO. Shame for them cause these first press shots go all over the world and I’m quite sure it’d look cleaner and better with less badging.

  • avatar
    stuntmonkey

    I’ve always thought that Porsche should do with the 911 what Leica did with their M-series of range-finders… come out with a classic ‘MP’ version. The Leica MP is a completely mechanical film camera… classic and sought after, but separate from Leica’s current digital M9. In the same way, imagine a Porsche 911 ‘MP’… an supercooled ‘heritage’ sportscar that is produced in limited but continuous run, remains unchanged from year to year and which is closer to the classic history of the car but which is also deshackled from the expectation of being newest and fastest… save that for the ‘modern’ 911.

  • avatar
    korvetkeith

    Does the motor blow up?


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