By on June 23, 2011

Clear your mind, look deep into the results of the 2011 JD Power Initial Quality Survey, and what will you find? Based on my limited understanding of the human mind, I’d guess “something that helps prop up your established perspective on the world of cars.” But hey, feel free to prove me wrong. Meanwhile, lest we take any of this too seriously, let’s remember the wise words of Michael Karesh, who noted on last year’s results that

J.D. Power continues to assert that a low number of problems during the first 90 days of ownership should allay any concerns a car buyer might have about a car’s quality. But of course car buyers are most concerned about how a car will hold up in the long run.

Initial quality sometimes correlates with long-term durability, but there’s only a partial connection between the two. Initial quality can result from solid engineering, which will also benefit long-term durability. But strong initial quality can also follow from thorough inspections at the plant or dealer. Such inspections can catch and fix problems that happen to occur before delivery, but aren’t likely to reduce problems down the road.

Karesh’s seminal IQS critique can be found here.

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70 Comments on “Take The 2011 JD Power “Initial Quality” Rorschach Test...”


  • avatar
    jmo

    It’s just another data point. I could certainly imagine a meeting at Mercedes HQ where they decided to beat BMW and Audi at the quality game. We’ll have to wait a few years to see what Karesh, CR, etc. say about long term reliability.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      And no doubt heavily influenced by the amount of money JDP got paid to publish these rankings. I cannot imagine that Dodge paid JDP very much money for being listed on the bottom of this list but I can see Lexus and Honda putting a lot of kkkkkaaaa-chinggggg into JDP’s coffers.

      I’ll take CR’s assessment over JDP any day. At least CR doesn’t take anyone’s money except their subscribers’.

  • avatar
    65corvair

    What it doesn’t tell is the variations between models and options.

    Also did the repair require the transmission to be replaced, or did a piece of trim fall off.

    Back when Ram and Dodge were the same, and Plymonth was around, Dodge did poorly because of complex trucks.

    Better than nothing? Yes. Great? No. Interesting? Yes.

    I guessing the worst on this list would be number one not that many mumber of years ago. How many defects did it take to be number one in 2000?

    The best car so far for my wife and I has been her ’09 Dodge minivan. Zero defects so far! Fiesta, three so far. All very minor, but it is still three. ’04 Toyota Matrix, I don’t want to get started on that one.

  • avatar
    gslippy

    Not very meaningful data, IMO.

    With only a 17% difference between Mazda and Jeep (5th and 25th, respectively), it would be hard to tell much difference in initial quality for most vehicles in the middle of the pack.

    Moreover, I’m not sure what counts as a ‘problem’, but my 05 Odyssey had 7 of them within a week of its purchase, resulting in a lemon lawsuit for one of them. Much comes down to anecdotal evidence like mine, and no JD Power survey will get me to look at Honda for a very long time.

    I’m surprised at Scion’s relatively low standing given its Toyota underpinnings. Maybe all those accessories are problematic?

    I’d look more at long-term reliability, such as provided at TrueDelta (here’s to you, MK).

  • avatar
    ajla

    It is worth pointing out that IQS is not necessarily a reliability ranking.

    Things like “excessive wind noise”, “I don’t get EPA numbers”, “uncomfortable seatbelts”, “transmission shifts too often”, and “MyFordTouch makes me pull my hair out” all have an effect on a rating.

    • 0 avatar
      SVX pearlie

      The initial question of simply “meeting expectations”, whether you got what you think you paid for.

      If enough people say wind noise is excessive, then the car doesn’t meet expectations for quietness. That becomes a valid fault, because it probably means that NVH standards are lower within class.

      Similarly with mileage, if the OEM & EPA did a good job of getting the right numbers on the sticker, numbers which the customer can realistic achieve or exceed.

      After that, it’s a question of “surprise & delight”

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        I’m not saying that they aren’t valid criticisms.

        I was just trying to head off the “JD Power says if you buy a Grand Vitara it will eat its transmission or blow its engine in the 1st 90 days of ownership!!!” comments

      • 0 avatar
        brandloyalty

        Indeed the initial quality survey would not take into consideration that Suzuki installs in the Grand Vitara things such as iridium sparkplugs, a 700 CCA battery, and that the much-feared valve clearance inspections are basically a non-issue. Truedelta’s numbers on the GV simply don’t support the placement of Suzuki on this survey.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        This is a measure of initial quality. It is a metric that has been in the popular perception for over twenty years. Some companies routinely score well on the IQS. Every company talks about it, externally and internally. Every company knows where the bar lies and tries to get over it. Some succeed. Some do not. Ability to meet such goals is a metric of a company’s competence in and of itself.

      • 0 avatar
        PintoFan

        “If enough people say wind noise is excessive, then the car doesn’t meet expectations for quietness. That becomes a valid fault”
        I don’t think so. There are too many variables to really consider something as extraneous as that a “fault.”

        “Similarly with mileage, if the OEM & EPA did a good job of getting the right numbers on the sticker, numbers which the customer can realistic achieve or exceed.”
        Yes, but if someone drives like a moron, gets bad gas mileage, and then blames the manufacturer, is that really the fault of the OEM? I understand what you say about trying to adjust the sticker to reflect real-world variables, but inevitably the people that complain about getting bad mileage are those that really don’t know how to drive. You can’t blame the manufacturer for poor performance when the customer doesn’t deliver on their end of the bargain.

      • 0 avatar
        SVX pearlie

        @PintoFan: If just one person says so, it’ll be lost in the noise that affects all cars. If several people say so, it’s got weight that the OEM needs to consider. That’s why JDP has a minimum reporting threshold.

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    This was pretty much what I’ve been expecting, although it is interesting that Buick is at the bottom of the GM heap. I’m guessing that this is what happens when you sell Opels. Ford will need to change their advertising thrust.

    • 0 avatar
      SVX pearlie

      To what?

      “On average, Ford & Lincoln product only satisfy as well as the lowest-performing worst GM brand”?

      That’s not a strong message?

      Or perhaps: “Still not as good as chevy, but at least we’re not Dodge…”

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        I’m just saying that empty claims about being superior in quality to Toyota won’t fool anyone now. It will be interesting to see if they still have the cajones to emphasize their infotainment toys when they’re stuck trying to defend their quality by claiming that all their unhappy customers just aren’t smart enough to use them.

      • 0 avatar
        SVX pearlie

        It’s entirely possible that Ford overestimated the Customer’s ability to navigate their “smart” system, that it’s not nearly as intuitive as it should be. I agree those are strongly valid issues that Ford will have to address.

        Remember how much flak BMW got for 1st Gen iDrive? All of these new interfaces have teething problems.

      • 0 avatar
        MikeAR

        SVX, you’re right, the Ford people thought that because it was easy for them it should be for everyone else. They didn’t look outside the bubble. Another thing is that I’m sure a lot of people ended up with My Touch or whatever it is as part of an top line options group when they really didn’t want it. I suppose you will be more critical of something like that if you were more or less forced to buy it with an options group.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Another way people end up with features they don’t need is because dealers like to sell what is in stock. They don’t want you to leave without a car. If the closest car to the one you want is one with My Touch, they’re going to convince you that they’re throwing it in for free rather than taking a chance that you’ll still buy a car when they can get one with only the features you want.

      • 0 avatar
        PintoFan

        @CJinSD:
        “I’m just saying that empty claims about being superior in quality to Toyota won’t fool anyone now.”
        If we strip away the empty nonsense about flaws in MyFordTouch, I’m pretty sure Ford would be ahead of Toyota in quality, just like they were last year. Or are our memories conveniently short on that subject?
        “all their unhappy customers just aren’t smart enough to use them.”
        While I understand that marketing essentially precludes Ford from saying that, it is the essential truth behind this whole charade. If customers weren’t forced to make the leap from Japanese cars with no actual features, I’m pretty sure this would be far less of a problem.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        “If we strip away the empty nonsense about flaws in MyFordTouch, I’m pretty sure Ford would be ahead of Toyota in quality, just like they were last year. Or are our memories conveniently short on that subject?”

        Ford bettered Toyota on the survey because of the great sudden acceleration witch hunt. How’s your memory? If Ford profited by the idiocy of people who believed the propaganda machine about cars they owned, it seems like poetic justice that now they’re at the mercy of people who can’t figure out their infotainment toys. Result.

      • 0 avatar
        PintoFan

        @CJinSD: Well, if we replace “witch hunt” with “series of incredibly inept engineering failures that cost an untold number of lives,” I think we might have a more accurate statement. But you also forget that outside of SUA-gate, Toyota had a litany of other quality-control failures that resulted in them recalling EVERY model they currently had in production. EVERY one, many for serious mechanical defects. But the worst part about all of it for Toyota was that it shattered the field of delusion surrounding the quality of their products that they had worked so hard to create, something they will never really recover from, and that has precipitated their fall into second-tier manufacturer status amongst a great deal of the buying public.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Where’ve you been? The NHTSA quietly issued a report on the findings of their efforts and those of NASA to find a cause of the SUA craze. They found it, and it was user error. Looking at the results of the JD Power IQS above, I’d say the attempt at corporate character assassination has failed to take hold. They’re still above the ‘best’ of the domestics.

        Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood: “We enlisted the best and brightest engineers to study Toyota’s electronics system, and the verdict is in. There is no electronic-based cause for unintended, high-speed acceleration in Toyotas.”

      • 0 avatar
        NulloModo

        The marketing message should be safe – there are still plenty of Ford models that perform on par with or superior to the Japanese competition. Ford took top honors for fullsize pickups (and really, the F-150 continues to be Ford’s most important model) and large cars, Toyota didn’t score a single first place win (although granted, Lexus did get a few).

        The message should be that yes, there was a stumble, but Ford is listening to customers’ concerns and is acting on them, in fact, there were public statements regarding this before the report even came out. While there was a dip this year, it will prove to be an aberration between the previous years of continual improvement, and the inevitable jump again next year when the early kinks are worked out of MyFord Touch and this years multitude of new vehicle launches.

        There is also about to be an ad blitz reporting the success of Lincoln in the more relevant JD Power report – the long term dependability. Lincoln scored at the very top of this year’s three year dependability survey, and the MKZ not only scored top honors in its class, but was the 2nd more reliable vehicle in the entire survey.

    • 0 avatar
      PintoFan

      No, Ford customers just need to stop blaming their own technological ineptitude on the manufacturer. The same people having problems with My Ford Touch are the same people who think an Iphone is “complicated:” in other words, the hopelessly behind-the-curve Ford shouldn’t be designing products for those hopelessly mired in the past- they need to be creating products that attract the next generation of consumers. That was the entire logic behind the creation of this system and the offering of cars like the Fiesta. If you aren’t willing to spend the 20 minutes needed to get a feel for the system, then Ford can’t help you. New Ford cars are not for the rotary-phone set. If you want that, I’m sure Toyota can offer you something with no useful features whatsoever.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        It seems Ford may be on the verge of following your advice and blaming the customers. I don’t happen to think it is a good idea, but Ford didn’t create this situation by making good decisions.

      • 0 avatar
        SVX pearlie

        No, OEMs need to stop blaming the Customer.

        Ford needs to “fix” MyTouch, so that it’s more intuitive to the driver. So that they can operate it without impacting their ability to drive safely.

        In the same vein, BMW needs to fix their alternators to charge properly when driven in the US, rather than making up excuses about how the driver doesn’t drive fast enough / long enough.

        Similarly, BMW also needs to fix the HPFPs in their turbo motors so they reliably operate while making full engine power. Not blaming the driver and then neutering the car.

        In all of the above cases, the cars don’t meet customer expectations and are valid quality complaints.

      • 0 avatar
        PintoFan

        Exactly, CJinSD. Ford didn’t create this situation, period. Because there is no actual “situation,” just a bunch of people that would be confused by MS Paint.
        @SVX pearlie: Ford can try updating the interface if they wish. But if they diminish any of the functionality of the system in doing so, or remove any useful features, I will be bitterly disappointed. Manufacturers should not be forced to backslide technology for the sake of a few people afraid of a “newfangled device.” The BMW problems you mentioned are different, because they concern objective mechanical engineering failures with obvious (but expensive) solutions. There is no objective problem with MyFordTouch that can be “fixed” by the manufacturer, in the same way a bad fuel pump can be fixed.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        Ford made a bad move with MyTouch. Some really like the high-tech user interface but it was not wise to load up dealer stock with it. That, coupled with a need for a bit more software development hurt them. You can’t blame the customer. “Rotary dial set” is a pretty unfair statement. I am very comfortable with technology, but I firmly believe that the technology needs to be a real improvement over an existing system to consider it an improvement. Considering that distractions are not really a plus in an automotive environment, I put this into the iDrive category. Perhaps focusing on the voice command aspect of the system would have been a better move. But the screen and the name itself make you focus on using your fingers instead of your voice. Again, that is Ford’s failure, not the customer’s.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        I’m pretty comfortable working with MS Paint, but I’ve never tried using it while driving.

      • 0 avatar
        NulloModo

        I think MyFord Touch would have been better received if it worked smoother on launch. It’s already gotten much more responsive, and the random reboots are extremely rare now, but a lot of people were effected early on and the results show in this survey. Ford is currently in the midst of a major rewrite of the entire software, and given that they are saying it will be fully backwards compatible, I don’t think the core functionality will change, just the responsiveness and stability.

        Ford has done a lot to educate the dealers and sales staff on how to teach customers the use of the system, but a more streamlined tutorial would help. As it is, a lot of the old timer salespeople who have been in the game for decades don’t fully understand the system, and while I’m happy to collect $50 from them every time they need me to deliver a car for them because they don’t know how it works, if other dealers are having similar difficulties but letting customers out without a firm understanding of the system, that will lead to more complaints and problems.

        MyFord Touch is really not all that complicated nor difficult to use if you understand the basics. The most important lesson is don’t use the touch controls while driving when a single voice command would do the same thing faster and with less distraction. The biggest problem with the system now is the name – it should have been MyFord Talk or MyFord Command, or something along those lines.

      • 0 avatar
        SVX pearlie

        Benz has “Command” already taken.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        As a smart phone and MyFord Touch owner I completely disagee with Pinto. Ford needs to get MyFord Touch to work. Random reboots and freezes and the norm, not an exception. Nullo, if random reboots are so rare now, why are they sending out the patch software next month? My 2012 Focus was taken back to Michigan Assembly for fit and finish issues, AND the installation of the new MyFord Touch/Sync release. So far, it is much more stable and reponsive, but I’m a test platform for the new release. They need to get it out yesterday.

      • 0 avatar
        NulloModo

        bball –

        It’s possible that some dealers didn’t update their older stock before selling it, so there could have been some early version software sold even recently. I haven’t seen a Focus that’s had the freezing problem yet, but I suppose it could happen.

        So far I’ve had one customer that had the random reboot issue, and another that had screen tracking issues. The tracking issue was a simple configuration fix, the one that had the reboots was better after a software update.

        It’s possible to trigger a reboot by just mashing buttons too fast. The software in the current state works well if you are patient and don’t just pound on the screen while it’s processing, unfortunately a lot of people take the pause that happens while the system to processing as a freeze, and just start pushing all over, triggering a reboot. It’s still not perfect, and responsiveness is an area where it really needs work, which is why the major rewrite is being done.

  • avatar
    SVX pearlie

    Interesting information here:

    1. GM brands clearly outperform Ford, who clearly outperforms Chrysler. GM actually has 2 brands (Caddy & GMC) among the handful beating the industry average, and Chevy isn’t far off the mark. Ford has issues, and Chrysler takes the bottom spot, as usual.

    2. IQS was steadily improving for years, and then suddenly, in 2011, we’ve got new / refreshed vehicles which are markedly WORSE? What company is unloading so much “NEW” crap into the market that they actually reversed the improvement trend for new cars? Are Chrysler’s “skin jobs” really that bad that they make the entire industry appear worse?

    3. For how much you pay, JLR quality is shameful. Once again, it looks like you need a second Jag for when the first is in the shop…

    4. Mitsu & ‘Zuki being a hair above Dodge does a lot to explain why they’re dying in the US.

    5. How does the Challenger top the Camaro, and Mustang not even rate above average?

    • 0 avatar
      PintoFan

      I’ve developed a theory that the continued success of JLR despite their Kafkan approach to build quality has something to do with the snob appeal of owning an unreliable car. If you have a car in the shop all the time, it means you get to drive your SECOND car, which is an indicator of wealth. Then you can name-drop prices for your repair bills while you wait in line at the Lacoste store checkout. “Oh yes, the HSE is back in the shop again for a new air compressor for the suspension. But really, it’s no big deal; just a paltry $4500.”

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        That’s as good an explanation as any! I’m not sure how happy they are though. Judging by the number of times a Range Rover has brushed my arm while passing me on my bicycle, I’d say Land Rover drivers have a lot of hostility. An exception would be a Marine officer I met in DC. When his Range Rover would honk its horn at random times, then roll down the windows without user inputs, he would tell passengers to just smile and wave, since everyone was staring at us as we sat at traffic lights.

    • 0 avatar
      John Horner

      Brand new models normally have their worst IQS results during the first production year. It takes time for the mfgs. to figure out the problem areas and fix them. Not buying the first model year of any car or truck has been a good buyers rule of thumb forever.

      • 0 avatar
        SVX pearlie

        Yes, and that’s normal. But the IQS of NEW models (only) had been improving until Chrysler decided to revamp everything this year.

        The big negative movement says that Chrysler’s ability to do a refresh is far worse than industry standard.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Ford, Hyundai and Buick also took a dive on the ‘strength’ of their new models. Not sure you can blame this all on Chrysler.

      • 0 avatar
        NulloModo

        I wouldn’t say it’s all Chrysler’s fault either. 2011 was a very busy year as far as new models go for many manufacturers, and no matter the manufacturer, the first year is the most prone to issues, there are certain things that just won’t show up in testing no matter how thorough.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    A few years ago, JD Power changed the scope of the IQS, so that a “problem” is not limited to reliability. For example, a NAV that frustrates its owner with a counterintuitive operating system will be labeled in the IQS as a “problem.”

    Automakers are also accelerating the introduction of multimedia technology into their models, including hands-free and voice-activation systems. Many consumers are attracted by this type of technology, which is perceived to enhance convenience and safety, but some vehicle owners report that their system is not intuitive and/or does not always function properly.

    http://businesscenter.jdpower.com/news/pressrelease.aspx?ID=2011089

    Mr. Karesh’s assessment from 2006 would be out of date. If I recall, about half of the IQS scoring now has nothing to do with reliability.

    You need to get JD Power’s 3-year Vehicle Dependability Study if you want a score that is based purely on reliability. “Quality” in the JD Power lexicon has a different meaning.

    • 0 avatar

      The heavier emphasis on “design quality” began in 2006, and was a focus of the linked critique.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        The heavier emphasis on “design quality” began in 2006, and was a focus of the linked critique.

        In that case, then perhaps you were taken out of context with the quote from you above. (“J.D. Power continues to assert that a low number of problems during the first 90 days of ownership should allay any concerns a car buyer might have about a car’s quality. But of course car buyers are most concerned about how a car will hold up in the long run.”)

        JD Power does not define “quality” as being just a matter of durability. So it is a straw man argument to critique them as if they were claiming that “quality” and “durability” were the same.

        In the JD Power universe, “quality” is a combination of reliability and design. Nobody should be using it for purposes for which it wasn’t intended, i.e. strictly as a reliability survey. That isn’t what it is meant to do.

        And in any case, the survey targets its paying customers — the manufacturers — not the public. The public should use it appropriately, and account for its limitations, whatever those may be.

  • avatar
    Z71_Silvy

    Go Ford go!!!

    Oh wait…………..

    So much for the media’s misconception that Ford’s quality is better than before. It hasn’t changed at all.

  • avatar
    mpresley

    What is the difference between a Scion and a Toyota? Also, without breaking this down to something more usable, it’s not very usable.

    • 0 avatar
      PennSt8

      “What is the difference between a Scion and a Toyota?”

      My sentiments exactly……

      This survey is about as useless as they come. 90 Days into a 6 year commitment has very little impact in swaying where I will spend my money.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        ?Six year commitment? Do people trade that quickly? What is the average number of years of ownership?

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        I poked around looking for an answer. The best I could find was that trade ins were an average of 6.2 years old in October of 2008, 5.8 years old in October, 2007. 45% of people trade in cars less than 4 years old.

      • 0 avatar
        NulloModo

        Husky –

        Those figures include used cars I think, so even though a vehicle may be six years old, it doesn’t mean the owner has kept it for six years. In my experience three to four years seems pretty common for a trade cycle.

        Just this month I’ve had several people trying to trade vehicles that they’ve had for less than a year (mostly due to fuel economy panics, but I did have one where a guy wanted to dump his used Mercedes after he heard how much a new set of brakes would run him).

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Nullo,
        The article I found it in suggested that c.6 years is the average time that people are keeping cars purchased new. 45% or so trade in no more than 4 years, but there are apparently enough keepers to make up for them.

  • avatar
    MoppyMop

    Don’t see Saab on the list. Couldn’t find 100 buyers?

  • avatar
    PintoFan

    And two years ago, Buick was ranked at the highest level. The fact that Lexus now occupies that spot is kind of a joke. So is Toyota being above any kind of “industry standard.” But when you remove every desirable feature from your products, I guess there’s less to go wrong.
    All of the Ford criticism is pretty much echo chamber at this point. Until somebody can prove to me that the “problems” associated with MyFordTouch are anything other than the foibles of the black-and-white TV owning, “those-dang-kids-and-their-electric-geetars” set, I’m not going to care, and neither will anybody else that knows how to use a cell phone.
    The really interesting story here is how the JDM fans have quietly chucked Nissan under the bus. I thought Nissan, Honda and Toyota were the trifecta of mainstream quality? I guess you can only shill so many Versas before that evaporates.

    • 0 avatar
      SVX pearlie

      The trifecta of Japanese quality is Honda, Toyota & Subaru. In that order.

      Nissan, Mitsubishi, Suzuki – all also-rans.

      • 0 avatar
        PintoFan

        It’s all a bunch of marketing spin and delusion anyway, so I don’t really care. But I was under the impression that Datsun got the credit for convincing the public that they had built the first “reliable” car. Of course the history of marketing gimmicks is not my strong suit.

    • 0 avatar
      michaeljeep

      About Ford’s MyFordTouch. Use it, then use an iPad. Note the difference.

      I tried out MyFordTouch at the GM Comparison event that occurred locally a few months back, and I thought it was very cool, but its obvious that it lacks refinement in organization and is quite sluggish. Consumers today who buy cars with gadgets are the same people who buy aforementioned Apple products, and they certainly dont care that the two companies are different. They just want a slick product, because you can impress your friends with slick.

      About Lexus. What kind of joke is Lexus being at the top? Lexus cars might not be flashy, but they are damn good at achieving their intended purpose. They please their customers. Forget about being the MOST reliable, who cares about that. Lexuses ARE reliable. But let me clue you in to WHY Lexus is always near their top. They (and their dealers) care about keeping their customers coming back for repeat purchases. This means they actually try to fix problems with their cars the first time, and they try to keep servicing experiences hassle free. The critical overlooked detail here is that people are subjective on the problems they report. If Joe is happy with his Lexus he is much, much more likely to overlook that problem he had with the alignment.

      Oh, and go try out the remote touch system in a new Lexus. Very innovative, very few complaints from customers, very positive reviews from industry critics. What was that about “removing every desirable feature” from their products?

  • avatar

    Those Jeeps sure suck! Must be belching that brake dust.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    Worthless data point, but one referenced often. If I take delivery of a car, and the car is dirty inside, it counts as a ding against initial quality. This survey is less useful than used toilet paper.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      It is useful because the manufacturers know about it, the public knows about it, and the manufacturers know that the public knows about it. They want to do well. If they don’t, it reflects their ability to set and reach goals. Is it a fact that a poorly dealer prepped car counts against the IQS? Looking at the JD Power website, it isn’t apparent as to which of the categories that they track would be effected by a dirty car.

  • avatar
    T2

    Couldn’t find 100 buyers ? Er.. yes they did, but sadly the demographics of this segment is that most had expired before the 90 days were up.

  • avatar
    gslippy

    Here’s a ‘foreign’ car that would rank below all of these:

    http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/05/russias-avtovaz-investment-pays-off-with-a-whole-lada-embarassment/

  • avatar
    obruni

    Dodge’s last place results are pretty remarkable, considering how well the Grand Caravan, Challenger, and Durango performed.

    what models are dragging Dodge’s results down? A list of the worst offenders in each category would be nice.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      The Dodge Caliber, Charger, and Journey were all worse than average in overall quality. The Challenger was best of a very weak group, with the only listed competitors being Camaro, Mustang, Genesis, and Eclipse. So even though it got a 5-star rating overall for best in class, it had worse than average scores in overall quality mechanical, body and interior quality mechanical, and features and accessories quality mechanical. That probably reflects a high number of defects. Similarly, the Grand Caravan earned an average overall rating while having worse than average scores in three out of four mechanical quality categories. The Avenger apparently didn’t sell in sufficient numbers to be listed, but the Chrysler 200 was worse than average overall in a tough group topped by the Accord, which score ‘among the best’ in all mechanical categories.

  • avatar
    bytheway

    The whole JD power thing is a JOKE.

    MB is makes higher quality cars then Hyundai, Toyota, Infiniti?

    Yea, right

    • 0 avatar
      Steven02

      The IQS ratings aren’t that good. One of the big complaints is going to be wind noise. MB probably has that down. Hyundai… not so much considering it goes light weight to help with fuel economy while noise will be loud.

  • avatar
    mjz

    Which model(s) dragged Dodge down to last place? Chrysler brand scores 110, Dodge 137. 300/Charger, 200/Avenger, Town & Country/Grand Caravan all nearly identical, built in the same plants, so scores should be close for those models. Challenger places first in segment, Durange ties for second. Grand Caravan places third highest in segment. So is the Journey and/or Caliber the culprit here?

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    What is up with Porsche continuing to be rated highly on the IQS? It always seemed improbable, but scratching the surface makes their ranking seem impossible. They only have two models that sell in sufficient numbers to even take part in the Initial Quality Study. Neither are sports cars. The Panamera ranked ‘better than most’ overall in a class towered over by the Lexus LS. The Cayenne scored like one would expect, about as badly as anything can be rated. It was worse than average over all, and worse than average in 3 out of 4 categories of mechanical quality, earning one average score for features and accessories. How in wild fiction does that add up to an overall IQS index with the quality makes? What does it mean for the Porsche sports cars? Nothing. There ought to be asterisks aplenty for a brand rated on 2 of 5 model lines, but I guess that would bring attention to the fact that only one of the two models tracked was better than Soviet surplus.


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