By on April 15, 2010

After much back-and-forth, it seems that the Camaro convertible is a sure thing after all, as this picture has surfaced at the Camaro’s Facebook page. Would you friend it?

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

38 Comments on “What’s Wrong With This Picture: A Camaro You Can See Out Of Edition...”


  • avatar
    porschespeed

    Like many things in life, if it didn’t look good in the first place, taking it’s top off ain’t gonna help.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    On the plus side, yes, you’ll be able to shoulder-check and you won’t feel like you’re driving a pillbox on wheels.

    On the negative, the trunk is probably even more useless than the coupe’s, and that’s saying something.

  • avatar
    Joel

    No, I would not friend it.

  • avatar
    educatordan

    Wow, what’s the deal lately with GM mufflers looking like they’re made from recycled aluminum siding? If their that ugly you need to hide them. If I buy a Cobalt coupe that’s the first thing I’m doing. Installing a cat back system so I can get rid of that factory muffler that looks like someone put a tailpipe on a miniature version of an old washer drum.

  • avatar
    b1msus93

    how this sold just as much as Mustang and Challenger combined last 10 months is beyond me

    • 0 avatar
      NulloModo

      The only reasons it has sold so well have been years of pent up demand, and very potent engines compared to the Ford and Chrysler offerings. Since the demands should already be leveling off and Ford’s new Mustang engines leapfrog the Camaros, the tide will turn pretty fast.

    • 0 avatar
      LectroByte

      Yeah, what Nullo said. Around here, most of the Camaro owners I know personally are older die-hard Chevy fans. I’ve yet to see one being driven by someone under 40. Of course, that may just reflect the current economic situation. From what I hear, much much easier to get into a Mustang GT than a V6 Camaro.

  • avatar

    I would friend it, but hide it’s posts

  • avatar
    Steven02

    I think car is quite the looker. I am looking forward to see it in convertible form. I won’t buy one though. I have one kid and one on the way. Gotta have 4 doors (cries).

  • avatar
    GarbageMotorsCo.

    It took 5 years for the car to be resurrected, what’s another 1 or 2 amonst rednecks?

  • avatar

    Geeze…tough crowd. People cry for years for a RWD performance car. We get it. People cry that cars are too boring. So the pony car wars begin again. Sure, the Camaro’s not perfect, but for its intended purpose, it’s pretty darn close. RWD, sports coupe with modern technology and safety, hoards of horsepower, and at a reasonable price. It could stand to lose a few pounds but, hey, couldn’t we all?

    If trunk space and nice mufflers is your priority you should look elsewhere anyway.

    • 0 avatar
      porschespeed

      jason,

      The only issue I have with the Camaro is that it is just hideously misproportioned to my eye, as well as the eyes of all my friends who are Camaro fans. There is not one view of the Camaro that looks “right”. To my eyes anyway.

      Styling IS highly subjective, and I understand somebody’s gotta like the way it looks. Perhaps it’s because us 40-somethings remember the 60s model that the new one is trying to ape.

      Had it looked anything like the concept, I would have a different opinion. But, as it stands, I put it up there with a ’73 Matador.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      Here’s why trunk space matters: the Ford Mustang has more.

      If the Camaro, once again, puts style over functionality it will, once again, sell only to enthusiasts while people who actually buy these cars in quantity and have to live with them day-to-day and the Mustang, once again, will outsell it by a wide margin. GM needs to sell this car to more than just people who would have bought it sight-unseen: they need to sell it to the people who might otherwise buy a Challenger, Mustang or Genesis.

      GM made a similar mistake with the Solstice/Sky. No, a roadster is not a Camry and shouldn’t be judged as such, but when the Miata will, at least, allow you to fit a gymbag in with the top down and the Miata is the car to beat, you have a problem.

      I like the Camaro. I think it’s pretty cool in general and in raw performance terms probably the best of the three. But when you actually drive one and realize it damn-near impossible to fit a suitcase or somesuch through it’s ridiculous trunk opening and that you can’t see squat in the rear 3/4, suddenly the Mustang (and the Challenger, and even the Genesis coupe) start looking a lot more appealing.

    • 0 avatar

      I strongly disagree, this car sells because it is an excellent car and completely true to it’s and the Chevrolet brands heritage. GM delivered on their promise of performance AND styling with the new Camaro. It’s a pretty damn good value at MSRP too.

      I wasn’t totally sold on the car until I rented an SS in Detroit for a week, after some time passed with it I did not want to return it. The SS was a thoroughly impressive car in every respect and I don’t even like Camaros, until now. After a day I was acclimated to the views out and able to drive it like any other car. It is actually very easy to drive.

      I was very impressed with the ride and handling of the car. It’s general demeanor feels much more solid and teutonic than the Mustang or most other American cars I’ve driven, very similar to the Pontiac G8 which isn’t surprising I guess. Normal handling is extremely good and the structure of the car doesn’t quiver or creak even on Detroit’s bomb-sized potholes and third world roads.

      The 2010 Mustang GT I drove here in Phoenix felt goosey and old on our glass-perfect roads. The axle jiggles in back too, no matter how much Ford fiddles with it, you even get freeway expansion hop at speed for all of your money, which is just how the old muscle cars I’ve had driven. The Mustang GT with similar options somehow costs more to boot even though its been in production since 2005.

      The rear seats and trunk are very large too, unlike the Mustang and the prior Camaro. I made very good use of them regularly. And it is a looker, I’ve never been stared at more often behind the wheel of anything else. It makes Ferraris (which there are plenty of around Birmingham) look anonymous. This car is fun to look at inside and out and feels like something truly special. The Mustang and Genesis certainly don’t impart that same feeling and the Mustang certainly doesn’t give the overall sense of good, modern engineering in how it feels behind the wheel, or when you thunk the door or when you hit less than perfect road surface (especially while turning).

      The Genesis isn’t even competition for this car, Hyundai struggles to move over 1500 per month and doesn’t even break that down between coupe and sedan models.

      The car deserves vastly more praise than it gets. It is an excellent car and GM deserves to sell every one of them. It should also be used as a template for future Chevrolets. Chevrolet products in general should be just as true to the brand’s heritage and exude just as much styling charisma. God knows the Cruze could use that.

      The convertible will be another good variant of this car. Then they can release the Z/28 next. That is the model I’m really looking forward to.

    • 0 avatar
      educatordan

      “and at a reasonable price.”

      Compared to what? An effen Porsche? A Ferrari? THAT’S MY BIGGEST PROBLEM WITH THIS CAR!!!!!!!!!!! Go talk to a dealer and see what kind of markup they’ve got on the sticker!

    • 0 avatar
      Rusted Source

      Teutonic like this?

    • 0 avatar
      Steven02

      educatordan,
      I know you can get this at MSRP. GM can’t prevent a dealer from marking up prices. Comparing MSRP to MSRP of the Mustang, Challenger, or Camaro, you will find they are all close in price. Actual pricing… who knows. The SRT8 Challengers the first year had the same problem as did the 2005 Mustang when it came out. It is a problem that comes and goes.

      porschespeed,
      IMHO, the vehicle is very close to the concept. Somethings, like the concept width, had to be changed. I think the vehicle proportions on the inside aren’t as good as some other vehicles, but aren’t unlivable.

      On the people talking about the trunk space…
      It isn’t as bad as you think. The solstice and sky trunk, unusable. The opening is smaller than you are used to, but you can fit a suit case in there and even golf clubs.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GBmrXqMBGf0

      There shouldn’t be complaints about the trunk. This is a pony car after all.

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      Complaints about price? Try Costco’s car buying service.

      Because I’m GMS and GM Card Family member, Costco would not have been a benefit for me.

      But for folks without access to these things, you could do very well on a new car through them.

    • 0 avatar
      porschespeed

      Taste is highly subjective. You love it? C’est la vie.

      As to price and these things flying off the lots, all I know is here in Midwest Mullet land, Camaros are stacked deep and wide in the lots that I pass.

      If the dealer was getting sticker, I don’t know how. Perhaps a regional thing.

      While I do see the odd Camaro here and there, the streets are paved with Mustangs. I see as many Challengers as Camaros. But once again, a discreet market does not a national sales figure make.

  • avatar
    srogers

    I think that a convertible for the Camaro market is a mistake.

    If they had done the research, they would have realized that the wind will blow off the buyers’ toupeés.

  • avatar
    rpol35

    The convertible seems anti-climatic. After waiting so, so long for this eagerly awaited car and then finding out how goofy looking it is with its flattened top and huge wheels (I know, appearance is subjective) the convertible seems like a “why bother.”

  • avatar
    The Guvna

    Many, many moons ago, when I was young and foolish and owned many more cars than I currently do (sniff…memories…), one of them happened to be a Camaro. An acquaintance of my Dad, a perpetually cash-strapped hillbilly mechanic, likely needed some quick cash for bail money, child support arrears, etc., and fobbed off his then eight year old Camaro on me for less than half of what it was worth. Being nineteen and already having three cars, I did the obviously sensible thing: I bought it. For the first six months or so, it was a great deal of fun. The T-tops seldom left the trunk that summer, and my right foot seldom rose off the firewall. It seemed like a shite car, but it was an endless source of fun for a teenaged lad (and, rather amazingly, it actually *did* work as a bird-puller). The only apparent issues were the typically dicky GM gauges—fuel stops were every three days as a matter of course, just in case. It seemed, then, like a wise investment.

    Six months later, the wretchedness of the Camaro’s build became all too apparent. With barely more than 100,000 kms on the clock, and only five or six thousand since I bought it, it began to rattle and squeak incessantly, and the trim began to shake itself loose at a rather alarming rate. Three clutches, one rad, one head gasket and more than one leaky-T-top-related impromptu full body wash later, I fobbed it off on another hillbilly, luckily for more than I had originally paid for it. Subsequent Camaros may have been sleek lookers and robust performers, but based on my past experiences, I sure as hell wouldn’t have touched one. Cut to two months ago. After reading with great interest about the new Camaro, and being duly impressed with not only its striking retro looks but also the thoroughly modern chassis underpinning it, I had occasion to poke around one at some length. The first thing I noticed was the frankly appalling interior. I can understand the appeal of a throwback styled interior, but quite why they chose to harken back to a Camaro interior of years gone by (when Camaros have had, to a one, utterly rubbish interiors, in terms of both styling AND quality), I’ll never know. Retro Camaro exterior? Good thing. Retro interior? (Shudders). I also noticed that the horrid, tinny rattle that my old Camaro’s doors made upon closing was, incredibly in 2010, still present. I just couldn’t believe how cheap it felt, and looked. So as good as this thing looks on the outside, I just couldn’t live with one again, even as an occasional driver. I’m pleased that the convertible manages to address the rearward visibility issue, but until they fix that interior and manage to screw it together in a much more convincing fashion, I’ll pass, thanks.

    • 0 avatar
      Juniper

      You beat the crap out of a car that had already had the crap beat out of it and it broke. what a surprise.
      You blew a head gasket on a small block chevy? Did you use a sledge hammer?

    • 0 avatar
      The Guvna

      I did indeed “beat the crap” out of a car for a little over half a year and less than ten thousand kilometers (six thousand miles), that in total had scarcely more than sixty thousand total miles on the clock…an average, maths fans, of less than seven thousand miles a year since new. Not exactly Paris-Dakar abuse, was it? The clutches, I’ll cop to—hooliganism has its cost. But if you can come up with a reasonable explanation for a car with that little mileage performing a trim piece strip tease every time it turns a wheel, beyond what seems to me to be the obvious conclusion about its incredibly shite build quality, I’m all ears.

      For what these things cost (and certainly, what my second-hand example did), I’m not expecting Porsche levels of build quality; I know damned well it’s not going be as tight as a drum (or a 911. Or a Corolla, for that matter) after 200,000 miles. But I *would* expect it, or indeed any car, to at least round seventy thousand miles before pieces of interior and exterior trim alike start disintegrating. These things aren’t THAT fast—they don’t break up on re-entry. I have yet to come across a car that fell to pieces (mechanicals not withstanding) because it was driven too quickly, too often. Or, rather, I have yet to come across another one. Mine wasn’t exactly coddled, but in light of the fact that it was used fairly sparingly (as the mileage attests) during the dry months (being in Ontario, only a lunatic would drive a Camaro year round), it doesn’t seem unreasonable to expect a car with 104,000 kms on it to hold together better than one with 300,000 on it. Being driven quickly for sixty-odd thousand miles just doesn’t wash as an acceptable excuse for piss-poor quality, as far as I’m concerned.

      Your mileage may vary.

  • avatar
    Odomeater

    Wow. Gorgeous. The Convertible is a guaranteed winner. I have driven both the V6 and the SS with V8. Think I was more impressed with the capability of the V6 than the thunder of the V8.

  • avatar

    Seems that improves the outward visibility…of the sky above.

    I finally got to sit in one of these for the first time this weekend. Was really unimprseed :(

    My first question was, “wheres the windows?”

  • avatar
    golden2husky

    Friend this? Hell, yes. Yeah that interior design would be a deal killer to me. I am hoping that the refresh will address that. Can’t get all upset about the trunk. I agree with Steven02. It’s a shame it is tiny but that is not a deal killer. Have to compliment GM for offering a manual on both engine choices, a proper rear suspension, and retro yet modern exterior looks. As for the mullet crap, please. Get over it.

    • 0 avatar
      NulloModo

      Or you could get the Mustang which has a nicer interior, has had a convertible version for the entire platform history and thus has the kinks/squeaks/wobbles worked out, has a usable trunk even in ‘vert versions, and for 2011 has engines just as nice as the Camaro, but weighs hundreds of pounds less.

      Yes, you have a live axle rather than an IRS, but every single review says that when you drive it the live axle isn’t a detriment, and that the Mustang in fact handles better through the twisties than th Camaro does. Older technology doesn’t mean worse. GM does wonder with a pushrod V8, you can get cloth top convertibles that are just as quiet and leave more trunk space than hard-tops, and I have a big cabinet 300+ lbs rear projection CRT HDTV that even being the better part of a decade old that, when calibrated, has a better picture than that 1″ thick LCD you can hang on your wall.

      I’d rather have the best live-axle ever to grace a passenger car than a mediocre IRS in a too-heavy car with poor visibility and an interior that doesn’t even measure up to the fairly low standards of pony cars.

  • avatar
    stationwagon

    I want to like the camaro but I can’t, it’s stock suspension is just too loose, it has mediocre cornering ability and it certainly does not have a “teutonic” feel to it, plus it weighs too much, which lowers the performance of high powered engines. I know pony cars traditionally are meant for straight lines but how can it be meant for speed if it weighs 3,750 pounds. the idea behind the pony car was to get a small light car and put a powerful engine in it and the closest current car to this goal is the mustang. I am not a mustang/ford fan-boy, the only camaro I didn’t prefer to the mustang was the third generation(1982-1992) camaro vs the fox body mustang. The mustang wins this round in the pony wars. The mistake GM made was basing it off a sedan platform, and not making it small and agile. Actually the only “teutonic” thing about the fifth gen camaro is the mood of the interior(very dark, black-on-black, like I see in most german cars, But the quality isn’t “teutonic”but I never gave a crap about interior quality, unless it was a luxury vehicle). I also want to like the mustang, but I see them so often it’s not even funny, everybody owns one. I want a car with sleek lines(not curved) with good cornering ability and low weight, and not a miata or an overpriced unreliable luxury car. What I really want is a mini-corvette with a v6.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I’d like the Camaro a lot more if the CTS and G8 never existed.

    That dark red color in the pic looks good though.

  • avatar
    LectroByte

    Here in what should be one of the Camaro’s best potential sales areas (East-by-god-Tennessee), the company parking lot boasts about 3 new Mustangs for every new Camaro, and no Challengers. From what I hear from the folks who have put their money where their mouths are, the Mustang is “way more car for the money”, or they were just pissed about those Chevy dealers wanting a nonrefundable deposit before even allowing a test drive. I can’t really comment on the convertible versions, since the folks I talk to think convertibles are for girls, and no self-respecting red-blooded manly man would be caught driving one.

  • avatar
    runwithscissors

    Ford should study this and learn how auto design can be an art.

    • 0 avatar
      The Guvna

      Seeing how Ford was the company responsible for giving the world the GT40, and its later GT homage, I’d say they already have some inkling about that. If I were responsible for giving the world what is still one of the three or four best looking cars ever made, I’m not sure I’d be looking to this redneck chariot for artistic inspiration…

      Kidding aside, the Camaro is indeed very good-looking. As long as you don’t look inside, anyway.

  • avatar
    Mark MacInnis

    Friend it? Yeah. Marry it? No way.

  • avatar

    If I was going to spend this kind of money I would get a completely restored first generation Camaro for the following reasons:
    - original Camaro will always go up in value, new Camaro will tumble in value very quickly
    - original Camaro is built with real metal and high quality parts all made in USA unlike Chinese and Mexican components in new GM products
    - original Camaro can be worked on by backyard mechanic and parts will always be available, new Camaro is too complicated even the dealers can’t fix them
    - original Camaro is much more fun to drive with no nanny controls and raw power and that 1960′s GM smell
    - original Camaro is much better looking


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Authors

  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • J & J Sutherland, Canada
  • Tycho de Feyter, China
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Faisal Ali Khan, India