By on April 30, 2010

With over 8,000 pre-orders already logged, Reuters reports that Nissan is well on its way to selling out its capacity-constrained, 25,000-unit first-year production run of Leaf EVs. Better yet, Nissan’s North America director of product planning and strategy Mark Perry says that, with those sales volumes, the Leaf will actually turn a profit for Nissan. He tells Reuters:

We are making money at the price that we announced. We priced the car to be affordable. We priced it for mass adoption

Considering it took Toyota (an undisclosed number of) years to turn a profit on its hybrid synergy drive technology, that’s quite the accomplishment. Of course, Nissan isn’t doing it all alone: hefty tax credits are certainly helping. In California, which is widely seen as the most promising market for EVs, federal and local tax credits combined could bring the Leaf’s $32,780 price to a Prius-beating $20,280.

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12 Comments on “Nissan Leaf “On Track” To Make Money In First Year On The Market...”


  • avatar
    tuckerdawg

    I dont understand, have any actually been sold yet? I am all for the leaf and ev’s in general but this sounds like mere puffery to me until the actual numbers are in.

  • avatar

    Hammer, hammer, hammer.

    Hammer, hammer, hammer.

    Hammer, hammer, hammer.

    That’s the sound of Tesla’s coffin getting nailed shut. I’ll drink out of a urinal if the Tesla S ever sees full scale production at a volume exceed 500 units a month.

    • 0 avatar
      Runfromcheney

      Replace “Tesla” with “Chevrolet Volt” and you are right on, brother.

    • 0 avatar
      Some Guy

      I imagine that the Leaf will be for typical urban dwellers who are afraid to leave the city. They think that there is nothing else to be seen outside the city limits. There are people I’ve met who live in the big city, and have never ventured out my way which is only an hour’s drive.

      The Volt will be for those like me who live and work more on the outskirts of the big city, get away with electric drive on a regular basis, but the trips into the big city are still do-able with the on-board generator.

    • 0 avatar
      wsn

      Some Guy, the Prius, not the Volt, will be for those like you who live and work more on the outskirts of the big city. Because the Prius is a better Hybrid than the Volt.

    • 0 avatar
      thestig2284

      @wsn “Some Guy, the Prius, not the Volt, will be for those like you who live and work more on the outskirts of the big city. Because the Prius is a better Hybrid than the Volt.”

      So you have drove a Volt already. Wow how did you manage that?

  • avatar
    kwong

    I’ve been strongly considering putting my name on the waitlist for the Leaf. My wife and I typically get by with one car in southern California (we primarily drive my TDI about 30K miles a year and her Integra logs in less than 3K miles a year). The Leaf would be perfect for our short distance driving and when we need to go more than 50 miles out, we would take the diesel for a drive. On top of all this, the tax credit/rebate would be perfect for us. We paid a little more than $38K in Federal and State taxes last year. We’re $200K in student loan debt and we rent a tiny apartment, so any tax deductions/credits/rebates are greatly appreciated.

    • 0 avatar
      Some Guy

      The thing is: if you’re driving only 3000 miles per year, you aren’t going to be saving thousands upon thousands of dollars in “fuel”–be it electrons or gas. The “time to payback” will be a LONG time. It’s more a matter of “Look at me! I have an electric car! Please love me, everyone!” When you have $200,000 creating interest that’s burning up your money, no matter how much you save on electric car subsidies from an essentially bankrupt federal and state government (putting the government in the hole even more) … it’s money that would be better put towards paying off that student loan… it’s not fashionable, but it’s the right thing to do.

      I’m in a 2-person, 2-vehicle household. She drives a smallish 4-cylinder car and drives it a lot. I drive a truck back and forth to work. Don’t use it for much more. Before the environmentalists lynch mob me, my commute is about 5 minutes each way. Whoopie. Buying an electric car for a daily 5 mile round-trip drive seems like a waste of money when my $5,000 used truck is already paid for. As an added bonus, I can haul home improvement stuff around when I need to, and I’m not breaking the bank for this “luxury” because my daily gas bill is minimal.

      This is Suze Orman, signing off… :-)

    • 0 avatar
      healthy skeptic

      Some Guy,

      Good point about the $5,000 used truck….but what if 5-7 years from now you could pick up a used Leaf for about the same?

    • 0 avatar
      mythicalprogrammer

      Whoa, $200k in student loans?! How the hell did you rack that up? Is there a PHD in there too? I know Universities paid for PHD and you get a little extra to live on too. I have like around $22K loan with my BS degree for my UC school and that took 5 years ^^.

      @Some Guy
      Dude, there are two number 30k and 3k I’m pretty sure he wants it for the 30k. That’s like twice the national average which leftlanenews did a cost to own hybrid over their non hybrid counterpart. It took 5 years to pay back a prius @ 15k miles a year compare to the matrix counterpart. So for the Nissan leaf it could take them a little more than two years so it’s not bad.

    • 0 avatar
      tuckerdawg

      200k in student loans is pretty average nowadays, a ba/bs doesn’t always get it done anymore employment wise so its not inconceivable that one feels the need to go to grad school which would put someone around that mark. School’s rarely pay for phd’s and such, they are all about making money, or making their student’s money to be exact. I wouldn’t be surprised if student loans go the way of subprimes, it is big business today. Also, if your second car logs less than 3k a year you should just keep it and supplement it with a bicycle lol. Bike gets more mpg’s than anything else out there, infinite minus the cost of food of course.


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