By on October 4, 2021

GM/ChevroletNinety years. That’s the amount of time that General Motors has led the sales charts in the U.S.

That may change this year, according to industry bible Automotive News, because of the ongoing microchip shortage.

Toyota has outsold GM in the U.S. for two consecutive quarters now, despite a September decline of 22 percent as it, too, struggled. Still, it showed a small year-over-year increase through the first three quarters.

Meanwhile, GM had its worst three months since the darkest days of the Great Recession that roiled the industry, especially the Detroit-based automakers, over a decade ago.

GM trails Toyota by about 90,000 light vehicles as it enters the fourth quarter, and it’s seeing volume numbers not seen since the 1950s.

That said, AN also reports that GM execs seem to believe that the worst of the chip crisis occurred during Q3 and has now passed, and the execs also point out that most of the plants that suffered lengthy shutdowns due to the chip shortage during Q3 will be back online in Q4.

On yet the other hand, analysts do think the crisis will continue to linger and bedevil the industry for the rest of the year, and October could be an especially tough month.

From the story:

“There’s probably more downside risk still because of the multitude of issues going on between port problems, transport problems, getting workers in plants, other parts shortages, chips,” said Jeff Schuster, LMC Automotive’s president of the Americas operations and global vehicle forecasting. “We’ve got a pretty long road before the industry gets out of this.”

Among those automakers who reported quarterly numbers last week, the industry was down around 10 percent, thanks to the chip problems. More automakers, including Ford, Jaguar Land Rover, and Mercedes-Benz are set to report sales this week.

LMC, the analyst firm quoted by AN, expects about 15 million sales for light vehicles this year. That’s still an increase over the 14.6 million from 2020. The company sees a number of around 15.7 million for 2022.

Regular industry observers will note that in the heady post-recession boom times, automakers sold about 16 million units in a given year.

With inventory down, dealers are worried more about getting cars to sell than actually selling the inventory they already have.

Toyota, for its part, touts lessons learned a decade ago during the Fukushima disaster as helping it weather the storm.

Again from AN:

“What we learned from the earthquake is we needed to carry more inventory of slow moving parts — and chips were one of the commodities we identified early on,” Carter told Automotive News via email.

Still, the sales race isn’t a foregone conclusion. Toyota tends to have a smaller inventory than GM, and the automaker told AN that it has fewer than 100,000 units either on dealer lots or in transit.

GM, for comparison, has just under 129,000 units out there, but also has five times as many dealers to spread that inventory around to.

Meanwhile, the market often sees a shift towards truck-buying through the fall and winter, and that would likely favor GM, which has a deeper bench of truck models, even in the face of Toyota unveiling a new Tundra. Toyota has also already announced production cuts for October that are not insignificant.

[Image: GM/Chevrolet]

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76 Comments on “Will Chip Shortage Dethrone GM’s Sales Dominance?...”


  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Automotive News is living in the past.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      GM made $8,000 more per transaction compared to this time last year.

      • 0 avatar
        Luke42

        @NormSV650:
        “GM made $8,000 more per transaction compared to this time last year.”

        If they have to choose whether to put their critical-but-unavailable part into a low-margin car, or a high-margin car, they’d be crazy not to choose the high-margin car.

        Without the shortage, everyone who wants the high-margin gets one — so the only way to gain more profit is to sell high margin products + low margin products.

        • 0 avatar
          NormSV650

          Luke42, except the Japanese who do sell enough high margin large trucks and SUVs as they are not competitive. So they are stuck selling lower profit Corolla/Camry/RAV4, Civic/Accord/CR-V, and Sentra/Altima/Rogue.

    • 0 avatar
      tomLU86

      Auto sales–that’s a good AUTOMOTIVE topic I’m interested in. Of course, the automakers, seeing to maximize their share price, have made this data much harder for the press to obtain.

      I have a question for Mr. Healey, or the commentariat.

      When you publish monthly or quarterly auto sales, is that the number of vehicles that were bought or leased by the final consumer who will register/title the car, such as individuals, car rental firms, fed/state/local govt, businesses? Aka, cars sold by new car dealers.

      That’s what I think is meant, but want to clarify that it is NOT the number of vehicles sold by manufacturers to dealers (as in units that have been shipped with their window sticker reading XYZ Chevrolet, 1000 Jefferson Ave, Detroit MI)

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @tomLU86 – I do believe that manufactures count anything leaving the factory to any dealer as a sale. IIRC, FCA got in trouble for deliberate “channel stuffing ” to pad their sales figures to appease shareholders.

        • 0 avatar
          tomLU86

          @Lou_BC

          Yes, thanks. I know every car that rolls off the assembly line in the US (or 99% of them) is SOLD to some dealer. That’s why the window sticker states the dealer car is to be delivered to. The automakers don’t build them and and warehouse them.

          Let me re-state my question (and TIM HEALEY should answer it. If he knows–which as “journalist” I would hope he would).

          If in Q3 GM built (and thus sold to dealers) 450k units, down 150k units due to chip shortage.

          “End users” (mostly individuals, plus fleet like govt, auto rental, business) took delivery of 550k GM vehicles in Q3.

          (As a side note, this means the inventory of GM vehicles fell 100k, since GM sent 450k units but dealers moved 550k units)

          When this site, or auto news, or the carmakers themselves report quarterly sales, which number are they reporting? 450k or 550k.

          Thank you.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @tomLU86 – I’d assume that fleet sales are through dealerships as well. Dealers tend to “floor plan” so they have 90 days to sell before making payments. I’m not sure how that counts. I again assume that once someone has received the product it counts as a sale to the manufacturer.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            From my understanding the sales that are reported are sales to the end user, not the dealer. Source an article on this site about how Chrysler used to encourage (pay) dealers to mark a car as sold at the end of the month/quarter, and then to “unwind” the sale after the 1st of the next month.

            The dealer takes ownership once the vehicle hits the lot and that is when the floor plan starts ticking. Once they have sold a car they typically have 3 days to pay off the vehicle. Source an article I believe I read on this site, where a shady dealer was selling cars, but not telling the company, to put off having to pay off the floor plan.

            It is true that now most cars are “sold” before they are scheduled but it isn’t always that way. The reason the rebate and option “packages” were invented was due to Chrysler’s sales bank. When the orders dried up in the wake of the first energy crisis they didn’t stop the line, they kept it running. They had the people in the district sales offices configure cars they thought they could sell in their district. Then that district sales office had to go and sell those cars to the dealer, or try and switch the order they were trying to place to one of the vehicles in the sales bank. The dealer got a discount for buying from the bank. Then when the dealers were stuck with cars that no one had ordered Chrysler introduced the retail rebate for cars in dealer’s stock. (Note at the time the majority of cars were ordered to spec by the purchaser after having driven the salesman’s demonstrator).

      • 0 avatar
        ToolGuy

        tomLU86,

        Usually when you see monthly or quarterly auto ‘sales’ reported (or the old every-10-days reports), it refers to sales from manufacturers to dealers. This information comes from the manufacturers and is available pretty quickly.

        Summarizing sales from dealers to final customers or actual vehicle ‘registrations’ is (much) messier and takes longer.

        (You’ve got it pretty much backwards in your original question.)

        My knowledge level on this topic is 3/10 (low).

        Bonus questions for anyone who knows:
        – When precisely does the dealer take ownership of (and responsibility for) the vehicle? Where is the vehicle physically located at that point?
        – The manufacturer sold the vehicle to the dealer. The dealer sells it to you [oversimplified; title might be held by finance entity]. By what mechanism does the manufacturer discover who ‘you’ are – and how long does it take?
        – At what point in time does DHS have a VIN tied to a SS?

        (Which comes first – the VIN or the parts ordering? If a Giant Meteor hits the dealership, is the OEM nervous? If a Giant Meteor hits the exact end of the assembly line, is the dealer nervous – and does the level of concern depend on blast radius? These are Important Questions.)

        • 0 avatar
          ToolGuy

          I revise my knowledge level estimate to 2/10 (very low).

          Apparently Automotive News has shifted (some?) to ‘registrations’ data as the OEM’s have backed off their ‘sales’ reporting:

          https://www.autonews.com/marketing/guide-ans-new-monthly-data-feature

          Quote:
          “Registration figures have become more valuable as most automakers have stopped releasing monthly sales results. Registrations also give insight into Tesla, which does not report any U.S. sales figures.”

          If it says ‘registrations’ it is registrations.

          I am super-confused on the (old?) ‘sales’ data. Here is part of an old article (most of it is hidden for me) that strongly indicates that the ‘sales’ data were based on shipments to dealers:

          https://fortune.com/2014/04/30/an-insiders-guide-to-auto-sales-reporting/

          Quote:
          “One trick is to load unsold cars onto truck transporters and train carriers at month’s end, so the vehicles can be counted as sold.”

          (If the game was to report such vehicles as sold to *customers* that seems extra-scammy. Unrealistically so.)

      • 0 avatar
        1500cc

        It’s sales to the final customer. That’s how you get, for example, 5 Dodge Darts being reported as sold in 2021 despite being out of production for 4 years (https://www.goodcarbadcar.net/2021-us-vehicle-sales-figures-by-model/)

    • 0 avatar

      Even if they are living in the past GM is still garbage.

  • avatar
    Rick T.

    “LMC, the analyst firm quoted by AN, expects about 15 million sales for light vehicles this year. That’s still an increase over the 14.6 million from 2020.”

    Given to apocalyptic mass media reporting the last 18 months, the numbers are surprising.

  • avatar
    kcflyer

    If the new Tundra turns out to be a better overall half ton than the GM twins I fear that will be the beginning of the end for GM. I hope not, they obviously have some great engineering and design talent but leadership seems lost.

    • 0 avatar
      redapple

      Toyota Sells more than GM.

      Good. They should. They make a superior product. Far Superior.

    • 0 avatar
      Peter Gazis

      Tundra NO V8, NO DICE

      • 0 avatar
        CoastieLenn

        @Peter: You know, the F150 has the highest take rate with the Ecoboost. There are conspiracy theories that Ford plans it this way by limiting supply, but at the end of the day, if people want a V8, that’s what they’ll purchase.

        • 0 avatar
          Peter Gazis

          Ford’s Trucks come in 31 different flavors and 101 different variations. you could get Diesel, Electric, 4, 6 or 8 cylinders.
          Plus Ford can build 1 million trucks a year.
          At Toyota we have 2 flavors Chocolate or Vanilla.
          And San Antonio could only turn out 250,000 Tundras a year.

          • 0 avatar
            eng_alvarado90

            I wonder if the 250K max output in San Antonio has increased now that Tacoma production has entirely moved to Mexico?

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      @kcflyer Sir, imagine if the Dutch, via RAM become the second best-selling truck line in North America? Or deep, deep, deep in a sub-sub-sub basement at Toyota City they decide to knock 10K off every Tundra? Toyota more than has the money to do so, do they have the will?

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I think it’s highly unlikely the 3G Tundra will find sustained success beyond what the prior two generations did (so around 120k per year).

      The Tundra also has no HD or chassis cab offerings like GM does. About 30% of Silverado and Sierra sales are from the HD lines.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      The Japanese have a long way to go…now that EV trucks are here from other companies the Tundra might go way of the Camry/Accord during their 2018 redesign with double-digit declines.

      “While Americans can’t seem to get enough of the mid-size pickups from Japanese automakers, they absolutely shun their full-size trucks. According to data from WardsIntelligence, the highest market share Toyota has seen with Tundra was 9.1% and that was in 2007. It currently hovers in the 5% range. It’s even worse for Nissan. The best the Titan was able to muster was 3.5% of the market in 2005. Today it’s at 1.5%. With the Detroit Three commanding 94% of full-size pickup sales this year, it might almost make more sense for Toyota and Nissan to share a large truck platform.” Autoline

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Ford and Stelantis are in the same boat as well.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    A quick look at my local Chevy/GM website shows a 22 vehicle inventory. I’m surprised that Toyota will pass GM since my local Toyota dealer’s lot is pretty deserted as well. One can make the assumption that Toyota is favouring deliveries to the USA market over the Canadian market.

  • avatar
    bunkie

    “What we learned from the earthquake is we needed to carry more inventory of slow moving parts — and chips were one of the commodities we identified early on,”

    So, Toyota, the champion of JIT lean sourcing has discovered the dangers of favoring efficiency over resilience.

    The last 18 months have demonstrated how foolish it is to do so. The extreme cost-cutting s favored by the MBA whiz-kids over the last few decades has come home to roost. The result has been inflation across the board as there was little slack left and when production dropped, demand rose and prices took off.

    • 0 avatar
      ScarecrowRepair

      The chip shortage is due to government lockdowns,not the pandemic, and NO ONE can do anything to work around spasmodic government diktat disruptions.

      • 0 avatar
        Astigmatism

        “The chip shortage is due to government lockdowns,not the pandemic” is a little bit like saying “Guns don’t kill people, bullets kill people.”

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @bunkie – We’ve seen just how fragile the “just in time” system is. One can blame the pandemic/lockdowns but we’ve seen system breakdowns on a smaller scale from bad weather. The freighter plugging the Suez Canal was a huge blow. There currently is too much global insecurity to go back to “LEAN” systems.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        Lou stick to medicine, you don’t understand manufacturing!…..LOL Neither does Bunkie. Toyota’s lean manufacturing practices is what built that company to where it is today. Toyota gained a reputation for quality, which is directly related to lean manufacturing. They do it(manufacture) better than any other company in the world….. Period!

  • avatar

    it’s not the chips, it’s incompetent management and lack of marketing expertise.

    at General Motors the results don’t change, only the excuses.

    Buickman
    Founder
    GeneralWatch.com
    DollingerDifference.com
    jdollinger.com

    • 0 avatar

      Consumer Reports ranks GM pretty much at the bottom.

      Barra = Roger SmithII

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        CR only polls their paying subscribers but J.D. Power a d IHS Markit poll actual owners and GM is looking very favorable today.

        When Consumer Reports rates the quality of cars, it surveys its own subscribers. So it’s really capturing the opinions of a universe of its own subscribers who fill out surveys. JD Power captures a wider audience, but it’s also capturing the opinions of car owners who fill out surveys. I’m not convinced those are statistically valid methods. And that’s why I like the IHS Markit loyalty awards.

        Every year IHS Markit analyzes over 12 million new vehicle registrations to see what kind of car people had, and what kind of new car they went out and bought or leased. That allows Markit to measure which companies, brands and models have the highest loyalty. 12 million is a lot, and there are no surveys to fill out, so I like that methodology. 

        Guess which car companies have the highest loyalty? GM and Ford. They usually don’t do that well when CR or JD Power rate them. But having the highest loyalty speaks loud and clear about their quality. JD Power and Consumer Reports also rate Land Rover and Alfa Romeo at the bottom. But IHS Markit shows Land Rover has the highest loyalty with full size luxury SUV owners. And Alfa Romeo is the most improved….

        Years ago the Packard Motor Company’s advertising slogan was “Ask The Man Who Owns One.” That’s kind of sexist way to state it today, but it’s also considered one of the most effective taglines in the history of automotive advertising.  Autoline Daily

        • 0 avatar
          tomLU86

          The Consumer Reports surveys and reliability scores had some value decades AGO. Even then, they were hit or miss.

          CR has now become a wannabe car and driver–short on actual performance data (that takes work), long on verbiage. The old CR would cringe.

          More fluff. When I subscribed to CR 15 years ago, they never sent me a car survey.

          My family had good experience with “domestic” cars with average or below average ratings, people I know have had bad experience with…1991 Honda Prelude, and 2014 Regal, both highly rated.

          As for JDP…they are not reliable either. How can Chevy and GMC trucks not have the same rating? They are the same thing. And yet…some years Chevy is “considerably” better, other years GMC is, other years they are close.

          These sources have lots of data, yes. But how good is it? I’d use them, plus word of mouth (which is not reliable due to small sample size, but still).

          The Japanese have not made inroads in full-size trucks because:

          1–unlike small cars in the 1970s, where Detroits products were “sub-par” and Japanese offered more features and usually better reliability, in full-size trucks, the Japanese have not been able to offer better value (actually, often not as good) or better reliability.

          2–Toyota has chosen, for prudent political reasons, not to take the gloves off. If it did, I think Toyota can make a more rugged truck (once they master making frames that don’t rust, maybe they have) and Toyota can offer the same or better value, if it chooses.

          It chooses not to do so, as not to draw the wrath of the US government. If/when full-size truck sales/prices plummet, Toyota will still make money. Detroit may not.

  • avatar
    Socrates77

    GM has been on a decline for the last 25 years. Since Mary Barra took over also. They have close plants all over the world and they’re losing market share since then. People are beginning to see that their cars are low quality and that they’re overpriced. If you look at their commercials they never have anything important to say. Their cars and trucks never win top safety awards or reliability awards or anything important. They think people will buy their crap because of how cool they look. They only care about their stock going up so they can please the greedy investors. I wonder how long before they lose another brand. Shrinking every year.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      The Chevrolet Tahoe and Suburban, the GMC Yukon and Yukon XL, and the Cadillac Escalade account for 50% of all large SUV sales in the US. GM makes 340,000 of them every year and exports about 80,000 to 31 countries. They’re made in GM’s plant in Arlington, Texas, which is said to be the most profitable assembly plant in the world. We estimate they generate $20 billion in revenue for GM and about $4 billion in profits. Autoline Daily.

      https://www.forbes.com/sites/dalebuss/2021/01/31/barra-already-ranks-as-gms-most-important-ceo-in-a-half-century/

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I don’t think that GM will lose another brand but the question should be how long till a foreign corporation buys GM? Closing plants and losing market share has made GM more profitable along with cheapening their quality and cost cutting as their quality continues to spiral down. GM is less about being in the business of manufacturing vehicles and more about making higher profits at any cost. GM is positioning themselves as a lean manufacturing company that is reddy for a take over and golden parachutes for Barra and the top GM brass.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Quality has improved for just about all brands except for 5he Japanese today. GM has some of the best quality in years or decades all while planning for and leading the ICE to EV revolution in North America.

  • avatar
    SaulTigh

    The only dealership that has much of any inventory around here seems to the the local Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram dealer. The newest RAM pickup is thin, but Ram Classics, Wranglers, Chargers, Challengers and 300’s can be had in some quantity.

    Mazda has some inventory as well, as does Cadillac. Chevy, Ford, GMC and Honda are all down to virtually nothing. Not a good time to buy a vehicle.

    Or Rolex watches or Half and Half at the store.

  • avatar

    Many former GM car customers are now ending up in Toyota showrooms. Remember, GM culled almost its entire passenger car lineup, which is equivalent to at least 400,000 annual car sales.

    Simply math formula (Cruze Factor)
    Chevrolet Cruze sales 2018 – 177,000
    Toyota’s 2021 sales lead – 90,000
    GM would be ahead of Toyota by 87,000 sales units

    Cruze, Impala, Lacrosse, XTS sales – 2018 – 380,000 (Most are not
    going back to GM)

    With their carline up intact GM would probably be ahead of Toyota by 200,000 sales by now.

    Lets take half of the nearly 400,000 units GM lost when it culled its carline.
    The formula would now be 200,000 – 90,000
    GM would be at 110,000 sales units ahead of Toyota.

    There is little or no chance of GM catching up this year. The trend maybe repeated next year.

    I knew this was going to happen.

    • 0 avatar
      tomLU86

      @akear to some extent I agree. However, the car sales were trending down before the pandemic (with Toyota doing the best job of NOT losing car sales), so Cruze/Impala/etc volumes would be down.

      Still, they would help to some extent.

      • 0 avatar

        Even with reduced sales, the cancelled GM passenger car line would have put GM at least 200,000 sales units ahead of Toyota. Since leaving Europe GM has lost 4 million in sales. They have gone from selling 11 million vehicles to just 6 million in ten years. Even Nissan outsells GM on the international stage.

    • 0 avatar
      eng_alvarado90

      Although I disagreed with D3 automakers killing most of its sedans/HB, I believe a reduced lineup makes it a bit easier to handle the component shortages we are experiencing today.
      If these cars were still in production, GM would likely shift the compromised batch of components to full size pickups, then SUVs and then CUVs.

      Long story short: the global shortages of today would’ve likely killed most of those sedans anyway.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    In my mind, I picture Deadweight foaming at the mouth and tearing his restraints asunder cheering on GM’s steady demise. Will SAIC try a takeover or will they play the long game and buy what’s left of GM after the next bankruptcy?

    • 0 avatar
      CaddyDaddy

      When ChiComs at the least take out Taiwan’s ability to build chips for outdated CanBus compatible computer chips, GM will be begging for a SAIC buyout. Mgt. will love the buyout cash and GM will be no more. Look for Toyota to purchase soon to be shuttered Arlington Plant for more Texas Tundra Production.

      • 0 avatar
        Ol Shel

        The Chicoms are capitalists, if you hadn’t noticed.

      • 0 avatar
        redapple

        Daddy.
        GMArlington closed ???
        I thought that was where they make Tahoe- Escalade – Yukon.
        Therefore > this one plant would be by far – the largest profit maker at GM. I d bet you it makes more profit that 5-6 other GM plants.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Toyota sells all the Tundras it wants. Any more would involve regular cabs, cheapskates, fleets, special orders, and one-of-a-kinds with options and packages Toyota doesn’t currently offer.

        Heavy dutys would require lots of the above and a truck Toyota can’t badge engineer into a Lexus or something. And a Hot Rod diesel.

    • 0 avatar

      “I picture Deadweight foaming at the mouth and tearing his restraints asunder cheering on GM’s steady demise.”

      If someone cheers on someone else demise, this person certainly has serious emotional problems and needs help. But in todays world of Internet avatars will find that sad state of mind amusing and entertaining. It reminds me the “bread and circuses” stage of Roman Empire’s decline.

  • avatar

    How long will Barra’s reign of error continue. Just wait until GM starts producing its slow selling EVs. Who is going to buy a $71 EV hummer? GM is going to be a real shi* bath in a few years.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Both Hummer and Lyriq EV’s are sold out. Meanwhile GM is ranking in the cash on $100,000 SUVs.

      “…Per a recent report from Autotrader, the 2021 Cadillac Escalade is, on average, selling at 104 percent of MSRP, based on average transaction price. The next-gen Escalade ranks eighth of 20 vehicles listed by Autotrader as selling over MSRP, with the Mercedes-Benz G-Class listed as the top-ranked model at 118 percent of MSRP.

      Other General Motors vehicles making the Autotrader list include the new Chevy Corvette C8 at 102 percent of MSRP, the GMC Yukon XL at 101 percent of MSRP, and the Chevy Bolt EUV at 100.5 percent of MSRP….”  gmauthority

      • 0 avatar

        Pre-orders are essentially meaningless. Any car company can get people to pre-order a vehicle. There is a high disparity in pre-order and actual sales. Automakers use pre-orders to create hype for a certain vehicle. There is no way GM is going to find more than 10,000 customers for a $70,000 EV Hummer.

        • 0 avatar
          ToolGuy

          @akear,

          Are you saying no way 10K first-year production, or no way 10K ever?

          https://www.cnet.com/roadshow/reviews/2022-gmc-hummer-ev-preview/

          (Edition 1 starts at $112,595 [including destination], not $70K)

        • 0 avatar

          I am talking about annual sales. I predict about 5000 EV hummers will be sold a year. To tell you the truth I can’t understand why anyone would want such a vehicle.

          • 0 avatar
            ToolGuy

            “I can’t understand why anyone would want such a vehicle.”

            Commissioned a quick market research study:
            • Arthur likes the prospect of $28 fill-ups.
            • Betty’s ex-husband’s family owns a serpentine belt supplier, and she will do anything to accelerate their decline (it was an extremely bitter split).
            • Carl is stalking Betty and appreciates the low noise level of the Hummer EV.

  • avatar

    The 2021 Chevy Silverado 1500 and closely related 2021 GMC Sierra 1500 are among the least reliable vehicles available today, according to Consumer Reports.
    Buy an Outlander instead.

    What a disgrace. Barra has to go.

    • 0 avatar
      redapple

      AKEAR

      How can GM quality be so much worse? As a ASQC CQE (20 years ago) I ask a simple question that maybe nobody at sheet bag GM ever asked.
      How can the quality be so bad?. 75% of the truck is comprised of PURCHASED PARTS FROM SUPPLIERS. THE SAME SUPPLIERS that Ram and Ford use.

      BOOM. Comment of the day at TTAC !!!!!!

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        redapple get the ^^^^”post of the day”^^^^ award!

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @redapple – there is truth to that. When Toyota got hit by it’s “unintended acceleration” fiasco, they found that vast majority of problems came from the same American supplier. Ford and other companies using similar products from the same supplier also had issues. The Japanese Denso products of the same design had very little problems.

    • 0 avatar
      mikey

      @akear …..I was so waiting for “what a disgrace ” ….i just knew you would slide in there !!

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I don’t cheer the demise of any car company especially when it means less competition and higher prices but GM will at some point be merged with another car company whether it be Chinese or some other non USA based company. Having owned some type of GM vehicle over the past 46 years and my parents and grandparents owning Chevys, Buicks, and Oldsmobiles it is sad to see what has happened to them. I have been for the most part satisfied with my GM vehicles but at the present time they offer little of what I want or need and their quality has gone way down. GM knows how to make good vehicles and there is no company better when they have gotten it right but it has been years since they have. Ford is not a lot better and Chrysler has for the most part disappeared with Fiat and now Stelantis.

  • avatar
    BSttac

    Really eye opening how unintelligent Americans are. Who in there right mind would buy these horribly uncompetitive, poorly built products? The C8 is the only vehicle that is worth its msrp. Even the Escalade is a poorly built Tahoe with a wide-screen up front to distract you from its cheapness inside. Just shows you you can’t save the customer from themselves.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Let’s go Brandon!

  • avatar

    I only know what I see at my local dealers.
    GM/Caddy/Corvette Center- a few work trucks in the forecourt, the showroom is artfully assembled with cubicles…no cars. One vette in stock, the trucks out front are used..
    Lexus Dealer- Nothing
    BMW Dealer – has resorted to hard cases in the forecourt from Auction, instead of the creampuff trades normally seen in this affluent area.
    Jeep/Chryco dealer- nada, a few used trucks, a few auction Kias.

    May you live in interesting times….

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  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Corey Lewis
  • Jo Borras
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber