By on July 29, 2021

Mitsubishi Mirage. Image: Mitsubishi

Car buyers and market observers are used to seeing large dealership markups on models that are tough to get — first editions of popular cars, usually, or models that are produced in small numbers, or both.

It’s no shock to see the Ford Bronco or Chevrolet Corvette marked up by thousands of dollars. Motor Trend reported markups of $30K on Broncos, for example. C8 Corvettes are also being marked up like crazy.

While annoying, it’s somewhat understandable, given how the franchise-dealer system works, as well as how basic capitalism and supply and demand work. You don’t have to like the phenomenon, but the logic behind its existence is sound.

Still, we draw the line at an almost $6K markup of a Mitsubishi Mirage.

You read that right. A dealership in Tennessee marked a Mirage — a freakin’ Mitsubishi Mirage — up by nearly $6,000 over its manufacturer suggested retail price (MSRP), charging $24,260 for one after a $5,995 upcharge.

This is a result of the greater issues surrounding the industry right now. Inventories are at historical lows, due in part to the semiconductor chip shortage, and pricing for both new and used cars is all sorts of insane.

Still, it’s a bit jarring to see this kind of markup on a car that’s a) produced in large enough numbers that it is far from “rare” and b) marketed as basic transit to those who either can’t afford much or who simply only want the cheapest car they can get, regardless of income.

The Mirage isn’t in high demand, and it isn’t rare or built in low numbers. So this is either a dealership trying to get as much as it can out of each sale, knowing supply is tight, or a store screwing over low-income consumers, some of whom may have shaky credit, as Jalopnik asserts. Or it’s both.

Either way, it’s another reason to not buy a car in the short term unless you absolutely have to.

[Image: Mitsubishi]

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73 Comments on “Dealership Markups Are Getting Insane...”


  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    They can mark up all they want; only fools pay it when there are other options available.

  • avatar
    cleanOnTheInside

    Woe the day that laws pass that allow direct to consumer sales, and dealership owners are complaining about all the jobs that will be lost, and how “vital” that personal connection is.

    • 0 avatar
      Yankee

      @cleanOnTheInside:

      My fondest wish. I worked for dealerships for many years as a technician, service advisor, and service manager, and I would love nothing more than to see them all out of business. They are traditionally run by former salesmen and their family members, and have yet to abandon all the shady tactics of days gone by. Now the game has only gotten worse with large dealer groups buying up all the mom and pop stores and greatly expanding their power to fleece consumers. (I wouldn’t be surprised if in a decade or so there are only a dozen dealer groups across the country given the pace acquisitions are happening now.) I would love to see this ancient, deeply flawed system gone. At the same time, expand the right to repair laws so that independent honest shops have access to the diagnostic information they need. Imagine a world where consumers bought whoever made the best vehicle they could afford, and then took it for service to the shop that gave them the best service for their money.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    Would be interesting to see if independent mechanic shops have had substantial uptick in business as more drivers decide to keep their clunkers running for another year or two.

    That is crazy, I would expect a steep discount to drive home that vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      jmo2

      I think it would be swamped by the dramatic rise in the number of people working from home. Almost all repairs are primarily mileage driven wear and tear rather than purely a function of age.

    • 0 avatar
      Yankee

      @thegamper:
      As someone who works for a government contractor on vehicle-related programs in multiple states, I can tell you the answer is an emphatic YES. Shops have more work now than they ever did pre-Covid. The average age of a vehicle on US roads just went to 12 this year. The problem is that there are very few hands to do the work. ASE has documented a nationwide technician shortage going back to the 1990s, but the problem now has never been worse. I know many shops that pay well and offer benefits, and still can’t get guys (young and old) to show up for work. Every station manager tells me the same story. At a time of record demand for auto repair, a good friend of mine is scaling back his large and successful auto repair business because of lack of help, even though he pays well and covers all benefits (no employee contribution). He’s tired of working from 8 am to 9 pm to diagnose and repair vehicles his “mechanics” can’t.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        What you’ve described I’ve read all over in multiple fields, its not just “would you like fries with that” crappy jobs but actual professions who are impacted by the Plandemic UBI experiment. However I did want to ask about this point:

        “He’s tired of working from 8 am to 9 pm to diagnose and repair vehicles his “mechanics” can’t.”

        So are you saying in some cases there are mechanics but they are incompetent or are you reinforcing there aren’t any physical mechanics willing/able to work?

        • 0 avatar
          Yankee

          @28-Cars-Later:
          It’s both. The number of young people going into the industry has been falling steadily and tech schools are closing (two near me alone). Can’t blame the kids, when you offer them a job where you have to spend a fortune in tools to get started and then you only get paid based on what the flat-rate book says the job is worth, regardless of how many rusted bolts broke off because you’re repairing cars in a rust belt state. (My friend pays his guys hourly so they’re guaranteed wages no matter what their working on.) When you do get someone looking for a job, they say they have experience because they removed and painted the valve cover on their ragged-out Eclipse. You have to check what they “diagnosed” before you sell it to a loyal customer, and then you have to check their work because they’re young and inexperienced.

          The industry is starting to change, and some manufacturers have begun pushing to get rid of flat-rate pay for mechanics (Lexus was an early adopter of the idea you get rushed work that way). But it’s too little too late, as many young people were warned off the field by guys my age who didn’t want to see their kids go through what they did for a living. So what you have are the kids that are left, more than those who are passionate about the craft, who are few and far between these days.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          There’s a shortage in every skilled trade. Too many years where kids and parents were brainwashed to believe that the only way to a good life was with a college degree.

          My oldest wants to go into trades. The dealer he works at promised to sponsor him as a mechanic but are fooking with the staff. One mechanic quit. As @Yankee pointed outside, dealers are run and owned by salesmen.

          Kids are also spoiled. In the 90 ‘s I used to ride with some younger guys who expected everything handed to them. A few whined to my face that I had it lucky with a house, truck, and several bikes. I lost my sh!t on them and pointed out that I worked 2 jobs, put myself through college without student loans, and now had 3 jobs.

          The work ethic isn’t there.

          • 0 avatar
            jkross22

            “Kids are also spoiled.”

            Lou, how can you possibly expect kids to work under these conditions? There are video games, legal pot, YouTubers making millions who number in the 10s. They just got a bad lot in life for not having LeBron James’ talent, Mark Cuban’s sense of timing and not being as lucky as Steven Spielberg or Andy Rubin.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @jkross22 – exactly. You got kids making millions because other kids watch them play video games.

            The majority will need to wake up, put on their socks, pants, and shoes one leg at a time and go to work.

            I buy lottery tickets and Do NOT expect it to fund my life.

          • 0 avatar
            Dave M.

            I wouldn’t necessarily pin it all on the kids and parents and college plans. No Child Left Behind decimated voc-ed. My career in education started right when NCLB kicked in. It was so sad to see the trades get swept aside.

          • 0 avatar
            Yankee

            Lou_BC,

            You are correct about the sales pitch from the colleges and universities. My parents believed it and here I am with a master’s degree in history working on cars! The trade schools themselves are also largely to blame. A big chain called Wyotech was a complete scam, teaching kids OBD-I (that’s not a typo) and not teaching them anything about drum brakes, and bilking them for $40k. They also got government money for taking wayward kids (choice: got to jail or go to Wyotech). So some kids were throwing paper wads in the back of the room while farm boys who could instinctively figure out machinery and wanted to better their life were trying to earn a credential to do it. Both groups came out with the same degree. One of three instructors I personally knew who quit told me he was not allowed to fail anyone, because then they wouldn’t get the government money.

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            Lou – at work the skilled Trade shop employees make well into $150K plus per year. Plumbers really clean up with some cresting $200K. So you certainly can make great money in the trades. And if you are good working with your hands a day building cabinets – or whatever your specialty is – can be remarkably rewarding. But if you think of it, why would anybody gravitate toward automotive repair? Its physically difficult especially as you age, its hard on your hands and skin, the pay really isn’t that good, and you get zero respect from most people. In addition to good mechanical aptitude you need to understand how electricity and computers work and you need to constantly update your skills. If you are good at those things, engineering (my profession) and computer fields are far more enticing than starting your day bent over trying to extract a stripped bolt or figuring out why a car battery ends up dead only on a Tuesday following a full moon. I really enjoy a good diagnostic “workout” and fixing virtually everything I own, but on an occupational level? No thanks!

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        Yankee,
        family friend here, retired. His shop called him back and gave him everything he requested. As long as he shows up for work. They even asked me to come on Saturdays (knowing that I fix my cars). Of course I wouldn’t but I said, “let me think about”. The owner had some fire in his eyes when I said this. He had so much hope.

        • 0 avatar

          Yankee, you are like two of my best auto service guys…my tire shop guy went to a year of dentistry school…and hated it. The guy who runs the local oddball cars shop was a med student….strong parental support, nay, demand. They hated it and are both much happier (and making a good living) in the auto field.

          • 0 avatar
            Yankee

            Reminds me of the old joke about the gynecologist who became an auto mechanic: He was really good, but very slow, because he worked on engines through the tailpipe….Golden2Husky hit the nail on the head. Doctors have it easy, they only have one make and two models that haven’t changed. OF course, the do have to work with the engine running.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @speedlaw – I knew a Doctor who started out as a licensed welder and steel worker. She’s an excellent MD. Another was a structural engineer. I always find it amusing since he became an orthopedic surgeon.

    • 0 avatar
      Syke

      That’s definitely happening. I’ve got a number of very un-motorhead friends, usually driving 10-15 year old models of cars we laugh at here (Saturn, Chevy Cavalier, Chrysler PT Cruiser, etc.) who were planning on celebrating the ‘end’ of COVID by finally replacing their old rides.

      Every one of them (mostly female) took one look at the current used car market, and promptly made an appointment with their currently well-trusted independent mechanic to give the car a good go over, indulge in some not absolutely necessary preventative maintenance (transmission flushes, etc.) and even getting a bit of rust and paint repair in places.

      And they’ll come back this time next year and see what the market looks like.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I’ve got a superfluous ride along those lines which I nearly sold at a steep discount last summer because I wasn’t using it and wanted to slim down to two cars (I know that sounds ridilcious but its true). Nearly sold it in May but my price could not be agreed upon, may end up paying to put it in storage this winter because I don’t want it out in the driveway and the garage is now full. I suspect this “market” is going to continue well into next year if not longer.

    • 0 avatar

      I know three local mechanic shops well…the answer is….YES !

  • avatar
    ajla

    In Florida nearly every dealer puts tons of added crap onto all their vehicles.

    Here was the “accessory” sticker on my Stinger when I bought it in 2018:
    i.ibb.co/j8xRFq7/Kia-Markup.jpg

    So $1500 pinstripes, $900 window tints, and $3500 straight-up markup. Then on top of that there was an $900 dealer fee. So $6800 of BS on a $40K MSRP car. But remember this wasn’t just on Stingers. *Every* Kia had a markup sticker. From a Rio to a K900.

    You might say “why not go somewhere else?”. Like I said just about every dealer in Florida does it. The Dodge dealer did it when I bought my Charger, the Hyundai dealer did it with my sister’s Kona. Every Genesis place does it. BMW does it, Ford, Mazda, Chevy, Cadillac, Infiniti, Nissan, Jaguar, Volvo, and VW. The only two places where I haven’t seen a markup sticker was Mercedes and Alfa Romeo but I’m sure they still have $1000 dealer fee.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      “just about every dealer in Florida does it”

      If what you’re saying is true, this non-lawyer thinks that practice sounds like price-fixing or collusion, and worthy of investigation.

      I’m dismissive of markup stories because I always assume people have a choice.

      • 0 avatar
        psychoboy

        It’s no more collusion than every gas station in town being within pennies of each other.

        This is just another bargaining chip. A dealer can cut the markup and the buyer feels like they got a deal.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      Living in FL and about to buy a new vehicle (Hyundai Santa Cruz) I can’t wait to see this madness. I bought my last new car in 2000, a Dodge, and there was no funny business back then. Since then its been used vehicles with no such markups or nonsense add ons. I write the check so I am in control. The SC is in short supply (production just started) so I expect all sorts of “market adjustments”, but I’m not paying a penny over MSRP and will not pay for ANY dealer adds on, even their stupid $65 wheel locks are an immediate NO for me.

      This kind of crap should be illegal, however it must work or they wouldn’t keep doing it. But who actually puts up with this? I guess people get these fees removed thinking they “won” but now they are just back to the real selling price. Powerful jedi mind trick this is.

      • 0 avatar
        redapple

        I love the flickering center high mounted stop light (rear). Part of a dealer added $afety package. But the flickering CHIMSL is illegal.

        • 0 avatar
          tankinbeans

          Re: flickering CHMSL commonly known as the cyclops in Minnesota

          I always find it fun when the light is flickering and the maroon driving it hasn’t even cared enough to remove the sticker advertising said feature.

          I usually about those cars, only because the flickering makes it look like the driver is engaged in Morse code braking and isn’t paying attention.

          • 0 avatar
            theflyersfan

            That thing is by far one of the most annoying add-ons ever. I wouldn’t deal with a local Mazda dealer because they refused to not install it on every single new car that hit their lot. It was an instant $300+ add-on/padding that they said everyone had to pay. Not I…

            Both VW dealers in this area add Weathertech-like plastic mats, auto dimming mirror, trunk protection kit, and cargo “Legos” to each car that hits their lot. At least the plastic mats have saved my carpets in the car.

            The worst was a local Honda dealer that called me saying that they were willing to let a Civic Type-R go for MSRP. The dealer was 1/2 mile from where I was working at the time, so it wasn’t out of my way to look at it. The windshield sticker showed MSRP. However, on the back window was a massive laundry list of over (if I recall) $5,000+ of body and interior add-ons that did nothing to and for the car, and was just padding. And they wouldn’t budge. Combined with the fact that they have a no test drive policy on the CTR and the decision was easy to walk away.

      • 0 avatar
        millerluke

        @JMII: Good luck! A local Toyota dealer has by far the best salespeople and experience of any dealership I’ve ever gone to, they are amazing. That said, they flat out admit that they will NOT sell a vehicle at MSRP, because there’ll be another bloke who’ll pay several grand over. One fellow wanted a new Tacoma with certain options for MSRP – the dealer said no, the guy can get what the dealer has for the dealer’s price. Fellow walked away, came back a few weeks later (after finding every other dealer was more expensive and shady) and agreed to the next Tacoma that came in for $5000 over MSRP.

        I’m looking to get a work truck or SUV, but refuse to pay stupid money for something that will probably lose half (or more!) of it’s value in a year. So my two year old Camry with 100k soldiers on…

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Funny how businesses have incredible customer service when they’re overcharging.

          Way back in the day, I worked for MCI in customer service, and the most common complaint I got was that they missed AT&T’s service. In fact, AT&T went all-in on customer service because it was a monopoly that was screwing its’ customers over royally, and they knew that the quickest way to lose that was to have hacked-off customers. Once they were broken up, their customer service went down the toilet.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Telus has gotten bad due to near monopoly status. If I don’t like their service I threaten to pull the plug and go to a competitor. It’s worked so far.
            My home alarm malfunctioned and I was told $100/hr service fee. I told them not to send a tech since a rival would do a free new install if I signed a 3 year plan. I got a tech from them for free with that comment.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @Lou:
            When I moved into my new place, I signed up for Xfinity, but they blew the install. I work from home, so no internet – no paycheck. I found out Century Link offered a built-in modem and Internet outlets in my unit, so despite having AWFUL experiences with them in the past, I signed on with a prepaid plan they could flip on in a few minutes.

            They have not hit my credit card once since November.

      • 0 avatar
        Stonyb31

        Please let us know if ALL of your conditions are met. Good luck with that!

  • avatar
    toronado

    I feel like dealers can do this if the market allows it on certain vehicles, but I have not seen a Mitsubishi product in memory I would pay MSRP for let alone above MSRP. I tested the waters a couple weeks ago and was quoted MSRP for a new 2021 Outback and decided no thanks. They had 5 new cars on the lot so I cant say that I blame them really it just wasnt something I had to have. I feel like you cannot get emotional and angry over it when the same buyers have no problem trying to grind $10,000 discounts off of cars, it works both ways.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Uh… the Mirage is a 12K car to begin with, not a 16K one (Ok, add a grand for auto, so 13K with auto). But even in (SELECT SYSDATE FROM DUAL) who on Earth would write paper equivalent to $24,000 JPow bux for the ***Mitsubishi Mirage***.

  • avatar
    jalop1991

    I’m stunned seeing apparent adults who are SHOCKED! and OUTRAGED! at how the market works.

    Yes, you’re not getting your way. Didn’t your mother prepare you for the REAL world? If not, that’s not the world’s fault or problem to fix.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Calm down.

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      Yeah. I mean, it sucks, I’d like to replace my ride but now is clearly not a good time. With a shortage of new cars dealers have less product to sell, which means they gotta make more profit off each vehicle to keep the lights on. Not saying I feel sorry for them, but can’t really blame them for charging what the market will bear.

  • avatar
    Fah-Que

    The current Mitsubishi Mirage is a car that should not induce anger, nausea, intestinal gas or feelings of inadequacy.

    Its contempt. Pure contempt. Looking at the car makes me feel contempt. Starting it, after a fit of giggles
    brings about a sense of contempt. Driving it elicits a sense of contempt.
    I’ve finally come to the conclusion that were we to assign it a human personality it would be of the poor student
    who just found out that their major in medieval basket weaving and minor in beat poetry was not going to help them
    pay down that $85000 in student debt. The sound they makes is that sigh that would be simultaneously uttered just as
    they began that epic crap after a night of binging white rice and irony.

    I recently referred to it as a “fart box” and not a “sh*t box” because its too small to be anything more than one of
    those nasty little wet farts that make you want to check your underwear for stains.
    On that note, curiosity dictates that I attempt to find out how to say “fart box” in Japanese.
    According to Google’s translate site its: “Onara bokkusu” which literally translates into “Flatulence box”.

  • avatar
    Crosley

    Wait this silliness out.

    Don’t be like the idiots during the ‘aughts that payed a big markup to get their hand on a PT Cruiser.

    There’s going to be plenty of cars to go around.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Half-assed 300-word writeup based on a Jalopnik post? No sale.

    [Didn’t click on any of the 87 TTAC links included in the 300 words, but did clear cookies (computer breathed a sign of relief).]

  • avatar

    It is a good time to start importing used cars from Germany and Japan. Or new Yugos and Ladas from Russia (I would still prefer used Japanese cars from Germany).

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      “Car Production in Iran decreased to 863263 Units in 2020 from 955923 Units in 2019”
      They have some room to pump more for us

    • 0 avatar
      Oberkanone

      Or stop exporting used vehicles from United States.

      https://www.forbes.com/sites/niallmccarthy/2020/10/29/where-americas-used-vehicles-get-exported-to-infographic/?sh=59ee77c335b4

      • 0 avatar

        Used cars from Germany and Japan usually are in better conditions than used cars from US.

        • 0 avatar

          Sure…a Japan or German car has failed the stringent inspection tests…but has life yet. An American car can’t pass inspection here, which means emission$….a much lower bar.

          I read somewhere that the reason German car makers stick us with the red turn signals when the home market car has ambers (why carry two lights in inventory ?) is this reason…it is harder to export them when the US market is done with them.

          I know someone who regularly exports his “done” cars to a relative in Albania…what is fixable and labor costs are far different…so your “total” is “we can fix that”.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    I test-drove the previous generation Mirage, back when they could be had for $9999. I didn’t think it was a *good* car, but it had a charming honesty about it that very few cars sold today possess.

  • avatar
    Ol Shel

    What’s the ‘logic’ of charging people far more than you need to survive as a business?

    To give raises and benefits to your workers, I am sure!

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      General breakdown of society.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      The logic would be this:

      I normally have 100 cars on my lot, and sell 50 per month (2-month supply). But today I only have 50 cars on my lot, and only half of them are in demand.

      The store employs so many people, and the utilities cost the same regardless of customer traffic.

      I’d like to retain my sales staff, so may I offer them a better commission when they sell something. But that means the price needs to go up, or I go broke.

      Furthermore, if I sell at MSRP or lower, then my inventory will be gone in a few weeks, and the mfr is iffy about the supply pipeline. So in order to make my inventory a little longer, I raise the price to slow buying to the point that we still make money, but don’t burn out the business in a month. Since all the kids are doing the same thing, I will, too.

      From a dealer perspective, this makes sense. But customers don’t have to put up with it.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    So now we need to eliminate car dealerships because a handful of them are upcharging on crap box cars or adding on silly profit making items?

    Well newsflash they don’t all do this and some of us still like to make a day out of cruising around and personally checking out and sitting in the vehicles. Looking at something on my cell phone does not at all represent how it is in person, what it sounds like, feels like, how comfortable the seats are, represent the actual shade the paint is and numerous other things. After Looking at and sitting in said vehicles and narrowing down what I like and want to buy then I go in, test drive it and negotiate the price. If they won’t give it to me for a fair price I get up and walk and will eventually find the deal I want someplace else. Have been doing it this way for the past 30 years and have never got screwed once!

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      It’s not a “handful”, it’s nearly all dealerships. Locally, new Lincolns have $5995 and $9995 added to every vehicle, for no reason other than profit motive.
      Adding unnecessary accessories to every vehicle is, apparently, what all dealerships do in Florida.
      Screw ’em, I just buy used from private parties, and save a hell of a lot of money that way.

  • avatar
    JMII

    Look at this madness: https://www.santacruzforums.com/attachments/d9c4b10b-4a3a-4f10-86a5-70f2b2d6b90b-jpeg.1093/

    $899 in paint protection?
    $3,495 in the value package?
    $10,000 in market adjustment?

    How do these people sleep at night?

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      “Kids are also spoiled.”

      Lou, how can you possibly expect kids to work under these conditions? There are video games, legal pot, YouTubers making millions who number in the 10s. They just got a bad lot in life for not having LeBron James’ talent, Mark Cuban’s sense of timing and not being as lucky as Steven Spielberg or Andy Rubin.

  • avatar
    teddyc73

    All sorts of insane? That’s some great writing right there folks.

  • avatar
    Garrett

    Vote with your wallets.

    If you see this going on, call them out about it and tell them you’re going elsewhere. And do so. Feel free to follow up with them later and let them know that you bought a car from someplace else that didn’t do this nonsense.

    Local Lexus dealer puts GPS trackers in all the cars, and then makes you pay $500 for the privilege. For starters, I don’t want some janky GPS tracker that a dealer decided to install, offered by a company that I’ve never heard of.

    Frankly, I like to give my business to place that actually want it. When we bought our XC60, it was the first model year of the new generation. If you wanted an XC40, you needed to get on the list because they had already sold through everything they were going to get for the next several months, and they didn’t really have many XC60s in stock either.

    I asked if they could budge off of MSRP, and was told that they couldn’t. Then the guy said, “Hey, are you Costco members?” I told him we were, and he said, “You should have lead with that!”

    The result was 6% off, plus a few grand off (forget the amount), plus a Costco gift card for $750.

    That’s how you treat customers if you want them to come back.

    BS pin stripes, tacky wheel packages, and market value adjustments? No.

  • avatar
    Kendahl

    Let’s all “help the dealers out” by maintaining what we already own and deferring replacement for a year or two until new vehicle production once again meets demand.

  • avatar
    wolfwagen

    $6K mark up on a Mirage?!
    I think it rather drive any of the 1997 Burn Cars from this past weeks B/D/B series

  • avatar
    schmitt trigger

    Again, laws of supply and demand. Capitalism working as it should.

    But every bubble eventually bursts.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Agree the bubble forms only if people buy into it. I never have paid MSRP until now when I ordered a Ford Maverick last week but the dealer did not upcharge me nor did they charge me for add ons. I will also get $500 off for being a member of the Kentucky Farm Bureau. The only negative that I will have is that the soonest I will get the Maverick is the end of the year but I was told it might be next Spring but I can wait. Put $500 down and the salesperson told me that if I would quality for incentives or special financing at the time I get it and that they will let me know. Ford had been running a 0.9% which I might take if offered since it is better than using my own money but I can afford to pay cash. Since the Maverick will be my retirement vehicle and probably the last new vehicle I will buy I can wait.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @Lou_BC–What you and Yankee said about the skilled labor shortage and about many of the younger workers is spot on. There are a few younger workers who are really good but it is few. There is an independent garage that I go to that has a couple of long time experienced mechanics but most of the rest come and go. Many of the youth are told to get a college degree but are not steered toward fields that they can get a good paying job with potential for growth. Art History, History, Literature, and other humanities degrees might make a person more knowledgeable and a better informed individual but they do not qualify you for a good job. I have 3 degrees Business Management, Petroleum Land Management, and Accounting and it was the Accounting degree that advanced my career and opened doors for me. When I was younger my goal was to get away from Accounting but after numerous jobs where I was laid off because of downsizing or a bad economy I was able to finally able to get a good job and advance myself because of my Accounting degree and experience. Few jobs are exciting but much of what you do is your attitude. You can find satisfaction in any job.

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  • N8iveVA: “Electric vehicles are now mainstream” uh yeah, except they’re not. Not yet. Maybe change that...
  • Jeff S: That’s a lot of miles on a 2010 you more than got your money’s worth and you will likely go even...

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