By on January 12, 2021

 

Lordstown Motors

Lordstown Motors announced on Monday that they had exceeded 100,000 pre-orders for their Endurance light-duty, all-electric pickup, slated to begin production in September.

Lordstown Motors

While we covered the Endurance previously, we didn’t pay homage to where it’s being assembled. Lordstown has a long history as the place where Chevrolet and Pontiac vehicles came together. The Vega, Monza, Cavalier, Cobalt, Cruze, and Pontiacs like the Sunbird and Sunfire were made in the General Motors plant in Lordstown, Ohio.

Lordstown Motors

Looked upon as the place where high-volume, low-margin price leaders were constructed, integrity wasn’t an issue. Driving a Sunbird on the I-880 Freeway near Oakland, California, when traffic came to a halt, the Lincoln Continental driver hadn’t noticed until it was too late, hitting the Pontiac and folding it up like an accordion. While the car was totaled, I emerged without a scratch, thanks to the men and women of Lordstown.

Keeping that in mind, it’s understandable why Lordstown founder and CEO, Steve Burns, chose this assembly plant to create the Endurance. A dedicated workforce comprised of experienced laborers, technicians, and engineers, Lordstown was in operation from 1966 to 2019 under GM’s aegis, then idled for what workers would call a changeover. Lordstown Motors bought the 785-acre, 6.2-million square foot facility to manufacture the world’s first full-size, all-electric pickup for commercial fleet use.

Burns said, “Receiving 100,000 pre-orders from commercial fleets is unprecedented in automotive history. Adding the interest we have received from federal, state, municipal and military fleets on top of that, I think you can see why we feel that we are about to revolutionize the pickup truck industry.”

The Endurance is a full-size, all-electric pickup with a projected range of 250 miles, the equivalent of 600 horsepower, and the ability to tow up to 7,500 pounds. The Endurance will initially come in a crew cab configuration with a medium-length bed, priced at $45,000 after federal rebate. With prototype and alpha builds concluded, Lordstown’s first beta Endurance vehicles are being built, and the company says it’s on track to start production in September.

We’ve not received an invitation to test drive an Endurance, nor to put one through its paces at Holly Oaks Off-Highway Vehicle Park near Detroit, but we’re standing by just in case.

[Images: Lordstown Motors]

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29 Comments on “100K+ Pre-Orders for Lordstown’s Pickup a Shocker...”


  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    No shock here, should have started with commercial vehicles instead of Leaf, Volt, Model S, etc. and these EVs could have done something ten years ago.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Additional: To any designers out there, deleting the grilles and leaving a big nose of composite looks really stupid – even more so on this big truck. Stop this please, you can come up with something decorative even if it serves no functional purpose.

      • 0 avatar
        dwford

        It’s a work truck. No one cares if it’s ugly. Have you seen all the delivery vans? Every manufacturer is making hideous vans right now. The grill-less front end could be a great spot for a business logo.

      • 0 avatar
        FerrariLaFerrariFace

        Putting a non-functional grille on it will incur the wrath of those who hate fake grilles on electric cars and/or fake air ducts. Damned if you do, damned if you don’t. Can’t make everybody happy, I guess.

        • 0 avatar
          Luke42

          “Putting a non-functional grille on it will incur the wrath of those who hate fake grilles on electric cars and/or fake air ducts.”

          I’m in this camp. Don’t put a big fake grill on my car just to match an obsolete aesthetic.

          It’s a good thing they make different kinds of cars for people with different tastes!

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “Don’t put a big fake grill on my car just to match an obsolete aesthetic.”

            Very well, continue to look cheap and cartoonish in your very expensive car.

            Agreed on your second point, sir.

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      Hopefully Lordstown Motors is using Bethlehem Steel…

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        Heh. You mean Cleveland-Cliffs. Bethlehem went out of business years ago, most of its assets sold to a German steel company that just sold the former Bethlehem steelmaking assets to C-C.

        If Lordstown is getting its steel from them, it’s at least in the same state, but there are several other steelmaking firms nearby, in eastern Ohio and western PA. That’s why GM built Lordstown assembly in the first place.

      • 0 avatar
        ToolGuy

        “whooosh”

  • avatar
    aja8888

    Is there a working prototype of this truck yet? Or is it a cardboard mock up with a set of unapproved engineering drawings?

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      The Endurance has a few trucks with Ohio plates on them at different locations around the country for private viewing to potential customers.

    • 0 avatar
      Imagefont

      Cardboard, sticky tape, chewing gum, baling wire and photoshop. And hope and dreams.

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        This Endurance is road worthy with a Ohio license plate!

        https://news.yahoo.com/why-lordstown-motors-analyst-bullish-181138864.html

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        You don’t get fleet orders with that, you need a working fleet of test vehicles, lots of performance data, and a functional assembly line. Commercial fleet operators don’t commit to any purchases without ironclad guarantees, and having GM as both a financial backer and supplier of assembly expertise is probably the main attraction.

  • avatar
    DAC17

    Big difference between a pre-order and a purchase. Until we know what percent of these orders convert to actual sales, we don’t know much.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      True.

      The Model 3 had 115k pre-orders in the first hour *before* it was revealed, including mine. That will always be the standard for me. But after two years of waiting, I rethought things and got a refund.

      That vehicle eventually went on to 500k+ pre-orders, but a substantial fraction of them (25%?) did not convert into a purchase, for one reason or another. Even so, the Model 3’s sales have been quite impressive.

      However, it’s worth noting that a $1000 pre-order for a Model 3 in 2016 shows much more commitment than a $100 pre-order for an Endurance in 2020, even if both were/are refundable.

      Today, buying a production Tesla requires a non-refundable down payment.

      On the other hand, nobody else has a production pickup EV, so Lordstown has the advantage of being first – maybe.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        It will be interesting to see who actually gets to market first since there are a number of EV pickups on the way and the world today isn’t always conducive to keeping to the desired schedules. It may come down to luck of the draw and being the one that doesn’t have supplier issues.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      Agree that putting down $100 to “save-the-date” vs actually paying the asking price for a totally new vehicle is a big leap. I know people who gave up their place in line for a C8 just because of delays. People love signing up for things via a few clicks, then reality sets in and they back out for various reasons.

  • avatar
    TimK

    I think the styling is conservative and handsome.

    Now the real issue — before production starts they need to bring in a Shaman to exorcise the curse of the Chevy Vega, a pall that looms over this factory. If they skip that important step all is lost!

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      The shaman will then go to work installing a cutting-edge technology water-powered noise generator in each vehicle, for pedestrian and children’s safety.

      The Lordstown truck with this device will turn water into whine.

  • avatar
    rpol35

    “Lordstown has a long history as the place where Chevrolet and Pontiac vehicles came together. The Vega, Monza, Cavalier, Cobalt, Cruze, and Pontiacs like the Sunbird and Sunfire were made in the General Motors plant in Lordstown, Ohio”.

    Just as an aside, I have a ’68 Impala convertible that was built at Lordstown, the third week of November 1967 (11C). Lordstown vehicles were designated by the letter “U” in their VIN.

    • 0 avatar
      indi500fan

      I remember touring there in the late 60s. The glory years of GMAD…GM Assembly Division.
      They built the B-body (Impala) full frame and F-body (Firebird) unibody with front subframe interchangeably on the same line.
      A pretty unique manufacturing line.

  • avatar
    RHD

    Lordstown Motors has a unique financing plan. Instead of making a fixed monthly payment for six or seven years, you just pay ten percent of your weekly income every Sunday (or Saturday if you’re Jewish).

  • avatar
    Imagefont

    Burns is a scammer, a liar and an expert excuse maker, all the while lining his pockets. They’re not going to start building this joke of a truck in September. Not this or any September. This things looks like a Frankenstein’d mishmash of older generation Tundra and Ford parts with zero imagination added. And the worlds worst pin stripe job. Egads!

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