Drive Notes: 2024 Chevrolet Trailblazer AWD RS

Tim Healey
by Tim Healey

Today we have another bit of basic transport from Chevy, though this one is a step up in terms of price and size from the Trax I recently reviewed.

I dug the Trax's combination of utility, sport, and affordable price. Would I feel the same about the 2024 Chevrolet Trailblazer AWD RS?


Not quite.

That's not to say the Trailblazer is bad. I wouldn't kick it out of the garage. But it never charmed me the way the Trax did.


Pros

  • The handling is sporty-ish. Engaging relative to vehicle type, though not really all that fun. You can generate a few grins on an on-ramp, but not much beyond that.
  • Low-end grunt is fine.
  • The infotainment system is easy to learn.
  • The gauges are simple and easy to use, as are the HVAC controls.
  • I like the customization ability for the gauges, and except for one thing (see below), it's easy to do.
  • I like how Chevy sweeps the center screen into the dash.

Cons

  • The ride is a tad too stiff.
  • The 1.3-liter turbo engine is quiet at low RPMs but loud and thrashy when you summon the beans.
  • Low-end grunt may be fine, but there's not much verve beyond that.
  • While some interior materials are nice, there's too much hard plastic.
  • Rear headroom is a bit chopped for those over six-foot-one, though legroom is fine.
  • I somehow changed the main gauge graphic and couldn't change it back. That sort of thing shouldn't be puzzling.
  • The price is...well I don't think it's too expensive, given where the market is. But the as-tested price of $34K (or less) can get you a better vehicle -- including Chevy's own Trax, if you can live with something smaller. To be fair, this one was option laden, and the base price was a more reasonable $28,700.

That's it for this edition.

[Images © 2024 Tim Healey/TTAC.com]

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Tim Healey
Tim Healey

Tim Healey grew up around the auto-parts business and has always had a love for cars — his parents joke his first word was “‘Vette”. Despite this, he wanted to pursue a career in sports writing but he ended up falling semi-accidentally into the automotive-journalism industry, first at Consumer Guide Automotive and later at Web2Carz.com. He also worked as an industry analyst at Mintel Group and freelanced for About.com, CarFax, Vehix.com, High Gear Media, Torque News, FutureCar.com, Cars.com, among others, and of course Vertical Scope sites such as AutoGuide.com, Off-Road.com, and HybridCars.com. He’s an urbanite and as such, doesn’t need a daily driver, but if he had one, it would be compact, sporty, and have a manual transmission.

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  • Ajla There's a melancholy to me about an EV with external speaker-generated "engine" noise and fake transmissions. It feels like an admission from the manufacturer that you're giving something up and they are trying to give back some facsimile of it. Like giving a cupcake scented candle to someone on a diet. If I was shopping for an EV I'd rather go to a company enthusiastic about it rather than apologetic.
  • EBFlex More proof of how much EVs suck. If you have to do this, that means you are trying to substitute what people want...and that's ICE.
  • Akear The only CEO who can save Boeing, GM, and Ford is Alan Mulally. Mulally is largely credited with saving both Boeing and Ford. The other alternative is to follow a failed Jack Welch business model. We have all witnessed what Jack Welch did to GE, and what happened to Boeing when it was taken over by GE-trained businessmen. Below is an interesting article on how Jack Welch indirectly ruined Boeing.https://www.thedailybeast.com/how-boeing-was-set-on-the-path-to-disaster-by-the-cult-of-jack-welch
  • ChristianWimmer The interior might be well-made, but the design is just hideous in my opinion. It’s to busy and there’s no simplistic harmony visible in it. In fact I feel that the nicest Lexus interior ever could be found in the original LS400 - because it was rather minimalistic, had pleasing lines and didn’t try to hard. It looked just right. All Lexus interiors which came after it just had bizarre styling cues and “tried to hard” if you know what I mean.
  • THX1136 As a couple of folks have mentioned wasn't this an issue with the DeLorean? I seem to recall that it was claimed you could do a 'minor' buff of the surface and it would be good as new. Guess I don't see why it's a big deal if it can be so easily rectified. Won't be any different than getting out and waxing the car every so often - part of ownership, eh.
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