By on October 25, 2019

Y’all excited about Bronco? Seems a few of you are, rushing rapturously to the computer every time a Blue Oval patent appears for an innovative removable top. The Bronco is indeed on the way, and with it a wide range of configurations and trims.

Joining it is a model born of a galaxy-brain moment at the Glass House: an Escape that’s not an Escape (but is). Yes, next year is shaping up to be a big one for the automaker, so let’s look at what we know about product timing and what words you’ll see emblazoned on fenders and liftgates/tailgates.

By now, pretty much all of you have read how the body-on-frame Bronco will sport two or four doors, with a roof that’s removable either in full or in pieces. It’s appearing late next year. A frame from Ford’s Q3 earnings report shows the model introduction pushed to the end of the year, perhaps beyond that. Without dates provided on the X axis, the product chart merely shows the sequence of introductions (or so one would assume).

ford

You’ll see that the next-generation F-150 comes ahead of the “Mustang-inspired” EV crossover that debuts publicly on November 17th, as well as the Bronco pair. A source with knowledge of Ford’s product plans claims the Bronco will make its appearance in November or December, going on sale in January of 2021. The “Baby Bronco” will show up first, however, and perhaps much sooner than in the chart’s timeline. Our source claims an on-sale date of September or October 2020 for the Bronco-inspired, Escape-based compact crossover.

When it appears, expect the Baby Bronco to carry the Bronco Sport name. While earlier reports, based on a trademark filing, suggested a Bronco Scout moniker, that trademark was abandoned in September. Two months before the abandonment, Ford applied for use of the Bronco Sport name.

Image: Ford

A Ford Authority piece from August called attention to the name swap, citing an internal source. Ours says the same. Ford, of course, has yet to confirm a name. Earlier this week, Motor1 published a photo of a completely naked Bronco Sport getting ready for production, so be sure to salivate over that. There’s no Bronco-inspired grille and fascia to be seen in the side-on shot, but the automaker makes it clear the little unibody will do its best to emulate its bigger, BOF brother. The bare-metal vehicle is twinsies with one seen in a photo taken at a dealer meeting earlier this year (see above).

Other recent trademark filings shows Ford plans to use, or is at least considering using, the Bronco Big Bend and Bronco Outer Banks names for its big boy. No specific Bronco Sport variants, sorry. A series of applications we’ve already reported on could be affixed to any vehicle from Ford’s truck division. Among them, Wildtrak, Badlands, Adrenaline, and Black Diamond. If these sound like they could find a home in the Ranger stable, you’re probably right.

While our source claims Ford has a heritage-tinged “Sixty Six” base trim in store for the Bronco, commemorating the model’s debut model year, this moniker hasn’t yet appeared in any trademark application.

Image: Ford

[Images: Ford]

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56 Comments on “Ford Bronco and Bronco Sport: Names and Dates...”


  • avatar
    EBFlex

    Yawn.

    At this point, by the time it comes out, it will feel many years old.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    I have a feeling this is going to be a nothing burger with 4 wheel independent suspension, it will be hard to lift and the only engine options will be a 4 cylinder hybrid or just as bad a 6 cylinder turbo.

    The longer they tease a product correlates with how much of a let down it will be.

    I could be wrong, this could have two solid axles and a V8, it will be the second coming if so, so Im not holding my breath at something that good.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      It might have solid axles, but I think the V8 is a non-starter. We already know the 2.3T I4 will be one of the engines.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        On a percent of sales basis Ford has sold significantly more Broncos with V8s than they have Mustangs with V8s. It would be careless and excessively wreck less not to offer this with at least the 5.0. If there’s one Ford I think of when I think V8, it’s the Bronco and its 351.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          Hell even the compact 1st gen Bronco has V8s, if Ford has such poor mismanagement as to not offer the most obviously desirable powertrain than they are truly unworthy of survival as a company.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            The first Bronco was only available with a feeble Falcon-derived I6 for the first seven or eight months of production. A new Bronco with a naturally aspirated I6 would be the stuff of dreams today.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      There is zero chance the Bronco will offer a V8. Totally and completely zero.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Agreed.

        I think the only engine at first is going to be the 2.3T, just like in the Ranger. Maybe later there will be a 2.7T variant.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          You guys honestly think Ford is going to introduce the Bronco with powertrains inferior to the Wranglers right up front? First impressions are everything and if this arrives on dealer lots with tiny turbo engines it’s going to be laughed out of any of the good credit Ford has been building up to its release. This is an important release and after the Explorer Ford cannot afford to screw this up.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            It isn’t going to have any V8, my man. It is best to lower your expectations now because the 2.3T is what you’re getting.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            It’s not what I’m getting, unless it costs under $20k I’m not going to be caught dead in a 4 cylinder vehicle. I didn’t work my arse off to get where I’m at to be stuck in a chintzy 4 cylinder turbo anything.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            I think you’d be immensely happier with a Power Wagon or Tremor.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            I’d be happy with a real American SUV that’s not Barbie dolled up, but apparently that’s too much to ask.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            The Ford 2.3T doesn’t sound as good as the Wrangler’s Pentastar, but it makes more power and torque. If there is a 2.7T version it will blow the doors off anything in the Wrangler.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Ford really doesn’t seem to know what its doing anymore.

      • 0 avatar
        dividebytube

        I could do Ford’s 3.7L engine in the Bronco – one that should have been used for more cars instead of the NA 3.5L. But they’re letting the 3.7 wither on the vine… turbo 4-cyls are here to stay and, given the EPA requirements, it is no surprise.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Its a foolish move, they’re going to put all the money on this but they won’t give the customer a varied motor choice? Let’s double down on the dumb here, why even offer a motor at all why not just make it a BEV from the get go? That’s what everyone wants, or so I’ve read.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            If this fails they will say consumers don’t want these vehicles, when very well speaking this is the exact vehicle you want with a V8 and manual trans, convertibles are fun vehicles and should have fun drivetrains.

            As cheap as it is to throw in engines already in the portfolio this should come to market with 4+ engine options.

            *Speaking as someone with a 345 V8 4 speed manual convertible SUV.

  • avatar
    thalter

    Yes, this feel like the endless pre-launch of the fifth-generation Camaro.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    I am excited about this.

    But I have to say the botch job going on with the Explorer is not exactly keeping the flame lit.

    I generally like Ford products, and I don’t require Toyota-like reliability, but I won’t except trash which is what sounds like is coming out of Chicago these days.

    They have 1 shot with this Bronco.

    But yes they’re dragging it on for so so so too long. Which is a little odd when the GT they did right. Showed it. On sale shortly after.

    • 0 avatar
      jfb43

      I hope that this extended, agonizing release means they’re making sure it’s done “right”. I also hope that their definition of “right” aligns with mine.

  • avatar
    dwford

    A new Ranger seems to be missing off that chart…

  • avatar
    JMII

    Has Ford changed its name to F-150 & SUV Store yet?

  • avatar
    RHD

    Territory? Corsair? Ford Aviator?
    Are those names really going to show up at a Ford dealer, or is this chart just from somewhere else (Australia, maybe?)?

  • avatar
    Mackey

    I’m still not sure why they feel the need to dilute the Bronco name by adding it to a lesser vehicle sold alongside the actual Bronco. I should say, I know why, I’m just disappointed.

    They know that the REAL Broncos will be a halo vehicle for most- pure image- so for the Instagram hipsters who can’t get the credit to buy a Bronco on an 84 month term (or lease it), they can still feel good about themselves by telling their friend they have a ‘BRONCO (sport)’, conveniently leaving off the Sport part in most conversations.

    What if Chevy offered a Cruze 2 door as a Corvette Sport, or Jeep chose to sell the Renegade as a Wrangler Sport?

    I wish they had just called the small SUV the Maveric (or however they spelled it) and been done with it. Sporty Ford family name, toughish, while not diluting the Bronco name.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      Who told you that you get to define what the Bronco “is” and what would “dilute” it? What is a “real Bronco?” Is it the off-roady thing it started out as, or the really short F-150 it ended as? And it’s not like it’s unprecedented, remember the Bronco II?

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Bronco II despite its shortcomings was at least BOF, correct wheel drive, and had a real transfer case going to at least one articulating solid axle. That’s not even a fair comparison to compare a unibody cute ute to the Bronco II.

        Mackeys correct, the only reason to associate the unibody “Bronco” with the real off-road BoF version, and similarly the EV crossover that keeps having the name Mustang used over and over to describe it; is all to AstroTurf interest in products that cannot stand on their own merit.

        There’s no practical purpose for a unibody Car based vehicle to be marketed as off-road capable when it certainly is not. But Ford sees Jeep selling one off-road vehicle surrounded by a bunch of cute utes that only sell due to the Wrangler and wants in on that.

        It’s a new automotive world, where automakers are seemingly incapable of building anything ground up that actually interest people any longer so they resort to dropping names and name plates on inferior products, praying that they can fool some of the people some of the time.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          “It’s a new automotive world, where automakers are seemingly incapable of building anything ground up that actually interest people any longer”

          Or you and your generation are aging and decreasing in relevancy with respect to marketing and purchasing power prompting the manufacturers to care less and less about your opinions on these things.

          While I would agree with your assessment that this product is not likely to be a “real” hardcore offroader, everything doesn’t need to be. The Renegade wears Jeep badges and there is no reason this vehicle couldn’t work at that level.

          With respect to your earlier rant on engine choices yes as has been pointed out should Ford drop the 2.7 into the Bronco it will be Jeep with the Wrangler that will need to step up to the plate with something power-train wise. I’d imagine they are ready to plug in the Hemi or at least offer some flavor of forced induction on the current motor in line with some of the aftermarket supercharger kits.

          I doubt the forced induction vs. NA carries as much weight as you seem to assign as Ford has already blazed the trail and gain mainstream acceptance in the F150. If it fails it will be because they messed up elsewhere…those engines are fine. Even an IFS would work if it was something akin to the old TTB that has some flex in it.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            “Or you and your generation are aging and decreasing in relevancy with respect to marketing and purchasing power prompting the manufacturers to care less and less about your opinions on these things.”

            Last night I went for a walk on Atlantic Avenue and saw a bunch of young POC car clubs cruising the strip. I don’t know where their purchasing power comes from, but they are spending it on new senior AMG Mercedes-Benz cars and big Mopar SRT stuff with hood scoops. Product planning decisions are not being made based on who has money and how they’re spending it, and this fantasy land the fascists live in will ruin everything.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            FCA isn’t going to make a V8 Wrangler. If Ford does offer any EB V6 (and that’s an *if*) in a Bronco variant then it’ll be behind a tall enough paywall that Jeep won’t lose much sleep over it. The 2.3T is going to be the volume engine.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “Or you and your generation are aging and decreasing in relevancy with respect to marketing and purchasing power prompting the manufacturers to care less and less about your opinions on these things.”

            yep. the damn Boomers desperately want it to be 1965 forever.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            “ Or you and your generation are aging and decreasing in relevancy with respect to marketing and purchasing power prompting the manufacturers to care less and less about your opinions on these things.”

            At 39 I may be no spring chicken but I plan to have buying potential for at least another 50 years if not more. If manufacturers are going to cater to an age demographic that has money and isn’t close to retirement age then I am the model consumer.

            As an aside my son has already claimed my H1 wagon as his first vehicle, and I know my nephew is into big, fast, and loud. I wouldn’t discount traditional American vehicles and drivetrains with the up and coming generation.

            Yes if your going to market an off-road vehicle it better be able to off-road, the Renegade nor any of its cohort have a track record better than a Subaru or a 38 Buick off-road.

            A non hardcore off-roader was a Suburban once upon a time, now that same suburban looks like a hardcore off-roader. Manufacturers are trying to change the definition of off-roader but the hardware cannot match the talk. Off-road challenges do not get less grueling due to a loss of capability in vehicle choices.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            The Millennials are now the biggest generation, effectively displacing the Baby Boomers. Business should be focusing on them, marketing to them and advertising for their needs.

            But the big money is still with the Baby Boomers and some of their descendants, as in generational wealth passed downward.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            “ yep. the damn Boomers desperately want it to be 1965 forever.”

            I feel like I’m in 1965 with the abundance of tiny cars puttering around with wheezy 4 cylinders pumping out soot from the direct injection engines.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            “The Millennials are now the biggest generation, effectively displacing the Baby Boomers. Business should be focusing on them, marketing to them and advertising for their needs.

            But the big money is still with the Baby Boomers and some of their descendants, as in generational wealth passed downward.”

            You do realize that there is in fact this whole generation in between those two that is in fact doing quite well and unlike the Boomers, isn’t purchasing what is likely to be their last ride, right? The fact They never got around to actually giving Gen-X a name doesn’t mean they don’t exist…Though the Boomers and Millennials are so freaking self absorbed (and similar) I suppose its not surprising they miss that fact.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            I can’t see Ford putting a V8 into the Bronco. All one has to do is look at the Brazilian Troller. It started out as a solid axle beast with a diesel engine and now has basically the same drive-trains and frame as the global Ranger.

            The “it will only sell if it has a V8” crowd needs to look at the F150. The 5.0 V8 is probably the least favoured engine. When I check out year end clear out sales, the 5.0 V8 is basically what’s left.

            The ongoing debate between solid axles and IFS rage on in the off-road world. There are pros and cons to both. One has to wait and see what Ford does. I’m going on the premise that the Bronco will share drive-trains with the Ranger.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            “Though the Boomers and Millennials are so freaking self absorbed (and similar) I suppose its not surprising they miss that fact.”

            I don’t think that is it. Marketers and advertisers always focus on demographics that have money and spend it.

            Gen-X as a demographic doesn’t spend because it has very little money and won’t come into focus until AFTER the Boomers have been relegated to the grave yard and the Millennials have displaced them as top spenders.

            Eventually, through attrition, Gen-X will become the prime target for marketing and advertising.

            Until then, Gen-X will have little voice and little say even if they have money.

            There’s just too few of them to offset the Boomers and Millennials.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            @HDC, As I said, Gen X is doing just fine. It is likely to be the last generation for some time to be better off than their parents were.

            https://www.cnbc.com/2019/01/11/millennials-households-earn-more-money-than-ever-heres-the-problem.html

            “Eventually, through attrition, Gen-X will become the prime target for marketing and advertising.”

            Eventually? So are we going to pretend the 1990’s didn’t happen either?

            Look, I get it, compared to the Boomers and the Millennials, Gen-X is small numbers wise. There is however a reason that retro is so hot right now…It is because the generation actually has disposable income and really set the culture for the so called “last great decade (the 1990’s). Heck I just saw they are bringing back a full sized clone of the Commodore 64. Now who do you suppose that bit of frivolity is directed at?

            Honestly, I don’t care, I just find this little p!$$!ng match between the boomers and millienals funny…they are both the same…self absorbed and think their politics are life and death. As to marketing, Boomers are old and I keep hearing Millienals are broke and drowning in College debt. I think my generation is the sweet spot. The 80’s and 90’s??? People miss em’. Who is going to say in 20 years “You know, the 2010’s were amazing”. They will be relegated to something akin to the malaise era.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            “I feel like I’m in 1965 with the abundance of tiny cars puttering around with wheezy 4 cylinders pumping out soot from the direct injection engines.”

            Yeah, if it were 1965 you could grab you a car that was pushing 400 cubic inches, had single digit MPG’s, and would crumple like a coke can if it hit something that could almost keep up with my little “weezy” 4 cylinder…at least until the road curved slightly.

            If you can get past some of the styling (though peak car in my book style wise was the 90’s, not the 60’s), then we really live in a golden era by all measurable objective statistics.

            But I know, something something “muh Vee 8 sound”. Time marches on and even as a guy perpetually stuck in the mid 90’s, if I am brutally honest the only thing that hasn’t improved over the years are computer keyboards. They peaked circa 1982.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            “ Yeah, if it were 1965 you could grab you a car that was pushing 400 cubic inches, had single digit MPG’s, and would crumple like a coke can if it hit something that could almost keep up with my little “weezy” 4 cylinder…at least until the road curved slightly.”

            Yea no, the car you described sounds infinitely more appealing than the weezy 4 cylinder ricer. I’ll take mine in Imperial flavor, a battering Ram with extremely thick metal and a nice slow turning smooth V8.

            You won’t catch me in the 4 cylinder I would be embarrassed if someone heard that shtick, so yes please go around your curve with your heavy wheel camber and pointless “wing” so no one suspects that horrid sound is coming from anything I’m piloting.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Art, were you aware that those same Millennials we’re talking about will inherit $68TRILLION from the Baby Boomers.

            You know that’s Big Bucks, and what will happen is there will be an even greater schism between the “haves” and “have-nots” in America.

            I don’t know if the same will hold true for nations other than America.

            Generational wealth will always be around for some, and the key to success is to manage it prudently.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “Time marches on”

            Modern V8s exist and they are very good, but fuel economy regulations in Europe, Asia, and NA are also quite strict (and getting stricter). There’s no reason to blow up compliance for an off-road SUV.

            FWIW though, the turbo-4 and turbo-6 doesn’t have much of a future either.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            ajla, I am saddened at the upcoming demise of the V8 engine. Starting with the original Ford Flathead, any V8 was the best of all worlds, in its day.

            But I rejoice in the fact that during MY lifetime I will still be able to buy a grunty, gnarly V8 for the vehicles I want to own.

            All my wife and I have to do is decide when to settle down and restrict our travels to drive-able distances.

            But right now, we like to travel to places outside of the US far too much.

            Can’t have new vehicles just sitting around, depreciating, without getting used.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Sure @hummer. You may have noticed my impassiond defense of Gen-X. This would imply that as a member I am in my 40’s at a minimum. As such do you really think I drive such a vehicle as you describe. I mean if that’s how you see a bone stock (minus the wheels that I actually went SMALLER on…but they are Contour SVT stock 16 inchers so…) then whatever your mind is made up.

            The King Dingaling car of my High School years was the Fox Body 5.0 Mustang (Until the 4th Gen Camaro hit but it wasnt really attainable). I love those cars and Owned one. The Fiesta is it’s Performance equal or better pretty much everywhere. The 60’s iron I owned wasn’t on the same planet (with the exception of how good it looked).

            But honestly if The Fiesta isn’t your flavor I could leave it at home and outperform 90 percent of the stuff you wax on nostalgically about in my son’s Leaf.

            I like V8’s too but good lord man, you sound like a charicature of an old “get off my lawn” guy…and you are younger than me.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            “Art, were you aware that those same Millennials we’re talking about will inherit $68TRILLION from the Baby Boomers.”

            You know, many boomers have children who are members of the aforementioned Gen-X. I suppose since the Boomers emcompass so many years there are younger ones that had kids later, but the earlier part of the generation had kids in the early to mid 1970’s.

            Having said that, I’m not planning on inheriting much and will likely have to shell out some cash to care fore my parents in the coming years. This is a reality many with aging parents will face…not a windfall. The boomers regardless of who their children are, were terrible at saving. Frankly, so am I…I just got to a point where I make enough to sock some away regardless of how silly I can be sometimes with cash.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Art Vandelay, I understand.

            I didn’t inherit doodly squat from my mom and dad because they had nothing accumulated, plowing everything they had acquired along the way back into the core family as they went along.

            OTOH, my wife and her sisters are the beneficiaries of their parents, who were brought to the US from Germany against their wishes after WWII, who willingly became US citizens in 1950, and then successfully worked until retirement and then bought an existing real-estate business to build and expand.

            But they did go back to Germany in 2015 to die, leaving their accumulated wealth to their 4 daughters in America.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      I would argue that the simple existance of the Renegade as a Jeep undermines this arguement.

      I think Ford is looking to position the Bronco nameplate with the Jeep badge itself…not the Wrangler model. I could see the Raptor moving under such an umbrella at some point if successful similar to the Rubicon trim level.

      Ford see’s Jeep vehicles like the Renegade getting getting a premium price wise though it is a Fiat 500L underneath. Ford wants in on that action. But they aren’t about to set up another brand.

      It works for Jeep because of the years of reputation they built selling real offroad rigs. It could work for Ford because the Bronco occupies a similar niche in people’s minds and the fact that is has been gone for some time actually helps it here (people tend to remember the old school rigs vs. the OJ rigs).

      But Ford has to nail the “real” Bronco for this to work. I’m encouraged by the talk of 2 doors and removable tops, but it is going to have to have a real suspension and offroad chops. Time will tell here.

  • avatar
    TakeshiHonda

    Toyota should revive the FJ Cruiser

  • avatar
    SuperCarEnthusiast

    These to upcoming models – Bronco Sport and the Bronco are taking forever to be released! I think new redesign of th Jeep Grand Cherokee will beat it to release! Ford is screwing itself with these delays!

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      All Ford has to do is build a Bronco as capable as the Wrangler but more reliable and they should do well. I know plenty of Jeep guys who live with shoddy Jeep durability because there isn’t anything as capable off-road on the market.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        “ All Ford has to do is build a Bronco as capable as the Wrangler but more reliable and they should do well.”

        If my experience is any indication of reliability in a Ford you are sure asking a lot of Ford.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @Hummer – Ford doesn’t know how to build a durable car but they do a good job with trucks. Statistics do point out that they beat FCA with durability/reliability year after year in that arena.

  • avatar
    SuperCarEnthusiast

    Rumor starting price have been rumor about. The Bronco will be in the $40K base price while the smaller Bronco will start at $30K!


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