By on August 8, 2019

2019 Honda Accord Sport front quarter

Two Honda plants in Indiana and Ohio bear the brunt of a decision made last spring to tap the brakes on Civic and Accord production. At the start of the month, Honda of America suspended the second shift on one of two lines at Ohio’s Marysville Assembly Plant, the result of flagging sales that show no signs of reversal.

While Honda categorizes the move as temporary, the second shift’s return will have to wait “a few years.”

Details of the shift cut come from Honda spokesman Chris Abbruzzese. In a message to Motor1, he claimed the shift cut will not impact production of the Acura TLX and ILX, which also call Marysville home.

“While the one line that was affected by the temporary shift reduction did manufacture Accord, CR-V, ILX and TLX, the production adjustment will primarily affect Accord and Civic, built at the Marysville Auto Plant and Honda Manufacturing of Indiana (HMIN), respectively,” he wrote. “This impacts HMIN because both MAP [Marysville] and HMIN build CR-V, so we have the flexibility to shift some production of CR-V to HMIN. This does not impact Acura production at this time.”

Two shifts will continue on Marysville’s Line 2, Abbruzzese said, adding that the decision is all “about maintaining Honda’s sales discipline and smart management of our business by aligning supply with current market demand.” The automaker plans to maintain “a robust sedan business,” he said.

Civic production also takes place at a plant in Ontario, Canada. While Honda’s assertion that the second Line 1 shift at Marysville will return could be viewed with suspicion, the automaker has promised to move production of Civics currently built in the UK and Turkey to North American plants in 2021. That has everything to do with streamlining and achieving a 100 percent plant utilization rate.

In February, Honda CEO Takahiro Hachigo said the move would mean North Americans will source all of their Civics from within the region.

In the U.S., Accord sales fell 5.9 percent through July, mirroring declines seen by other players in the segment. The model’s post-recession high water mark came in 2014. The Civic, on the other hand, had a boffo month of July, with sales rising 10.9 percent, year over year. This summertime performance wasn’t enough to budge its year-to-date tally into the black, however — Civic sales are down 2.1 percent through the end of last month. The best sales year in the model’s U.S. history was 2017.

[Images: Chris Tonn/TTAC, Honda]

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91 Comments on “Fewer Honda Sedans Emerging From Midwest After Production Cut...”


  • avatar
    AA610

    That’s a bummer as the current gen Accord is a fantastic car, especially for the money.

    • 0 avatar
      thornmark

      Spot on.

      As I recall, Bark’s brother did a review in R&T and said the Accord was as good or better than the $60k German sedans he had recently driven and that the Accord was the best family sedan sold in the US.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Maybe they’re just cutting production because of forecasts for fewer future car sales in the US.

      And then there’s the trend toward SUVs, CUVs and MPVs.

      I think they (Honda) don’t want to overproduce sedans.

      Lots of Honda and Toyota left overs on car lots right now, including sedans, but the best deals are left over Nissans, if a buyer is so inclined. Fantastic deals, just to move all that iron.

    • 0 avatar
      Daniel J

      After test driving a sport 2.0T, I didn’t find it that fantastic. The Touring is the only model I would have purchased if it wasn’t for my knee jamming into the dashboard. The touring is 2-3K overpriced though, IMHO.

  • avatar
    quaquaqua

    Eventually sedans will be fashionable again (from people not wanting to look like a soccer mom, which will absolutely be the reputation of all CUVs) or just more cost-effective if gas gets more expensive. When that happens, automakers like Honda, Toyota, VW, Hyundai are gonna be ready for the switch back to sedans. GM/Ford/Chrysler won’t be.

    • 0 avatar
      Oldschool

      Right? The D3 always think short term and just rather eliminate slow selling vehicles instead of simply scaling back production. Plus with their lack of strong marketing, you wonder how is anyone supposed to know about your products if you never advertise the damn things!

      They rest on their laurels too much as well. Toyota, Honda, and now H/K heavily invest on constantly keeping their sedans fresh and updated either with new tech or in design. While GM and Ford take years or are always too slow to update them in which customers take notice and always will usually choose the latest and greatest model.

      Toyota and Honda are still good cars, but they are nowhere as well built or had the same quality like they did back in the 90’s or at least up until 97 for Honda. The interior plastics and certain trim in many areas of their vehicles are no better than other brands.

      What they do have going for them is their tech and stylish interiors, but not necessarily the tightly fitted “softly padded panels everywhere” like a 1994 or 98 Toyota Camry had.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      So how far down the road will this be? I mean they shifted away from wagons like 40 years ago and they haven’t come back.

      If sedans come back, how difficult would it be for the big 3 to craft a sedan off an existing platform. Bear in mind the Explorer’s platform was built to underpin the next gen Mustang as well as the stillborn Continental which, last time I checked, was a sedan.

      It isn’t 1955 anymore. Product lines are way more intertwined and platforms shared.

      Lastly, if you are going toake that argument, would it be fair to say the Japanese totally missed the shift to full-sized trucks and large SUV’s as personal transportation and just kept milking their bread and butter cash cow CamCords? And that was the mid 90s? At what point is it no longer a fad?

      Wish all you want, but the 3 box sedan isn’t coming back. How long do you think Honda will keep cranking them out if demand continues to slide? Those sedans are like the full-sized Caddy’s, Crown Vic’s, Caprices, and Buicks of my youth. Driven by an aging population while the generation under them has no interest in them. Like the wagon, their day is passed outside of small niches…in the US at least.

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        We’ll be mostly into to EV’s for this size of sedan in the near term. With small SUVs taking over makes for the perfect scapegoat.

        • 0 avatar
          thornmark

          bs

          EV’s are not competitive and won’t be for years, better yet, decades

          reminds of the ethanol boondoggle, even the paid shills have given up on that one.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            @Thornmark, I am far from an EV Fanboi, but EV sales are growing. Traditional sedan sales are shrinking.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            “EV’s are not competitive and won’t be for years,”

            Probably true for one-car owners. But owners of multiple cars often include an EV in their “fleet”.

            I know one old geezer who owns a Volt, right next to his F150, his wife’s Avalon, and his Jeep Wrangler Sahara, with only TWO drivers in his household.

            LOL

          • 0 avatar
            NormSV650

            Honda/Acura is so far behind they had to find someone to invest in. So GM was the wise choice for AV and EV tech.

            “…Honda’s own self-driving development program isn’t close to anything like that. The company said last year that it likely won’t release its first Level 4 self-driving systemuntil 2025. (A “Level 4” system is one that is limited, typically to areas that have been carefully mapped. You can learn more about the “levels” of autonomous-vehicle technology here.) Motley Fool

          • 0 avatar
            thornmark

            EV sales, except at the very top end, flatline when government subsidies expire

            actually just read that Tesla sales flatlined in Hong Kong when the gov took the cash away – the graph went to zero

            I also suspect that Tesla will be like Mini – once the people that want one get one, the sales momentum will be gone, because they really aren’t very well made

          • 0 avatar
            gomez

            @thornmaek: That’s only partially true. Yes, Tesla Model S sales dropped to near-zero in Hong Kong when the incentive went away. But the Model S is a very expensive car in that market and the Registration Tax that was previously waived for EVs is based on the price of the vehicle. So the already expensive Model S saw the effective price jump by 150% after the waiver expired. Cheaper EVs such as the Kona and Leaf are still selling at levels similar to what Tesla was selling at before the incentive expired (not counting the spike that occurred the month bought before the incentive expired). So the Tesla sales drop was mostly due to the 150% price increase, not due to lack of demand for EVs.

          • 0 avatar
            gomez

            @thornmaek: That’s only partially true. Yes, Tesla Model S sales dropped to near-zero in Hong Kong when the incentive went away. But the Model S is a very expensive car in that market and the Registration Tax that was previously waived for EVs is based on the price of the vehicle. So the already expensive Model S saw the effective price jump by 150% after the waiver expired. Cheaper EVs such as the Kona and Leaf are still selling at levels similar to what Tesla was selling at before the incentive expired (not counting the spike that occurred the month bought before the incentive expired). So the Tesla sales drop was mostly due to the 150% price increase, not due to lack of demand for EVs.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Yes Thornmark, lets take a tiny market and extrapolate global trends from it. Meanwhile here in the US the Subsidys are almost gone yet sales keep growing. That would seem to indicate they are not the terrible cars that the Luddite Brigade on here would have us believe.

      • 0 avatar
        alexndr333

        I agree. It would be interesting to compare the hip-point of a 1949 Chevrolet with a new Equinox and Malibu. It’s my guess that the seat height of that post-war Chevy would be closer to the CUV than to the sedan. My point is that the CUV today is more like the cars of old, where you don’t have to climb down into them.

        In short, it’s not that the sedans have gone away, it’s that we have finally realized that “longer, lower, wider” is impractical and inconvenient when higher-riding options are available. If GM crafted a new 3-box DeVille, Electra and Caprice on the chassis of the Enclave / Traverse, I believe they’d sell pretty well. It would settle the question of whether it’s just seat height after all that makes CUV’s so popular today.

      • 0 avatar

        Exactly my thoughts. When last time you saw syfy movie where actors drive sedans? Normally it is some kind of autonomous blob with panoramic windows and roof which can also fly if necessary. No, sedans are not coming back. And no, Government will not allow you to drive the car – it is too dangerous.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      I keep waiting for CUVs to be seen as staid mom-mobiles the way wagons and then minivans were. It hasn’t happened yet. But I’m worried that when it does we are going to see women migrate to pickups the same way men already have, not back to cars.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        If your choice is a equinox or a Civic – is it really hard to see why sedans are dying? Yes they both suck as forms of transportation for anyone with a tinge of auto passion, but the modern sedans are frumpy, and neither sedans nor crossovers tend to offer compelling drivetrains so the easy answer is to just jump into the mommy mobile equinox and blend into the background.
        In general sedans don’t look good anymore no matter how many LEDs they put into them. My point being, yes crossovers scream mommy that’s afraid of the minivan stigma, but most sedans just scream cheap and uninspiring. How do you win?

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          If I had to buy an inexpensive sedan tomorrow, it would be a Civic Si. I don’t find it “uninspiring” at all. That Nox, on the other hand…

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Personally, I’d skip the Si in favor of an Elantra Sport – the Honda’s a better performer, but the difference is marginal, and the Elantra is a silly good deal. Get one with a manual while you can.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I start out with a 30-year-old bias in favor of Honda, but I would test drive the Elantra and give it a chance.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      Unlikely. There are more forces at work than just the whim of fashion. The deck is stacked against vehicles that are EPA classified as “cars” when to comes to regulatory compliance costs.

  • avatar
    cprescott

    Considering how bloated these Honduhs have become, the current Civic should have been the Accord and the current Accord should have been renamed to something that does not distort the nameplate. The Honduh Fit should have been something smaller and the Civic should be Fit sized which would match the brand’s product positioning until all the lard has been added to these two hideous things.

    Honduh and Toyoduh were all telling us they were immune from sedan flee syndrome but that was a lie.

    There is good news, when today’s brats grow up and want to buy a vehicle using their parents’ money, they’ll want sedans so that they won’t ride in their parents’ wheels.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      “Honduh,” “Toyoduh,” and “Mazduh” need to land comments in moderation purgatory the same way cuss words do now.

    • 0 avatar
      thornmark

      The current Accord is shorter than the previous generation. And that previous generation was shorter than the generation previous to that.

      What has grown is interior room, where the Accord is classified as a “large” car in some permutations.

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        Yes.

        And the trunk is HUGE, if oddly accessible, because of the slope of the rear window.

        My main complaint is that when they decided to enable the rear seats to flop and fold in both the Hybrid and ICE versions, Honda moved the batteries around such that they needed to reduce the capacity of the gas tank, but kept that same tank size on the ICE cars! Instead of 475 indicated miles on the range and after a fillup, I’m lucky to see 375 in my new Accord!

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        Buick Regql Sportback is about one inch smaller on the inside dimensions but the truck size is double the Accord.

        The Regal Sportback discounted price u der $20K is quite the deal for 2.0T sedan.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I’m a little behind on the latest and greatest from HMC, but wasn’t there some kind of severe issue with the turbo I4s going on this and the CRV/Civic? Was that ever resolved?

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Fuel leaking into the oil in 1.5T engines in CR-Vs and Civics. The Accord, which has a different 1.5T engine, seems unaffected. The problem seems uncommon but not uncommon enough to be a fluke. Honda’s done two reflashes, is offering an extended warranty on some engine components, and may be quietly implementing a hardware fix.

      • 0 avatar
        crispin001

        My little sister’s 2018 Accord seems to have the oil dilution issue. Grrrr….it’s her first new car and I feel bad for her.

        I’m not a Japanese car person but I’ve driven it and I like it a lot. Hopefully it will hold up.

        • 0 avatar
          sgeffe

          Is it the 1.5T or 2.0T?

          I thought my 2.0T might have been exhibiting the problem, just from the smell, as the oil level hasn’t moved. But someone had spilled a little gas at my local GREEDWay last week, and when I checked the oil again, I realized that the oil didn’t have quite the same smell at all to it. I’m going to send a sample to Blackstone Labs for an analysis at my first change, and that should tell the tale. (Even the service folks at my dealer have eased some people’s fears, and from what I recall, one of those owners had an oil analysis done, with no unusual findings. Not that it isn’t an issue, but if necessary, $35 is a reasonable price to get peace of mind on this issue—$25 for a test without some of the advanced stuff.)

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Is Honda doing anything for her?

    • 0 avatar
      psychoboy

      I’m not sure about the “severity” of the problem, but it seems like cold weather causes an incomplete burn of direct injected fuel at startup, which ends up in the oil. The reflash likely reduces the amount of fuel used in the start cycle.

      I’m in Oklahoma, I don’t think any of the cars my favorite dealer services has experienced the problem.

  • avatar
    readallover

    Maybe somebody should tell some of Honda`s dealers that the 1980`s are over and people no longer feel the need to give their first born to get in line to pay additional dealer markup for an Accord.

  • avatar
    johnnyz

    Honda dealers have forever not negotiated on the price of the Accord. It’s nice to see reality set in as Hondas lose their luster has unobtainium.

    Go Nissan!

  • avatar
    thornmark

    Nissan is a bad joke.

    The Altima junk drove much better cars from the market, like the Fusion. It’s really too bad Renault bailed Nissan out.

  • avatar
    JoeBrick

    This is NOT the result of a shift from sedans to any other type of car. It is NOT because Hondas are not fine cars. They are. It is because of the RECESSION that we are already in but the mainstream news outlets AND the government are trying not to let you know about it. We are in the beginnings of it and IT WILL BE A DOOZEY ! It will make the 2008 recession- which we really never came completely out of- look pretty mild. I hate to say it also, as I am a Trump supporter, but if this recession is too rough, his re-election chances are going to be hurt.
    The 2008 recession was caused by too much debt. So what did we (not me personally) do ? We doubled the debt. And more. Hold on to your hats !

    • 0 avatar

      Tell all that to stock market. It does not follow your directives.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      A recession is not some abstract thing…it is, if I remember correctly, defined as 2 consecutive quarters of negative growth. Last quarter the economy was still growing.

      • 0 avatar
        deanst

        That is not the actual definition, but it is a good approximation. (The NBER – which dates U.S. recessions – looks at a variety of economic stats related to changes in economic activity.)

      • 0 avatar
        JoeBrick

        Last YEAR- the whole year, had a fantastic 5% growth for the GDP. Except for one little thing. The government debt grew at a 6% rate, meaning that our growth for the whole year of 2018 wasn’t 5% but MINUS1%. I call that a (hidden) recession. And U.S. spending is increasing for the next 2 years according to the recently worked-out budget deal. And the debt ceiling has been circumvented too. But then again, I could be wrong, I admit. I am not an economist, I am just a dumb guy who watches 20 or 30 financial websites every day. Like I said, I COULD BE WRONG, so don’t give me any money to invest for you. LOL But I am telling my friends to be careful with their money for awhile.Keep some for a rainy day. Or a couple of rainy years. You heard it from the dumb guy first.

    • 0 avatar
      Superdessucke

      Uh huh. I think you should keep to the family separation talking point.

  • avatar
    volvo

    Turbo 4s and CVT as the mainstream powertrain. What could go wrong? Longevity anyone?

    I have a 2007 V6 Accord which has been pretty much trouble free over 165K miles.

    I would not purchase the current Accord or other Honda vehicle.

    Perhaps my mistake but I would look mainly at Toyota or Mazda because of their products and local dealer attitude.

    Detroit products would need another decade for reputation recovery. Perhaps they could hire some Korean management gurus to shorten that recovery period.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      I agree that some Toyotas are still worth buying and that certain Mazdas are worth rolling the dice on. Were I you, I would still pay for the 2nd timing belt/water pump service on your Accord in another 35K miles. It has a better future than the Accords sitting on new car lots today.

      • 0 avatar
        volvo

        Only repair the 2007 Accord has needed is a new starter.

        I ran the numbers last month and even factoring in engine or transmission replacement on the existing 2007 and assuming no post warranty failure in a new Accord the 5 year TCO for our 2007 is 1/2 that of a new Accord (mainly due to sales tax, registration and depreciation).

        Plus I prefer the styling on the 2007.

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          Provided you’ve performed the occasional transmission drain and fill with Honda DW-1 ATF and changed the oil every 5K miles, you probably won’t be replacing anything bigger than a power steering pump for the first 400K miles.

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            ^ All this!

            Do the next timing belt/water pump, and just keep running it.

            We’ll see how well the Honda turbo thing shakes out. Two years ago at this time, I was crying in my beer over the V6 loss, and now I’ve got one of those new-fangled tur-bo-chargar things! My only concern is the long-term durability, but in my research, replacement of the turbo, all in, is a hundred or so LESS than a timing belt service! We’ll see!

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    I followed a Blue Accord today, similar to the one in the picture; I believe the wheels were different though. This is a handsome car, the windows need tinted though. I noticed dual exhaust tips from beneath the rear bumper, one each side. Not encased in a chrome outlet, just old school tips.

    It is a large car, which I like. Maybe one day this will get on the list when it is time to change out one of my fleet.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      The exhaust tips are ornamental — apparently, if they would have routed those through the bumper, the heat would have been an issue.

      That Accord is a Sport in Still Night Pearl. You probably saw the darker blue, Obsidian Blue Pearl. That first one’s a looker, about the same brightness as my Radiant Red Metallic Touring. (And if I could actually find out how to update my avatar on this site, I’d have a pic up!) The latter is a little too dark, which means my OCD would be off the charts trying to keep it looking nice! Apparently, the Sport wheels are also pretty popular with the slippery-fingers set! Wheel locks are a good idea!!

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    Where’s that ‘the market has spoken’ cultural marxist? I’m a real live former-new-Honda buyer. I currently own three K-series, port injected Honda/Acura products, all purchased new for my family. I wouldn’t touch a turbocharged, direct-injected small displacement car if a flood put me in the market for three new cars tomorrow. Honda should have tried harder in the face of Obama’s command economy. I’m sorry for their workers, who only deserve this if they voted for Obama or Hitlary.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      How about the hybrid?

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      Honest question, what about these engines do you not like?

      I have 3 GM LS powered vehicles; 2 5.3 w/ 4L60 and 1 LS2 w/ 6 MT and a Buick with the 3.6 V6 so you could very easily make the argument that I am an automotive luddite. I have my concerns about the plethora of high pressure small CID turbo engines available these days. I am not 100% certain they will last as long as the standard N.A V6 or V8 and am curious to know the thoughts of someone who has actually spent their own money on one.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      Unfortunately, Honda started drinking the green Kool-Aid early.

      Current CR-V 1.5T troubles aside, Honda usually gets it right when they implement stuff like DI later than the rest of the manufacturers. As stated in a thread above, I’ll give them a chance here — it was either that or go to another maker’s wares, and after 25 years, I’m aware of some Honda quirks, and I didn’t feel comfortable enough to try something else.

      Once I hit 15,000 or 20,000 miles, I might have my dealer’s service department pull a spark plug and put a scope down the hole and check for valve deposits. Again, anecdotally, when I’ve asked them if deposits are an issue since Honda added DI to the K24s in the last-generation Accords, they’ve said “not really.” Their EGR plumbing might be able to keep that tendency in check.

      All that said, Toyota has probably got the best solution with the dual injection system. (Along with Ford, I think it is?) We’ll see what happens.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      My friend and I regularly run a K series at the strip. Of course we had to boost it to make it fast.

  • avatar
    thejohnnycanuck

    The Corolla is the Civic’s problem. Not only does it have the reputation but both the new sedan and hatch look fantastic.

    Right now Toyota has the upper hand. It’s as simple as that.

    • 0 avatar
      WalthamDan

      Any particular reason you have affection for the latest Corolla JC? lol

      I would still give it to the Civic (just not the hideous hatch version though). I find the the Civic still has a more athletic personality than the Corolla leading to a more fun-to-drive characteristic.

      But the Toyota incentives are greater so the cost conscious buyers will lean towards the Corolla in that regard.

      • 0 avatar
        thejohnnycanuck

        Are you saying my bias is showing? Well I am getting older and gravity does take its toll…

        What’s interesting is that both the Corolla and Civic sales were up in July with the Toyota cracking 30K and the Honda 29K. So why exactly is Honda easing off the gas? Doesn’t make a ton of sense to me.

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        On the Accords, at least, from, IIRC, March through late June, the financing rates through Honda Financial for longer than 36 months (3.9% for three years or less, 4.49% for above) were comparable to current rates through most lenders; unfortunately, I got caught in this trap, and ended up with a 4.4% note for 60 months through a bank for which I have more respect for used toilet paper, despite my top-tier credit score, when I took delivery on June 6th. (Huntington Bank, which has been slamming my condo board with stupid fees and other harassment, not to mention that when visiting the local branch on more than one occasion, I’ve come away convinced that I could have had a more productive outcome talking to a pile of bovine excrement!)

        For the usual President’s Day promotions, HFS had 2.9% up to 36 months, and 3.9% beyond that, which is still not just beer money’s difference over the life of a note! Much to my chagrin, HFS put those rates back into effect around the middle of June, and they wouldn’t consider rewriting a note despite the F&I guy AND THE DEALER PRINCIPAL trying to see if they could make an exception; a customer vehicle is considered “used” the moment it leaves the dealer’s lot — end of discussion, and HFS only writes paper for untitled vehicles which haven’t been sold to customers! My salesman stated in an E-Mail that he probably lost four or five Accord sales during that time period because of that, and during that time, Toyota’s financial arm had a 2.9%/3.9% thing going!

  • avatar
    hamtrelvis

    The colors of remaining 2019 Touring inventory in my neck of the woods are mostly black, a few silver, and a few white — so darn boring.

    I love driving my 2003 Accord EX six cylinder automatic but, as it’s starting to rust around the wheel wells, I’ve been looking at new sedans. The only one that really turns me on is the Lexus ES350, other than the touchpad which is the spawn of hell.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      I had a factory order placed for my Radiant Red 2019 Accord Touring 2.0T. It looks fantastic! The red color mitigates the awkward look of the taillights at the rear, and the black Sport Grille with the Chrome insert gets rid of the “unibrow” look at the front, and also draws the eye away from the hood cut, which is a result of the Accord sharing the Civic platform, probably. Rest assured that there is a difference in interior feel and execution between the Civic and Accord, as has been the case since I was “converted,” along with my Dad and the rest of my immediate family, from an Oldsmobuick guy to a Honda fanboi back in late 1990!

      That’s an option to consider. And since the Accords aren’t selling like hotcakes, you can probably get a better deal than I did with a little haggling. (My 2013 Accord was a brokered transaction at $500 over invoice, and my dealer agreed to those same terms with my new Accord; the broker I had used last time succumbed to pancreatic cancer 18 months ago, and ironically, the deal on my sister-in-law’s Odyssey minivan was likely one of his last.)

    • 0 avatar
      SPPPP

      The metallic gray “Modern Steel” is pretty nice in person, even if it looks bland in photos. The lighter “Lunar Silver” is nice too, if a little bland. More variety in colors would certainly be nice.

  • avatar
    tomLU86

    I hope Joe Brick is wrong, but I think he is correct.

    GM is cutting Equinox production also.

    The stock market is the fattening of the calf…before the slaughter.

    We are drowning in debt at all levels…it’s not sustainable.

    Get your old car in great shape now…

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      The ‘Nox cutting is weird, because those things are everywhere in my area of Northwest Ohio!

      If I had to choose one of the Chevy CUVs, I’d take the Blazer or Traverse, because of V6 availability. (As good as my Accord’s 2.0T is, adding another 500 pounds with the aerodynamics of a barn door can only be a negative, even though I was reasonably impressed with the 1.5T in a CR-V I test-drove; it needs the 2.0T to drive like I’d like it, and since the ‘Nox is probably heavier than the CR-V or even the Acura RDX which has the 2.0T..you see where this is going!)

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        “If I had to choose one of the Chevy CUVs…”

        Personally, were I confronted with this choice I would take that long, hard look in the mirror and seriously evaluate my life choices.


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