By on August 3, 2018

Image: Toyota

Last year’s release of the radically revamped 2018 Toyota Camry lent buoyancy to a model seen as the troubled midsize sedan segment’s most resilient nameplate. It has history, name recognition, and a stigma for no-nonsense comfort and reliability. Could you ask for anything more?

And so, as other sedans, including the equally fresh Honda Accord, started falling away, the Camry retained its sales volume, finishing the first half of 2018 with a slight year-to-date increase. July brought bad news, however. While the Toyota brand performed worse than the industry average last month — sales fell 6 percent, year over year — it was passenger cars that earned the brand its volume loss.

And even the Camry’s partly to blame.

Truth be told, the Camry’s U.S. sales began slipping in March, but the sales lead built up in the preceding months allowed it to coast till summer with a positive, but diminishing, year-to-date figure. July sales figures show that lead gone, replaced by a 2.7 percent YTD loss. The Camry found 22.2 percent fewer buyers last month compared to July 2017.

It looks like the vehicle billed by Toyota as the savior of the midsize segment has joined the club. And it’s in good company.

In July 2018, Honda Accord sales fell 19.3 percent, year-over-year, with volume over the first seven months of the year down 14.5 percent. The Hyundai Sonata doesn’t fare any better — it’s down 10.3 percent for the month and 26.7 percent for the year. Meanwhile, the Ford Fusion, a sedan already slated for execution, found 22.1 percent fewer buyers in July and 19.2 fewer buyers in 2018 as a whole.

It’s a similar story with Nissan’s Altima, a vehicle that sees its own dramatic revamp this fall. Altima sales sank 28.2 percent, year over year, in July, and 17.1 percent over the first seven months of the year. What about the recently refined Mazda 6, you ask? Now boasting available turbocharged power and the mildest of facelifts, Mazda’s midsizer saw its sales drop 36.4 percent in July, pushing its YTD figure into the red (down 5.6 percent).

2019 Optima

As General Motors chooses to hold Chevrolet Malibu figures hostage, we’ll skip over that model and focus on the only low-priced midsize to see a year-over-year increase in July: the Kia Optima, which rose 37.6 percent. Granted, Optima sales cooled off in earnest in July of 2017, so last month’s volume isn’t some sort of spike in popularity. Nor can the Optima claim a TYD increase. It’s down 14.6 percent since the New Year.

Despite gains at Volkswagen, buyers weren’t turning out in droves for the Passat. No, they walked past that model in the showroom and went straight for the Tiguan and Atlas. Passat sales fell 22.2 percent in July and 34.6 percent since the start of the year.

None of this should surprise anyone, as it’s a trend that’s continued unabated since midsize sedans hit a post-recession high water mark around 2014. Light trucks are king, rising 4.3 percent across the industry in July. It’s cars that are to blame for the industry’s 3.7 percent deflation last month (overall volume is still up 1.1 percent, year to date), as that broad segment shrunk by 18 percent.

The public’s growing thirst for trucks, crossovers, and SUVs meant passenger car market share hit a new low last month, dropping to just 31 percent of new vehicle sales.

[Image: Toyota, Honda, Kia]

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74 Comments on “July 2018 Midsize Sedan Sales: Toyota Camry Finally Slips Into the Red...”


  • avatar
    JohnTaurus

    Ford is so stupid for abandoning this market segment! All they needed to do was build a car as good as Toyota, and they’d be impervious to sales declines.

    /sarcasm

    • 0 avatar
      fIEtser

      If it were electric it would be.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I think Ford DID make a mistake dumping cars. Sales of sedans may be diminishing, but it’s still a volume segment. Oh well…we’ll see.

      In the meantime, those of us who thought well of Ford can comfort ourselves with the fact that gazillions of Ecosports are coming our way from India as we speak. Praise be.

      • 0 avatar
        Sub-600

        The EcoSport can hack your life! Say it’s raining really hard, you can get in your EcoSport, close the door, then turn on the heat and dry off! The 21st Century is about solutions.

      • 0 avatar
        TwoBelugas

        “Those of us who thought well of Ford can comfort ourselves with the fact that gazillions of Ecosports are coming our way from India ”

        Toyota clearly thought a subcompact crossover built in developing countries was a good idea too since they are importing the C-HR from Turkey. Honda agrees with the Mexican built HR-V, likewise with Nissan. So what makes Indian built EcoSports so bad by comparison?

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          “So what makes Indian built EcoSports so bad by comparison?”

          Actually, I wrote the Ecosport up for this site not too long ago.

          https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2018/05/reader-review-fords-ecosport-neither-eco-sport/

          Believe me, very little could be worse than the Ecosport. If the C-HR’s actually worse, then it should come with a “do not drive if you’re clinically depressed” warning sticker.

          • 0 avatar
            TwoBelugas

            “Believe me, very little could be worse than the Ecosport. Drive one for yourself and see.”

            I guess you missed this one from this very site.

            https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2018/07/2018-toyota-c-hr-review-swing-and-a-miss/

            Tim Healey seems to know what he is talking about.

          • 0 avatar
            TwoBelugas

            ” If the C-HR’s actually worse, then it should come with a “do not drive if you’re clinically depressed” warning sticker.”

            That does describe the typical Toyota buyers pretty well so the sticker will leave no Toyota buyers if they all read the warning.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            I wouldn’t speak for Tim, but I think he found the C-HR more underwhelming than awful. The Ecosport’s awful. And you can say lots of things about Toyota, but “junky” isn’t one of them. I strongly suspect you can say that about the Ecosport.

            Seriously, don’t take my word for it. Try one out. The thing’s awful.

          • 0 avatar
            30-mile fetch

            “That does describe the typical Toyota buyers pretty well”

            Beluga,
            I’m asking for a friend. He’s a Toyota owner and is depressed but desperately wants to be well-adjusted like, say, a ridiculous internet a$$. I wasn’t sure how to help him, but it just hit me.

            What kind of car do you drive?

          • 0 avatar
            TwoBelugas

            “I wouldn’t speak for Tim, but I think he found the C-HR more underwhelming than awful”

            You said the Ford looks funny, Tim calls the Toyota Ugly.

            You said the Ford has poor rear seat room, Tim said the Toyota has poor rear seat room and headroom

            You said the Ford is rough in the drivetrain, rides okay but no up-and-go, Tim said the Toyota has bad steering, and a confusingly tuned suspension, and no grunt.

            You say the EcoSport is not fuel efficient at 25/29, The toyota is 27-31. Not a huge difference.

            You call the pricing of the Ford a comedy base price being just under 20k, and the version you drove as 27k. The Toyota starts at 21k and tested at 26k. The C-HR must be a bag of laughs too. Oh and you said the EcoSport tops out at 30k with AWD, Toyota doesn’t offer AWD on the C-HR.

            The Toyota is a CVT, Ford puts in a non-DCT 6 speed auto.

            Not sure how you draw the line between “underwelming” and “awful”, but the two seem fairly apple to apple.

          • 0 avatar
            TwoBelugas

            “Beluga,
            I’m asking for a friend. He’s a Toyota owner and is depressed but desperately wants to be well-adjusted like, say, a ridiculous internet a$$. I wasn’t sure how to help him, but it just hit me.

            What kind of car do you drive?”

            Dear Friend of 30-mile

            Buy a Miata, and don’t worry about what you “friend” says about you behind your back.

            You can always rent a minivan when you have people to carry and a Home Depot truck for mulch runs.

            Signed

            Internet User #2332243528

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            You know, Belugas, now that I think about it I stopped talking to you for a reason. Thanks for reminding me.

          • 0 avatar
            TwoBelugas

            “Big3 Beancounter

            Oh, we’re all curious what TwoBelugas drives. That should be a TTAC QOTD, doncha think?

            I am guessing his mom’s Mercury Marquis, but only when he’s a good boy and rubs her bunions.”

            well. that wins the Internet today I guess. Typical behavior from a Tesla fanboy when things don’t go their way.

            “FreedMike

            You know, Belugas, now that I think about it I stopped talking to you for a reason. Thanks for reminding me.”

            You are welcome, it’s regrettable that contrasting the article you wrote with another review of a vehicle from the same segment as your review causes you such discomfort.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          While the C-HR and HR-V are built in Turkey and Mexico, respectively, they were developed for the (yes) developed markets.

          The EcoSport, however, was developed for BRIC markets, and instead of starting from anew, Ford just decided to save $$ and just bring over the ES.

          Hyundai could have done the same, bringing over the ix25/Creta subcompact CUV which was developed for the BRIC markets, but the US and other developed markets had to wait until a separate, more appropriate model, the Kona, was finished.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        Volume is literally nothing without profit, which is all Ford’s mainstream cars seem to be good for in the US at the moment. No real positives in holding on to market share in a shrinking + profitless segment.

      • 0 avatar
        SD 328I

        Volume but with no profit, better to utilize that capacity on vehicles people are actually buying.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Toyota is Johns very own Pavlovian dinner bell lol

    • 0 avatar

      I agree. On list of the 10 top best selling sedans in 2018 the Ford Fusion is #7. Honda and Toyota dominate the top 4 which includes the Civic and Corolla. Even the Honda Civic sold a few more units then the Toyota Corolla

    • 0 avatar
      Peter Gazis

      I think Ford will quickly introduce a second larger sportscar called Thunderbird. and a small electric car called Capri.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    So Hertz has bought all the Camrys it needs?

    (rimshot)

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      I’ve certainly seen a TON in rental fleets this past year. I almost swapped out for one a few days ago when I had to return a defective Edge Platinum with a horrible cacophony of rattles and suspension clunks (17k miles of… off-roading?). As it was I ended up in a 4cyl Impala. Not a bad car but the 2.5 is slightly overburdened in that application compared to lighter midsizers.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Here in Colorado, rentals all have red and white “fleet” plates, so it’s easy to pick out the fleet queens. I’d conservatively estimate half of the Camrys I’ve seen are from fleets of one kind or another. Ditto for Sentras.

        I suppose the good news is that in a year, you’ll be able to get a really decent deal on a CPO Camry. You could do worse.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          How fitting, my Impala was Colorado plated with the red on white as you described.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            I’ve actually been quite the active renter the last two weeks – first was a Nissan Armada for a family vacation, the second is a Cruze I’m driving while my car’s in the shop (hail).

            The Armada was nice (I forgot how nice a big V-8 was on mountain passes), but holy Jeebus could that think drink gas. I might write ’em both up.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            Ah fascinating, I’m assuming it was a velour-seat equipped SV? I’m seriously considering an ex-fleet one of them as our future family hauler. I recently test drove one and was quite smitten. The way the third row doesn’t completely fold flat is infuriating though.

    • 0 avatar
      RSF

      I rented a Camry for a week from Hertz in Denver last month. It’s been a while since I’ve driven a Camry, and what a disappointment. Crashes over bumps, under-powered, felt like it was built cheap.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        “Crashes over bumps, under-powered”

        What trim did you drive?

        I’ll agree on the interior feeling cheap, but I thought the ride in my LE was absolutely sublime and easily one of the car’s strengths (best I’ve experienced in a midsizer). Likewise acceleration was just about best in the base engine midsize class that I’ve tried (1.6EB Ford, 1.5T Malibu, 1.8T Passat, 2.5NA Altima, 2.4NA Optima/Sonata, etc). That new 8 speed does some really crisp and fast upshifts when pressed, and the 2.5 with DI, as clattery and unrefined as I think its’ gotten gets high praise from me for power and MPG.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        “Crashes over bumps, under-powered”

        What trim did you drive?

        I’ll agree on the interior feeling cheap, but I thought the ride in my LE was absolutely sublime and easily one of the car’s strengths (best I’ve experienced in a midsizer). Likewise acceleration was just about best in the base engine midsize class that I’ve tried (1.6EB Ford, 1.5T Malibu, 1.8T Passat, 2.5NA Altima, 2.4NA Optima/Sonata, etc). That new 8 speed does some really crisp and fast upshifts when pressed, and the 2.5 with DI, as clattery and unrefined as I think it’s gotten gets high praise from me for power and MPG.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    Fleet sales must be down.

    Same w/ Altima.

    • 0 avatar
      azmtns

      I had an Altima last week as a rental and put about 1000 miles on it. What a piece.

      • 0 avatar
        Liger

        I had a rental Altima last month for a week. I put about 700 miles on it. I figured I would hate it, but I didn’t. It was ugly, but it was roomy, quiet, the seats were very comfortable, and it got 35 mpg even when I treated the accelerator pedal like a light switch. It didn’t handle very well, but I figured out the limits pretty quickly and it was predictable when you threw it into a corner. It was very slow, yet when I put the shifter into ‘S’, it would have fake shift points which avoided the rubber band effect of the cvt.

        Nothing drives better than a rental :-)

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          A similar view on the Altima. I put about 500 miles on one in June and I walked away not getting the hatred. It’s sure better than a comparable Malibu and I would take one over the ‘bu in a heartbeat. The Fusion is better than both and I would notch the Camry one slot below.

          I found it was acceptably competent, good visibility, OK seating, the technology worked, and got good gas mileage. For a rental sled, what more would you want?

    • 0 avatar
      VW4motion

      Exactly, even car renters are pushing back on the Crapmry.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    People no longer want dull sedans when they can have a dull crossover for just a bit more. Dull lives! It’s just now 8″ off the ground and has a tailgate

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      In the end, this may end up a good thing for sedan buyers who care about driving – the sedans that survive will be the ones that drive the best (and apparently the Camry falls in this category). Survival of the fittest. And I also think the hot-compact segment is making a comeback.

      If sedans are becoming more of a niche, then at least they’re for *our* niche.

      • 0 avatar
        burgersandbeer

        I hope this ends up being true, but it is hard to see it happening with current design trends.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        Midsize sedans still don’t quite cut the mustard there. I like my Optima SXL a lot more than I thought I would, even on cheap tires and fading shocks. But compared to something like an Elantra Sport or Civic Si? No contest. Hundreds of lbs lighter, several inches less wheelbase, available stickshifts….

        I think the only thing really keeping midsize sedans alive are rental fleets and people who need room for rear facing child seats who don’t want or can’t afford crossovers. And even that’s fading. Civic and Corolla have about as much total legroom as many midsizers. I regret not buying a Civic over my Optima.

  • avatar
    TwoBelugas

    I’m sure it has nothing to do with the fact that the new Camry’s front end makes the whenever-2017 models look semi-decent.

  • avatar
    TwoBelugas

    “I don’t know if any of you have heard this yet, but the best selling car by revenues in America is the Tesla Model 3.”

    Who’s the Tesla and what is a model 3? These guys must be drowning in profit!

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Uh…

      • 0 avatar
        TwoBelugas

        “I guess its easier for TwoBelugas to repeat these lies than to spend a minute and actually read Tesla’s 10Q.”

        says Big3 Beancounter who just copies and pastes the line “the best selling car by revenues in America is the Tesla Model 3” in a Toyota thread without reading such right wing extremist blog as CNN

        https://money.cnn.com/2018/08/01/news/companies/tesla-earnings-walkup/index.html

        with subtle headlines like

        “Tesla reported the biggest loss in its history”.

        CNN might as well be Infowars with its anti-progress attitudes and incessant spreading of lies.

      • 0 avatar
        TwoBelugas

        “Is it possible for you to drop all the negative anti-America propaganda”

        That darned CNN spreading anti-America propaganda around. Sad!

        “Really, some basic economic literacy would really help you avoid such basic errors.”

        You seem well adjusted and can be reasoned with.

  • avatar
    ajla

    It’s over. Time for a Blazer RS and mulch hauling.

  • avatar

    One problem that may hurt Toyota, is that they don’t include Android Auto or Apple CarPlay whereas all other manufacturers include them. Toyota is justing to include Apple CarPLay in a few 2019 models.

    I like the new Camry style much better than the old style – it is more aggresive

  • avatar

    It is truly amazing how much Ford sucks. Their stock is headed for single digits again.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      There is a story here and I would love to hear it? Did Bill Ford steal the woman of your dreams? Did a loved one die a particulalry gruesome death in a Ford?

      If the latter is true I can certainly understand since I can empathize with that level of loathing as I’ve traveled a long way down that road myself.

  • avatar
    SoCalMikester

    sedans have always been boring and impractical, compared to everything else with a tailgate, liftgate, or hatch. #truth

  • avatar
    arthurk45

    Those sales figures for the Model 3 for July are bogus – not one of those cars was sold in July,or even this year. Those cars were bought years ago when the owner plunked down $1000 and got on the waiting list.

  • avatar
    ryanwm80

    Toyota will need to introduce an all-new Camry every 6 months to maintain sales.

  • avatar
    Oldschool

    It must be a CA thing, but where I live I see brand new cars, especially new sedans on a daily basis. So it could be a regional issue.

    Not a whole lot of Camry’s and barely any new Accords surprisingly, but lots of Hyundai’s, Kia’s, and a ton of BMW 5 Series, Audi A7’s and C-E Class Benzes. This makes sense as more and more wealthy types keep moving to this state while the middle class and poor keep leaving. So seeing really expensive to ultra expensive luxury rides is a common occurrence.

    So if consumers are buying sedans they are either spending a lot of money on one such as the 5 Series, or low end stuff like a Hyundai.

    BTW because it’s CA, gas is very expensive here, and there’s many fuel efficient environmentally conscious minded people that mostly drive small to tiny cars in the majority of the big metros such as L.A. S.D. And S.F. because traffic is so damn bad and they’re so afraid of destroying what’s left of our planet.

    On a daily basis, I lost count on how many new Civics and Corollas I see, more so than Camry’s and Accords. It’s like Californians are not into larger midsize sedans like they used to be, but at the same time I do see many Ford Fusions everywhere I go. It’s probably the only domestic midsizer that is very popular in CA, in San Diego at least. Fords dealership network and advertising is major in this region which I think has a lot to do with it, plus the Fusion being a nice car obviously helps sales. Big cars are pretty much non existent, Cadillacs and Lincoln’s are a rarity and are not considered a legitimate luxury brand anymore in CA as the consumers have spoken.

    CA is the land of imports for the most part and one has to remember CA has a ton of diversity, immigrants from all over the world live here, and these types strictly stick to the imports and Toyota is usually the main brand of choice. Asian people are especially like this, they only drive Japanese cars. I have a feeling that although GM, Ford and even Dodge/Jeep brands have made tremendous strides in quality, styling and reliability over the past several years in many of their models, many Californians feel that American cars are simply not sophisticated enough compared to an import. Not as edgy, nor as daring or technically advanced. In the land of self absorbed and pretentious “Always needing to keep up with Jones” pricks, a new BMW, Audi or even a nice large Crossover usually fits the bill and accomplishes that goal.

    • 0 avatar
      burgersandbeer

      I credit the weather for the resilience of cars in CA. Obviously there are plenty of cars are available with AWD, but I think most consumers picture more ground clearance when they want something to deal with snow. The weather factor pushes the preferences for SUVs over the edge.

      I was skeptical about TTAC’s endless bleating about the CUV takeover until my last visit to MA; over there cars represented maybe 10% of traffic. In the SF Bay Area I would guess cars still represent half of traffic. It’s quite the variety in the bay area too; I don’t see clear favoritism for any particular brand.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      “Not a whole lot of Camry’s and barely any new Accords surprisingly, but lots of Hyundai’s, Kia’s, and a ton of BMW 5 Series, Audi A7’s and C-E Class Benzes. This makes sense as more and more wealthy types keep moving to this state while the middle class and poor keep leaving. So seeing really expensive to ultra expensive luxury rides is a common occurrence.

      So if consumers are buying sedans they are either spending a lot of money on one such as the 5 Series, or low end stuff like a Hyundai.”

      Would have a point, except the Camry was at the BOTTOM in the segment when it came to ATPs; and the Optima’s ATP was pretty high, even beating out the Accord at times due to the top SX-L trim.

      Also, the favorite brand for Hispanics is Toyota (by a good measure).

      Things have likely improved for the current (more “exciting”) Camry (when it comes to ATP), but the previous couple of generations were as “dull as dishwasher” so most buyers weren’t interested in getting higher trims/loading w/ options.

      As for the relative sparsity of the Camry (in relation to the Corolla), why get a Camry when a Prius (in various body-styles) can be had which offer better fuel economy and just as much, if not more practical space?

    • 0 avatar
      SD 328I

      California buys a lot of everything, just to balance your perception out a bit, it’s also the Number 2 market for Ford F150 pick-up trucks, only Texas sells more F150s than California.

      I live in San Diego, and it seems every other vehicle on my street is a full-size domestic truck, even if average gas prices $3.50 and higher per gallon.

      You are right about perception. Californians seems to prefer import cars, but for full-size trucks and BOF SUVs, they definitely think the Domestics have that. Crossovers is a mixed bag, almost 50/50.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      To follow up on this…

      From an LA Times article on 2015 sales.

      “Honda’s Civic and Accord were the top-selling subcompact and standard midsize vehicles, respectively, and were the No. 1 and No. 2 vehicles sold overall, according to research by the California New Car Dealers Assn.

      The organization said 79,656 new Civics and 73,505 new Accords were sold in 2015.

      The Toyota Prius was third in the rankings with 72,040 new vehicles sold, with its Camry and Corolla just behind with 63,290 and 62,553 units, respectively.”

      – So looks like there are plenty of Accords and Camrys on the streets in Cali.

      And for pick-ups…

      “The Ford F-series, the nation’s top-selling vehicle for more than three decades, was the state’s favorite full-size pickup truck, with 44,369 vehicles sold. Chevy’s Silverado was next, with 39,157 units. Ram trailed with 28,050. Among compact pickups, Toyota’s Tacoma dwarfed the competition, with 31,082 trucks sold, compared with No. 2 seller Nissan Frontier’s 7,831.”

      http://www.latimes.com/business/autos/la-fi-hy-california-car-sales-20160217-story.html

      And a big chunk of GM’s sales of GMC Denalis and Escalades are in Cali.

  • avatar

    Fusions are popular because of class leading Fusion Hybrid. 80% of Fusion are hybrids. But of course Ford cannot tolerate that success – it has to terminate Fusion. The trend is that homeless and rich moving to CA (esp from Asia) and the rest of population try to move out while property is overvalued. SF is a $hole – I try to avoid it at any cost. BART is not safe to ride anymore. Usually someone starts harassing you asking for money.

  • avatar
    tylanner

    The Camry has experienced countless similar and even worse sales dips in the past….and you are comparing it to July 2017 when the refreshed model came out.

    The conclusion being presented here that this car is dead, to single out this model and this year, is strong evidence of malignant subjectivity present in nearly every TTAC production.

  • avatar
    VW4motion

    And somehow the Subaru Legacy and Impreza sedan is not having a decrease in sales.

    • 0 avatar
      gottacook

      The Legacy slipped below 3000 sales in July for the first time in years; sure looks like a decrease to me. Moreover, U.S. Legacy sales in 2017 were only 76% of 2016 sales:

      http://carsalesbase.com/us-car-sales-data/subaru/subaru-legacy/

      As for the Impreza, Subaru doesn’t provide separate sales numbers for 4-door sedans versus 5-door (non-Crosstrek) hatchbacks, so how would you know?

    • 0 avatar
      Peter Gazis

      U.S. sales thru July

      Legacy 24,020 down 18.2%
      Impreza 45,200 down 11%
      WRX/STI 17,051 down 10.8%
      BRZ 2,263 down 15.2%

      Car sales are falling. The rates of decline among Subaru’s cars are very average when looked at with competing models.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    On the subject of midsize cars. I have been punished, errr, graced, to have an ’18 Malibu LT1 as a loaner for the past…month.

    Jebus tap dancing Christ, how can anyone buy one of these??? Awful, awful, awful car in so many ways.

    • 0 avatar
      threeer

      Have had a long-term Malibu loaner (my ’17 Cruze, just bought 8 weeks ago, has been living at the dealer’s repair bay for the last 5 of those 8 weeks). It’s a car. There, that about summarizes it. Not great, not bad. Not really anything memorable. And (from my eyes, anyway), looks a bit “squashed” as far as design goes.

      Makes me kinda wish I had looked harder for a manual-trans Civic (used)…but those were unicorns, as are just about most decent-sized manual trans cars.

  • avatar

    Uhh, I’m all for Tesla but it’s losing money. Perhaps the 3 is profitable in some way individually, but the overall company is not (yet). And, your points managed to miss the fact that Tesla’s success thus far has been based on a generous federal (and state) rebate for buyers. Either way, you’re ignoring quite a few facts in order to claim profitability and success.

  • avatar
    Oldschool

    How is the car awful? I test drove an 18 Malibu and it wasn’t terrible, just not great. The Fusion still has more luxurious exterior trimming and a higher end look to it, but even the Fusions interior is long in the tooth and hasn’t been redesigned since the new model came out in what, back in 2012 or 13?

    The Impala is honestly the only sedan that GM/Chevy excelled at with flying colors and if you look up at consumer reviews on the Impala, it’s all positive and high praised for the most part. No reliability issues, no funky tech issues, nothing..

    But it’s only worth it when you buy the LT model with the 3.6 V6. It’s extremely smooth, quiet and wonderful to drive.

    In response to a previous poster regarding seeing a lot of trucks and SUV’s in San Diego although gas prices are around $4.00 a gallon, I as well see a ton of trucks out here. It depends on where you live though in the county. East County with our mixture of suburban to semi-rural to all rural environment, pickups are a common sight out there on the daily. But head North or into the more urban parts of the City and County and it’s mostly a mix of midsize sedans, small CUV’s, hybrids, luxury cars, and some trucks sprinkled in.

    San Diego isn’t all about the beaches and sunshine, they’re many parts of town that you swear thought you were in Texas or Alabama. Where Bro Dozers and Hick trucks are a plenty.

  • avatar
    cognoscenti

    “But it’s only worth it when you buy the LT model with the 3.6 V6. It’s extremely smooth, quiet and wonderful to drive.”

    I’ve had both versions of the new Impala – the 2.5 4-cylinder and the 3.6 V6. I actually preferred the 2.5! It felt more balanced and the car handled noticeably better. When I had the V6 car, the front end felt noticeably heavier and I recalled wanting the 2.5 back, even though it was a bit breathless at the upper end of the tach.

    I’d still buy either one – I found the Impala to be an absolute home run for GM.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      I just returned a 2.5 LT rental last Friday, and have had one in the past as well for a 8 hour highway drive. The 2.5 is nowhere as rough or as slow as I thought it would be, and the rest of the Impala is a really decent place to spend time in, very well sorted suspension. What I hate about it is the abysmal rear visibility mostly, and the stop-start highlights the 2.5L’s gruffness (very well muted in this application otherwise, even when wound-out somewhat). My biggest issue with the Impala is that aside from the huge trunk, it doesn’t do anything better than the typical midsizer, a Kia Optima LX, for example. And that Kia I had returned an incredible 43mpg on a long highway drive to the Impala’s decent but unremarkable 33 mpg. The V6 gives the Imp some credibility, with the 2.5, it’s merely a decent car. I guess it speaks well though to how good GM sedans have gotten.

  • avatar

    Just wait until gas is back over $4/gallon.

  • avatar
    raph

    I’ve seen a few Model 3’s going down the road. If ever there was a lifestyle statement car, aside from the Prius, the Model 3 is it. In the flesh I find nothing exciting about that car. Its as if Tesla is preparing us for our autonomous people pod future.

    Sigh… Tesla could really use Henrik Fisker and while the Karma was a hybrid it at least made a possible electric future exciting.

  • avatar
    TACOBOUTIT

    No one seems to talk about the ELEPHANT in the room. How hideous the exterior of the Accord looks. It’s like 4 cars mashed into one. Front screams charger. Side screams impala and Malibu but with extra dose of ugliness. And rear says sonata. It’s a pathetic design. It’s asthetics are horrendous


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