By on May 14, 2018

Image: 2017 GMC Yukon

The current generation of General Motors’ full-sized SUVs has become the dominant force in the segment. The six nameplates offered up by GM own seventy-five percent of America’s full-sized, body-on-frame, truck-based SUV market. The GMC Yukon and GMC Yukon XL are a big part of that dominance. Their high average transaction prices and robust sales have helped build General Motors’ fastest growing brand into a sales powerhouse.

The Yukon has always been a luxurious, yet restrained, step above the Tahoe and Suburban, and the 2015 model boosted the upscale feel with the addition of better materials like real wood. A more powerful engine further differentiated the model from its Chevy sibling. Unfortunately, the 420 horsepower 6.2 liter V8 was only available on the Denali-trimmed Yukons.

That is, until the 2019 GMC Yukon hits dealer lots. But there’s a catch.

The Yukon twins have added around 175,000 units to GM’s sales totals the last two years. While that is significantly less than combined Chevrolet Tahoe and Suburban sales, the Yukon and Yukon XL print money from the top of Truck Mountain. Fifty-four percent of Yukon and sixty-three percent of Yukon XL sales are Denali. That means that, in the last two years, General Motors has sold 100,000 or more Yukon and Yukon XL Denalis. The cheapest version of these trucks starts at an MSRP of $66,200.

For 2019, the GMC Yukon continues its recipe for success. There are no major changes to the Yukon Denali or the base trim level. There is, however, an interesting package added to the SLT trim level on both the Yukon and Yukon XL, according to the MY2019 GMC fleet order guide.

Enter the GMC Yukon Graphite Edition.

2018 Chevrolet Tahoe RST

Following a similar formula to the Chevrolet Tahoe RST (seen above), the Graphite Edition Yukon strips away most of the chrome trim and replaces it with gloss black accents. The package includes 22-inch bright machined wheels with Carbon Flash Metallic pockets, black assist steps with Gloss Black accents, Black Chrome grille mesh inserts and fog lamp surround, body-color grille surround, Gloss Black beltline moldings, and the Z85 Suspension Package.

For those that demand the goodness that is General Motors’ 6.2-liter V8, you’ll have to step up to the Graphite Performance Edition. This package includes the aforementioned 6.2L V8 engine, a 10-speed automatic transmission, 22-inch six-spoke Black wheels, LPO, an 8-inch diagonal Driver Information Center, Head-Up Display, 8-inch diagonal Color Touch Screen Navigation with GMC Infotainment System, a trailer brake controller, 170-amp alternator, 3.23 axle ratio, two-speed active transfer case on 4WD models, and Magnetic Ride Control. The Graphite Edition is also a requirement of the Graphite Performance Edition.

Until now, if a Yukon buyer wanted the 6.2L V8, 10-speed automatic, and Magnetic Ride Control, they would have to check the Denali box. Now they have another option. However, without these packages, the MSRP of the 2018 Yukon SLT is $58,495. Pricing hasn’t been announced, but the Graphite and Graphite Performance Edition will surely close the gap between the SLT and Denali in terms of price.

Summed up, the 6.2L V8 and 10-speed transmission powertrain combination is available on a lower trimmed Yukon. It just won’t cost you much less.

[Images: General Motors, Matthew Guy/TTAC]

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71 Comments on “2019 GMC Yukon Graphite Edition: Reaching for That Elusive V8...”


  • avatar
    Sigivald

    22″ wheels?

    Why, God, why?

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Better ride. Less wallowing. Less sidewall flexing. Quicker steering response. Less rolling resistance. Better styling.

      • 0 avatar
        VW4motion

        +1

        • 0 avatar
          TwoBelugas

          better handling and such, sure, I can see the argument. But better ride? I don’t know about that.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            Do not dismiss the power of the sidewall. I’m very happy to have 17 in rims over the premium 19 in on the vehicle I’m driving.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Radial vs Bias-belted tires.

            When the auto industry switched to radial-ply tires they essentially switched to a totally different style of suspension from before that also incorporated the unsprung-weight as part of the vehicle ride/handling/braking equation and allowed nitrogen gas and electro-magnetic dampening in the shock absorbers or struts.

            Where bias-belted, less flexible tires work better for trailers, the larger, lighter wheels with radial tires have less unsprung weight and provide a better controlled ride with tighter handling/braking.

          • 0 avatar
            TwoBelugas

            I’ve been in a 22 inch wheeled Yukon and I thought it rode like crap

            Apparently I’m not alone

            http://www.motortrend.com/cars/gmc/yukon/2016/

            ” The optional 22-inch chrome wheels, however, detract from the SUV’s ride quality even when it’s equipped with Magnetic Ride Control.”

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            @TwoBelugas, you reminded me of something my daughter said while standing next to my mother-in-law’s 20 in wheeled GMC.

            “Grammy’s wheels are TOO BIG!”

          • 0 avatar
            TwoBelugas

            @Dan

            I was appalled when my previous 1500 came with 20 inch wheels. It rode okay on P tires but even then there wasn’t enough sidewall for my taste.

            Luckily the 2500 I drive now came with 18 inch wheels. Still a little big but the brake rotors are massive so I guess “it do”… almost 8 inchest of sidewall is a thing of beauty on what I call the “hillbilly limousine” .:)

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            An interesting outtake from Lutz’ Car Guys vs Beancounters was how he bought to strip away various company wide design/engineering specs and standards that went back decades, these often had to do with durability or extreme temperature situations but in everyday use lead to the cars begin constrained on flashy styling or kept interior features from working as well/smoothly. One example he gave was a spring-driven ash tray that shot out violently from the GM and then had to really be crammed back in with force. An Acura by comparison gracefully glided out and could be gently pressed back in. That was a GM requirement that the ashtray still open at -40C. Finally getting to the topic at hand of wheel sizes: Another engineering/durability requirement that GM USED to have was all of their cars had to be able to drive over a 4 inch tall piece of steel in the road at speed and not sustain damage to the tires or suspension. Lutz proudly stated he got rid of this requirement so they could put “cool” big wheels on their cars. Nice job Lutz! :/

            HDC I have no idea where you’re getting this “rides better” with big wheels nonsense, it’s just that: nonsense.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            gtem, I had a rental 2016 Expedition EL 4×4 with the 20” wheels and I thought it had a good, solid, responsive ride, without harshness or jolting.

            To hear some of the B&B tell it, all cars should come with 13” wheels because they ride so good.

            Well……, tires have a lot to do with it too, like maybe on 20”/22” wheels tires are designed and engineered to give a better ride on X-large wheels.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            “gtem, I had a rental 2016 Expedition EL 4×4 with the 20” wheels and I thought it had a good, solid, responsive ride, without harshness or jolting.”

            Dollars to donuts it would have ridden even better on 18 inch wheels, without a noticeable deterioration in handling.

      • 0 avatar
        dartman

        “Better ride. Less wallowing. Less sidewall flexing. Quicker steering response. Less rolling resistance. Better styling.”

        The only remote truth in these “alternative facts” is the last; and even that is subjective…

      • 0 avatar
        incautious

        And more sidewall damage. I sometimes think that the OEMs are in cahoots with the tire manufacturers now a days. Tires last longer unless you hit a pothole with them. No more 60,000 plus miles when you got a bubble. and the beauty in that, at least for the tire guys, is you almost always have to replace the tire in pairs$$$$$$

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          “you almost always have to replace the tire in pairs$$$$$$”

          That makes sense when it comes to equal tread wear.

          But during my last trip to CA we had what looked like a screw driver puncture the driverside rear tire on our Sequoia and I wasn’t about to replace both of those puppies. We’re talking BIG BUCKS here.

          So I replaced only the terminally damaged tire with a similar-tread later-version Yokohama and pressed on.

          To this day the newest tire has not been rotated and seems to like where it is located. Seems to wear well.

          I did rotate the other three tires ~ every 5K miles. A three-point rotation instead of a four-point rotation.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Less rubber. More frequent tire replacement. More chance of curb rash.

      • 0 avatar
        thx_zetec

        I was going to say that Giant wheels are fer ‘tards.

        But that would be insulting, to the mentally disabled.

        Ride worse heavier fragile expensive.

      • 0 avatar
        Tele Vision

        Worse ride, actually. Much more unsprung mass – bad for handling and braking and, well, everything. Softer spring rates are required to account for lack of sidewall – worse handling. On a behemoth like this handling shouldn’t be a ‘thing’ but huge wheels make everything worse. There are many reasons why F1 cars run 13″ wheels…

    • 0 avatar
      MoparRocker74

      In my experience any wheel diameter over 18″ is absurd unless we’re talking something with dual rear wheels. I took the factory 20’s off of two vehicles (’05 Ram 1500 2wd; ’09 Challenger R/T) for 17″ torq thrusts and 18″ Boss 338s respectively. My car and truck looked, performed, rode, handled, stopped better in EVERY way. Literally no drawback whatsoever.

      The ‘styling’ of clown shoe wheels is subjective, personally I think it looks about as appealing as a butthole sandwich. That said…

      These things are HEAVY. That translates to lousy acceleration, braking, and ride.

      The lack of sidewalls means these tires don’t last as long. And with no cusion between the road and a giant aluminum ingot bolted to your suspension, you don’t EVEN want to know what its doing to your suspension, crashing over road imperfections.

      • 0 avatar
        Sub-600

        I’ve got 19” wheels on my Charger R/T and it accelerates, brakes, and rides quite nicely. Looks great doing it too.

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        I’d like to see optional upsized wheels described on the build & price feature as such:

        “Enhance the look of your Yukon with the optional 22-inch giant aluminum ingots that sucker punch your suspension right in the face over every pothole while looking about as appealing as a butthole sandwich”

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        >”In my experience any wheel diameter over 18″ is absurd unless we’re talking something with dual rear wheels.”

        Even then, DRW trucks have smaller wheels from the factory for more sidewall. Any F-350 or Ram 3500 DRW will have 17″ wheels, even on trims that offer factory 20″s for the SRWs. Class 4 and above use 19.5″s, but that’s a whole ‘nother beast entirely.

    • 0 avatar
      The Comedian

      This very site argued against them a while back

      https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2016/04/important-advice-buy-gmc-yukon-denali-doesnt-look-like-yukon-denali/

      My 16 tahoe came with 20’s. I bought off the lot so I got stuck with them.

      I run 17” steel rims in the winter and the ride is far better.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      One of the few good reasons for wheels to increase in size is to fit larger brakes, and AFAICT, this doesn’t have any larger than standard brakes. 17-18″ is the perfect size for modern full-size trucks/SUVs; 20″ is okayish. 22″ is right out.

  • avatar
    VW4motion

    This vehicle is a prime example on why the American luxury sedan is dying.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      The Escalade did that in spades, especially with the end-of-model-year discounts.

      The discounts put them in reach of people other than hip-hop moguls.

      • 0 avatar
        VW4motion

        This GMC model has the luxury of the Escalade without the stereotype. The grill looks hideous Escalade anyway.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Not my choice either although I have owned a few Suburbans over the decades.

          But all things considered, GM sells every one they make and could sell more if they could make more in TX, in spite of the US Gov’t having first dibs at them.

          I was driving North on I-25 a few weeks ago and an all-black Escalade passes me like a bat out of hell, red and blue lights flashing in the grill and windshield, radio antennas like a porcupine sticking out all over the roof.

          Clearly not a cop car but a very important person in there no doubt.

          Looked more like a Secret Service or Diplomatic Corps vehicle than a hip-hop artist ride.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      This vehicle and other GM ones similar to it (same chassis whether Chevy, GMC) demonstrate how lemming-like and ignorant Americans buying these are.

      These are not good vehicles as adjudged against the new Ford Expedition and Dodge Durango, which both are far more refined, able to tow, trail and do everything the GM dinosaurs can, while offering up better transmissions, fuel economy, acceleration and way better interiors.

      GM makes $hit, largely. Uncompetitive, overpriced $hit.

      http://www.motortrend.com/cars/chevrolet/tahoe/2018/ford-expedition-vs-chevrolet-tahoe-vs-dodge-durango-vs-toyota-sequoia-vs-nissan-armada/

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “GM makes $hit, largely. Uncompetitive, overpriced $hit.”

        Probably. But still, please never link to the chuckleheads of Motor Trend again to make a point unless that point is “Motor Trend sucks”.

        • 0 avatar
          TwoBelugas

          “These are not good vehicles as adjudged against the new Ford Expedition and Dodge Durango, which both are far more refined, able to tow, trail and do everything the GM dinosaurs can, while offering up better transmissions, fuel economy, acceleration and way better interiors.”

          I like the Durangom but is a unibody, and its tow rating is 2000 lbs less than the Tahoes, so no sure how you made the above conclusion. The Ford’s turbo V6 is hated by most buyers in the segment it shows in the Ford’s lackluster sales.

          Curious, when Toyota makes segment leaders that appear generic and use older drivetrain, they are hailed as “they know how what the market wants”. When GM does it, they sell overpriced vehicles. Yikes.

          “This vehicle and other GM ones similar to it (same chassis whether Chevy, GMC) demonstrate how lemming-like and ignorant Americans buying these are.”

          The same can be said of Camry, Rav4, Highlander, etc buyers then.

          • 0 avatar
            Maxb49

            ” The Ford’s turbo V6 is hated by most buyers in the segment it shows in the Ford’s lackluster sales.”

            Honestly, the Ford Turbo V6 is not a *bad* engine. I have one in a Lincoln. It is powerful & reliable. There are examples with 400,000 miles on them now. The problem is the with the engine’s complexity. It’s going to be an expensive fix/impossible proposition if you’re the rare person who does receive a problem engine. The engine’s advantages do not offset the engine’s drawbacks. It sounds awful. It doesn’t get better fuel economy than a V8 (and why should it? Two engines making the same power output must burn exactly the same amount of fuel as per the law of conservation of energy). Ford would dominate this market if they just offered the 5.0.

            “GM makes $hit, largely. Uncompetitive, overpriced $hit.”

            The Suburban is a lot of things. Uncompetitive and chit aren’t two of those things.

      • 0 avatar
        Peter Gazis

        @DeadWeight

        Uncompetitive products that sell like Hotcakes.

        I think you and the writers at Motortrend
        need to take some laxatives. Come back when you’re no longer full of ____!

  • avatar
    Dilrod

    Graphite? How is that a status symbol? Does it come with a pencil sharpener?

  • avatar
    golftdi

    How about some standard led or xenon headlights? It’s a joke that this and the Tahoe don’t come with them standard, yet you can get them in a $16k corolla.

    • 0 avatar
      Cactuar

      I did wonder about that before. Let’s say the Corolla’s LED headlights cost an extra 100$ per vehicle vs halogen lights. Is this 100$ amount the same regardless of which OEM adds LEDs? Is the tech the same, and is the implementation cost the same regardless of the brand? If a Corolla of all cars has LED lights, why don’t all cars come equipped with LED’s then?

      TTAC please get someone from purchasing or whoever to answer these questions.

      • 0 avatar
        MrIcky

        I’m trying to find an article that I read about that, but GM basically said that although trendy, LEDs don’t necessarily have brighter higher quality light. They appeared brighter when you look at them, but that’s only because it’s a smaller more intense source- it was the same lumen output overall. They had a big investment in their reflectors and they felt they were getting a better, more even spread. They also thought that LEDs in trucks were a poor solution because the height of the lights. It was harder to angle leds because the shape of the output was better controlled by lenses than reflectors and they’d end up blinding oncoming traffic without actually putting out more lumens.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          But they’ll let you upgrade to them? :-/

          I’ve noticed almost every GM vehicle has LEDs as part of an upgrade as you move up trim levels or purchasable as part of a “package” (Like “Driver Confidence” or some other marketing gobblety gook.)

          So: “LEDs suck but if you really want them we’ll sell them to you.”

        • 0 avatar
          TwoBelugas

          LED emitters have historically struggled with surface area brightness versus overall lumen output. The higher power LEDs require a large optic to focus correctly due to a large die size, whereas running multiple smaller LEDs with individual optics is tremendously difficult to produce the kind of pattern that works for automobiles. That’s all before the can of worms involving heatsinks.

          Either way it’s not as simple as throwing a reflector on an LED board and call it a day.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    Slightly random question- given that 99% of these are asphalt warriors, why not offer the forced-induction Corvette V8s in some zooty trim?

    • 0 avatar

      Someone said zooty, where’s that guy who hates this word?

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        Zooty zootin’ zoot-n-zoot. Zut!

        But yeah, GM’s leaving money on the table. There must be some domestic intenders who feel emasculated by the boosted Benzes, Rovers, and BMWs their neighbors have.

        • 0 avatar

          Ha.

          I think there will always be people willing to pay too much money for sports tinsel. I mean, look at cars like the ES350 F-Sport.

          • 0 avatar
            TwoBelugas

            the GMT K2s are selling well and the margins on a special edition with another engine may be much lower than a well optioned but mass produced Denali/whatever once you factor in all the additional costs involved that cannot be spread across large number of units.

            Also, thou shall not threaten the Escalade, and such. The typical Tahoe/Suburban/Yukon buyers I know don’t give a second thought what their neighbors in the euro unibodies think anyway.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “Also, thou shall not threaten the Escalade, and such”

            Yeah that worked out so well for all of the failed sporty models because ooooo can’t get too close to Corvette.

    • 0 avatar
      Caboose

      Bumpy’s right, though: Why can’t we have a Tahoe ZL1 to compete against/blow away the Trackhawk?
      As a confirmed breeder, I’d love to have a Suburban ZL1 or an Odyssey Type R.

    • 0 avatar
      Maxb49

      “Slightly random question- given that 99% of these are asphalt warriors, why not offer the forced-induction Corvette V8s in some zooty trim?”

      The fallacy implicit in this comment is that a Suburban should be an off-road vehicle to be practical. That is not the case. The Suburban is supposed to be a durable vehicle built for hauling with four wheel drive capability.

  • avatar
    Caboose

    Bumpy’s right, though: Why can’t we have a Tahoe ZL1 to compete against/blow away the Trackhawk?
    As a confirmed breeder, I’d love to have a Suburban ZL1 or an Odyssey Type R.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    Big duds and sporty red brake calipers on a BOF SUV platform designed to tow and haul. That’s about as useful as skid plates and KO2s on an Accord.

    Equip the truck do truck things.

  • avatar

    The 20″ wheels on our Expedition Platinum rode hard. Downsized to the 18″ from the limited and it made a big difference. I would imagine it’s the same here as at least the Expy has independent rear suspension to help out.

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      I like The FX4 package on the Expedition. Comes with nice 18″ wheels.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      The 2016 Expedition EL 4×4 I had as a rental had 20″ wheels on it and I thought the ride was good (over the > 3500 miles we put on that trip).

      I didn’t care for the Ecoboost V6. At low take off speed you could feel the thump of every cylinder detonation.

      But on cruise, 75 – 85 mph, it ran great, was quiet inside the cabin, no tire noise, smooth and rock-steady rolling down the highway.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    I’ll be glad when the all-black vehicle fad dies out. Darth Yukon?

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Wasn’t that caused by a shortage in color pigments? I remember reading that a long time ago.

      Black doesn’t work for hi-temp desert climes unless you can park that blackness under a shelter, like they do in Phoenix, AZ.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      I dislike black wheels and blacked out trim on most vehicles as well. Occasionally, blacked out trim works fine, other times its too much.

      I do like that the wheels have lighter colored pockets, that’s at least better than all glossy black.

  • avatar
    jack4x

    I love the 6.2 and applaud any effort to spread availability.

    That said:

    We are entering the 6th model year for this engine. How is it still unavailable a la carte in the trucks and SUVs yet? Or more to the point, why can I not get it in anything approximating a work truck? No 8 foot bed available with the 6.2 for any price. No cloth seats or base SUV. Ford will happily sell me anything down to a 2WD RCSB F150 XL with either the 3.5TT or 5.0, so what gives GM?

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      GM always does stupid stuff like this. You can only have the 350 in a certain model/trim combination so you default to the 305 or 307. You can only have the 4.3 in a certain model/trim combination so you default to the 2.8. You can only have Our Lord of Eternal Torque in a certain model/trim combination so you default to the 3100, etc. I think they did this to justify the five to nine marques and various separate distribution channels, but times have changed. Sell me the motor and make me pay for the gingerbread RenCen, otherwise I’ll just walk over to a superior product than what you are offering (OHC and all).

      • 0 avatar
        Maxb49

        “GM always does stupid stuff like this. You can only have the 350 in a certain model/trim combination so you default to the 305 or 307.”

        How true. The 307 was one of the worst engines ever made.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          307 Chevy or 307 Oldsmobile?

          Can’t comment on 307 Chevy but the 307 Olds was as eager to rev as an unbalanced washing machine. I always wanted to grab one, slap a TBI on it and see if that cured all the things I hated about the one I had.

  • avatar
    ernest

    “The current generation of General Motors’ full-sized SUVs has become the dominant force in the segment.”

    No, they were the dominant force in the segment when I bought my ’94. And when I bought my 2000. In fact, it’s not only been the dominant force in this segment, it invented the segment back in the 30’s.

    It’s pretty clear many @ TTAC don’t “get” this market at all. They don’t live in the affluent “ex-urbs” where a Ford Super Duty and a (fill in your favorite big GM SUV here) grace more driveways than you can count. This isn’t an urban hip-hop culture- that’s where the used ones will be found. And it isn’t rural- too much money floating around.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      At one time the Suburban was the GM full-sized SUV. But that has changed to where the Tahoe is now the GM full-sized SUV.

      So what class is the Suburban in?

      And with ” too much money floating around” I think that the new Ford Expedition and Expedition MAX will be the dominant force in the segment.

      The Suburbans have their following, especially within the Federal government and GSA, but the new Expedition is more modern, has better tech, and is squarely aimed at the affluent individuals instead of gov’t service.

      • 0 avatar
        ernest

        @highdesertcat

        “And with ” too much money floating around” I think that the new Ford Expedition and Expedition MAX will be the dominant force in the segment.”

        No- Ford’s always been a bit player in this segment, and the new Expy/Navi changes nothing. At least not in the number of new Denalis/Escalades I see in the general area. Or in the sales figures I see on goodcarbadcar.net. Big GM SUV’s are wife rigs (GM says almost 75% of the buyers or principal drivers are women)- a luxury station wagon that’s mom-friendly, and incidentally has 4WD and can tow a boat. When I was a kid (in an equally affluent suburb, but 40+ years ago), those mom’s would be driving Chrysler T&C or Mercury Colony Park Wagons. An argument could be made that the demographic never left, but shifted to luxury trucks as the luxury cars of choice disappeared because of CAFE. Not incidentally, tax benefits also play into this equation, especially considering the high demographics of this segment.

        “So what class is the Suburban in?”

        Same class as the Yukon/YukonXL or the Escalade/EscaladeESV. In other words, no difference. Ones a slightly smaller version of the other.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          ernest, thank you for the elaboration.

          Although I have owned several Suburbans over the decades past I am not a fan, but choose our 2016 Sequoia over the Suburban and Tahoe.

          But I was impressed with the 2016 Expedition EL 4×4 we had as a rental. IMO, it is far more advanced than the Suburban or Tahoe, rides better and handles better.

          In my part of the country the GM Suburban line is known as the Texas Cadillac. In my younger days, our station wagon was a 1972 Olds Custom Cruiser with the 454.

          Today, the wife rig is a 2016 Sequoia 4×4.

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      The current generation increased its market share over the previous generation. But yes, GM has owned the full sized SUV segment for the better part of a century. The level in which they make money and n these vehicles is higher than ever though.

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