By on April 6, 2018

2018 Subaru WRX STI, Image: Subaru

For some reason, today is all about manual transmissions. Some going, some staying… but most just going.

That’s the world we live in, where consideration must be given to high-tech safety aids, while multi-cog automatics and infinitely cogged CVTs have stripped the stick shift of its secondary attribute: fuel economy.

For Subaru, the Lineartronic continuously variable automatic will soon become the brand’s only choice of gearbox, with one notable — and likely temporary — exception.

Speaking to Australia’s Drive, Subaru of America Tom Doll said the lack of a manual transmission — something we saw during the debut of the 2019 Forester last week — is something Subaru buyers will have to get used to.

“We are only selling three to five per cent of the total volume as manual transmissions and with the fuel economy you get with the CVTs and the way they are leaned out it really makes the manual transmission car look not as efficient or greenhouse gas efficient,” Doll said on the sidelines of the New York auto show.

Subaru, which has no problem selling cars, wants to become known as a safe brand. Like Volvo in the ’80s and ’90s, basically. To do this, the brand wants to put Eyesight driver assist features in every model it sells. As we told you last month, Subaru execs aren’t sure it’s possible to offer a manual transmission that’s compatible with the EyeSight system, nor would it be cost effective to develop one, given the low demand.

Still, one model demands a transmission choice, at least in the near term: the WRX and its brawnier STI twin. (The BRZ can’t be counted on to exist for all that much longer.)

Built on the old platform now abandoned by the current Impreza and related Crosstrek, the turbocharged WRX soldiers on for 2018, patiently waiting for an update and platform swap. While WRX buyers now have a choice of six-speed manual or a beefier Lineartronic capable of handling the model’s 268 horsepower and 258 lb-ft of torque, patrons of the 305 hp, 290 lb-ft WRX STI can only choose the stick.

“No, we’ll still have manual transmissions in our performance line like for the WRX, but just not in the Forester,” Doll said when pressed. Tomoyuki Nunome, project manager for the Forester program, seems to back this up. He replied “no” to a question of whether the WRX would go Lineartronic-only.

It’s expected that the next-generation WRX will appear in 2020, possibly with some sort of hybrid assist. How the rumored electrification might impact transmission availability remains to be seen.

[Image: Subaru]

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62 Comments on “Subaru’s WRX Is Safe for Now, but It’s a Two-pedal Future for the Rest...”


  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Are there any stats on what percentage of the US population (especially ones under 50 yrs old) can drive manuals?

    In the mid 1980s the Pentagon decided to spec only automatics because it wasn’t practical teaching a high percentage of recruits how to drive manuals.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    didn’t we just talk about how Subaru doesn’t want to sell anything to me and some other dudes?

  • avatar
    JMII

    Marketing speak translation – once we stop making the WRX in 2020 all our vehicles will be CVT.

  • avatar
    NG5

    the “safety tech” excuse sounds like bull to me. cruise control and auto stop have been implemented in manual transmissions. is it really a problem in an era of self crashing cars if the driver occasionally has to pay attention to push in the clutch or change gears?

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      Isn’t EyeSight all cameras and no radar? IIRC, these cars always lose the safety systems when driving right into the early morning or late evening sun.

    • 0 avatar
      Rocket

      What about automatic braking?

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      All-speed (as in low-low crawl) cruise control, along with automatic braking at low-low speeds (pedestrian type braking) is more troublesome to include in a manual transmission car, as you’d need a clutch actuator. Current cars with Eyesight like safety/convenience suites, omit those low speed functions on the manual models.

      Stability control is also somewhat compromised when disengaging thew driveline is not an option available to the algorithms. But that’s not really Eyesight related.

      • 0 avatar
        NG5

        Good point. The low speed crawling discussion is definitely one that makes a manual more complicated, but when I said somewhat vague “auto-stop” I meant automatic low speed emergency braking – which I think has been implemented on the manual transmission without any computerized clutch control in the Toyota version of the Mazda 2. Consumer Reports talks about its performance as that it will essentially stall the car. Better than an accident but not as wonderful as an automatic in such a case.

        I understand not wanting to go the extra mile to develop stuff for that sort of computerized clutch disengagement, but my point was that some of the effective technologies can be implemented now.

        While I get Subaru’s intent to market safety and efficiency across all their models, I think it’s a bit of a missed opportunity to signal a commitment to driver engagement too. I think the suggestion that people should have less control of the car will look shortsighted from a brand identity point as we continue to have growing pains with active safety technology.

    • 0 avatar
      Thinkin...

      Agreed. See, for example, the Honda Accord Sport: Available with a 6-speed manual, and the full suite of “Honda Sensing” fancy automated safety stuff. Also available on the Fit with a stick, I believe.

      However, weirdly Honda does not offer the safety suite on the Civic with a stick. My guess is that they’ll take some flack in the press for it, and then make it an option for the 2019 models.

  • avatar
    jalop1991

    Boomers getting old.

    I was fine with my ILX 6-speed, but my wife could no longer drive it–bad ankle, needs surgery, hence can’t clutch any more. Such is getting old.

    I wanted a fun car she could drive.

    Enter the GTI DSG.

    Now I have no reason to go back to row your own. None at all. VW DSG is magical. (So is the GTI, for that matter; 35mpg if you drive it normally and leave the trans in D, or else shift it yourself or put it into S and stomp on the pedal and don’t care what the mileage is. YOUR CHOICE.)

    I see an Audi S3 in my future. Maybe a Mk8 Golf R…

    • 0 avatar
      vehic1

      jalop1991: +1. I’ll admit that I love the manuals, but I’m old school there. I think they’re less trouble-prone than more complex automatics – but the sales figures are all that matter in the business. A puny demand for manuals = few or none of them.

  • avatar
    fiasco

    The list of new cars I would consider gets even shorter. Waiting for the autotragique slush box to die in my 97 Volvo…then I don’t know what I’ll get. Still miss my 5 speed Legacy wagon in the winter…

  • avatar
    OneAlpha

    And yet, the manual transmission is the greatest LOW-TECH safety aid there is…

    • 0 avatar
      jfb43

      This. Unless you’re highway cruising, multitasking is way more difficult with a manual, thus I’d venture to say people who drive manuals are less likely to be distracted drivers.

      I wonder if there are solid statistics on this. Accident rate for AT vs. MT vehicles, accounting for their share of the vehicle population. I’d be willing to bet way more automatics are involved in accidents than manuals per capita. I think MT drivers are more engaged and generally care more about driving and are thus likely better to be more aware/better drivers. But I would like to see hard numbers to see if my hypothesis pans out.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        I bet the increased proportion of dumb/aggressive brodude drivers who buy manuals in things like WRXes or Mustangs Because Real Enthusiast swamps any difference in distraction, i.e., I expect the manual accident rate is quite a bit higher.

      • 0 avatar
        jalop1991

        “I’d be willing to bet way more automatics are involved in accidents than manuals per capita. I think MT drivers are more engaged and generally care more about driving and are thus likely better to be more aware/better drivers.”

        That has nothing at all to do with anything.

        In a world where manuals don’t exist, those who otherwise would drive a manual because they like being engaged in driving, will still be engaged in driving and will still be likely better to be more aware/better drivers.

        Unless, of course, you’re saying that by taking away the manual transmission those drivers instantly become the slobbering, mouth-breathing passengers behind the wheel we see every day.

        • 0 avatar
          jfb43

          Well, in this world, manuals DO exist, and people will default to the automatic, typically, unless they desire more involvement in driving (i.e. they actually care about driving). Like how people who care about style are better dressed than those who don’t. Obviously it’s not an absolute thing, but no one who is completely ambivalent to driving ops for the manual (especially nowadays when actually knowing how to drive a manual is becoming a rarity).

          • 0 avatar
            jalop1991

            But manuals won’t exist in a very short period of time.

            And here’s a thought: the reason I switched to an automatic a few months ago was that my wife could physically no longer clutch. What would you have her do? Stop driving?

            VW DSG to the rescue. Solves the problem nicely.

            So people who might otherwise be perfectly happy rowing their own may not be able to. Does that make them suddenly be mouth-breathing simpletons who aren’t paying attention?

          • 0 avatar
            OneAlpha

            jalop,

            “Does that make them suddenly be mouth-breathing simpletons who aren’t paying attention?”

            You know how people are almost expected to move to Florida when they get old?

            I’ve seen these people up close. It’s like they’ve lost something in the move south.

            The flat, always-warm environment and their one-storey luxury condo on the golf course don’t demand anything of their bodies.

            Their bodies aren’t forced to stay tough and capable the same way a Midwestern winter and stairs require a certain basic physical toughness.

            So they move to Florida and wither away – perhaps even dying prematurely – because it’s simply TOO EASY for them to stay alive.

            In the same way, driving a manual activates a certain state of awareness, while rolling a slushbox shuts that awareness off or dulls it.

            So yes, to some degree it DOES make us simpletons if we only use two pedals.

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          When I drive an automatic pickup, I tend to keep a laptop open on the center console top. To get something useful done while suffering the indigity of slush, and to avoid dying from sheer boredom and sorry-state-of-humanity induced depression. A manual gets in the way of doing that, thus probably contributing a bit to safety.

          A manual also forces you to look ahead and anticipate, lest you end up waay out of gear after an unexpected slowdown. That applies even to those for whom manual operation is essentially spinal. Those with less experience with them, will have to remain even more cerebrally engaged, lest they stall out, miss downshifts etc. It’s ridiculously obvious in LA traffic who drives manuals, as they tend to keep a fairly constant distance to the car in front. Picking, and sticking with, a gear low enough to allow precise power metering and engine braking. Rather than rubber-banding, hence creating and exaggerating rolling waves of traffic, with brake lights flickering on and off at seeming random. Not only are the former likely to be more alert on their own, but they are much less annoying to drive behind as well, since they tend to drive much more in phase with cars further in front of them.

          • 0 avatar
            ttacgreg

            This……
            “Rather than rubber-banding, hence creating and exaggerating rolling waves of traffic, with brake lights flickering on and off ” . . .

            In my limited driving experience in Germany in city freeway traffic I found far less of this, and more measured, steady, in unison crawling. I immediately concluded, considering the much higher percentage of MT there that everyone there was doing what I always strive to, and that is to avoid dead stops with the accompanying clutching and shifting.

          • 0 avatar
            OneAlpha

            I don’t know. I think the manuals-in-traffic thing is more cultural than ergonomic.

            People will put up with enormous hassle and difficulty – even enthusiastically seek it out – IF THEY BELIEVE THAT DOING SO IS SOCIALLY EXPECTED OR ADVANTAGEOUS.

            Driving a manual transmission in traffic is no different.

            Think back to high school.

            The popular people put tremendous energy into researching and wearing the right clothes, choosing and listening to the right music, etc., because they believed that doing so would benefit them socially.

            If people – as a group – believed that driving a manual transmission in heavy traffic was socially expected, you’d see them demand it.

      • 0 avatar
        WheelMcCoy

        I’d bet that the statistics would show fewer accidents by MT drivers. Generally speaking, MT helps the driver stick the the business of driving, whereas an AT “allows” other activities. Raise your hand if you’ve read an account of unintended acceleration on a MT? I rest my case.

      • 0 avatar
        OneAlpha

        I keep thinking about those people who, after the crash, claim that they hit the brake pedal as hard as they could, but the car kept speeding up.

    • 0 avatar
      mister steve

      If only this were true.

      A cow-orker of mine in the early ‘90s drove a manual transmission econobox. I personally witnessed him talking on his (flip) phone and eating while driving and shifting.

      I truly feared for my life when I rode with him.

      • 0 avatar
        jfb43

        @jalop: I feel like you’re failing – or refusing – to recognize the nuance of my argument. Or are just being intentionally belligerent. But either way, I think you need to get that chip off your shoulder and comprehend what I’ve written.

        • 0 avatar
          jalop1991

          It absolutely *sounds* like you’re implying causation, and all I’m saying is that’s not the case.

          There will always be people who are interested in activity X for the sake of being interested in activity X, and there will always be people who have no interest in activity X.

          That people NEED to drive, doesn’t mean they’re going to exhibit any interest in it. The less they need to know and do, the better off they are–so they can get to what *does* interest them.

          Anyway, not everyone who drives an automatic is by definition one of what you describe. More and more people want cars that don’t come with manual transmissions any more; it sounds like you lump them into a big bucket with those passengers behind the wheel we all see every day, just because of that.

          And at some point VERY soon, there won’t be ANY manual transmissions to choose from. How will you then judge the people behind the wheel and their “level of involvement and attention”?

          Saying “tell me what transmission is in your car and I’ll tell you how interested, involved, and attentive you are” is akin to saying “tell me what color your skin is and I’ll tell you if you’re on welfare or not”.

          • 0 avatar
            jfb43

            I’ll lay out my thinking for you.

            Fact 1: fewer and fewer people today actually KNOW how to drive a manual.
            Fact 2: fewer and fewer vehicles come equipped with a manual

            Knowing these facts, someone who chooses to drive a new manual car LIKELY wants it because of the added driver involvement and enjoyment. It LIKELY means they like to drive and care about it, and that displays to me that they LIKELY take more pride with how the drive and do a better job at driving.

            None of that above paragraph is indisputable fact. It’s opinion based on what I’ve witnessed of modern car culture. People – younger people especially – don’t have the same interest in cars that past generations had. It’s just a commodity to them, rather than a means of pleasure. So when I see someone opt for more work, and more difficulty when it comes to driving, I tend to believe they care more and do better at it than the other guy who uses a car for basic transportation.

            Other factors that I would look at: the type of car and how well it is kept (maintenance, cleanliness, etc.). I think these would also contribute to my hypothesis.

          • 0 avatar
            jalop1991

            “I’ll lay out my thinking for you.

            Fact 1: fewer and fewer people today actually KNOW how to drive a manual.
            Fact 2: fewer and fewer vehicles come equipped with a manual

            Knowing these facts, someone who chooses to drive a new manual car LIKELY wants it because of the added driver involvement and enjoyment. It LIKELY means they like to drive and care about it, and that displays to me that they LIKELY take more pride with how the drive and do a better job at driving.

            None of that above paragraph is indisputable fact. ”

            I won’t dispute that.

            But you left it hanging there, implying that the reverse–“those who choose an automatic are not involved, do not enjoy driving, do not take pride in their driving, and do not do a better job at it”–

            –which is NOT true.

            it is NOT true that someone who chooses to drive an automatic does not want to be involved, does not enjoy driving. It is NOT true that they will not take more pride and do a better job at driving.

            Consider that many cars, and more every year, are not available with a manual transmission. Would you have drivers pass those by and choose something lesser or considerably different solely for the purpose of getting a row your own? Would you want a 911 buyer to walk right on by and get that Kia Soul instead?

            Consider that some people are in circumstances that demand an automatic transmission. That doesn’t make them any less involved, attentive, or capable.

            You have a very, VERY narrow view of life (not to mention a penchant for flawed reasoning).

  • avatar
    EAF

    I would have thought MT sales for Subaru would be well above the industry average. Too bad…

  • avatar
    Trucky McTruckface

    Meh. The manual option in most Subarus just masked how soul-suckingly boring and drab every other aspect of the vehicles has become since around the time they gave up on frameless door glass.

    CVTs are okay depending on the manufacturer and the application, but the thought of one in a WRX is pretty terrible. If the manual is going away, at least source one of the new 8-speeds from Toyota or something.

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      As a former driver of both a frameless 2007 and framed 2011 Impreza, I certainly approve of that statement. That’s definitely when Subaru lost their way. The 2007 was one of my favorite cars. Certainly favorite econobox. The 2011 was very disappointing.

  • avatar
    22_RE_Speedwagon

    well that just puts the FU in FUJI now doesn’t it?

    Yeah, I know they changed the name.

  • avatar
    Wizerud

    When I got my current vehicle I had a choice between a 6-speed manual and an 8-speed automatic. Having tried both, the automatic is simply a better transmission. Coming from a Miata, an RX8 and two Civic Si’s I demand an outstanding-feeling stick. I drove the stick version of my car (Clubman) and it just wasn’t that great. Merely above average. Not only that but the slushbox is faster. And more efficient.

    So I’m wondering, how many of you would still choose the stick version of your current car even if it wasn’t that enjoyable or clearly inferior to the auto? How bad would the manual have to be in order for you to go auto?

  • avatar
    Tele Vision

    Some people like making dinner. More people would rather order dinner at the same price and be done with it sooner – sans cleanup, too. There it is.

    • 0 avatar

      And some people would rather camp in Yosemite than stay there in a hotel, because at the end of the day the experience is better.

      There are much better cars for the money than a WRX if you’re not bothered about experiencing it. Buying an automatic WRX is a lot like buying a convertible Miata and never taking the roof down.

      • 0 avatar
        MBella

        Unfortunately that’s a good amount of the convertible driving population. It hurts me when it’s a perfect day outside, and I see someone in a convertible with the top up.

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          “I want to put the top down.”

          “What? No, Dwight. It’s fifty degrees outside. Don’t… please…”

          “But then no one can see us!”

          • 0 avatar
            mikey

            I have a fifty degree (10 C) top down rule. I bought my 05 Mustang in February, and still haven’t had the top down !

        • 0 avatar
          Trev Limiter

          I have an old Miata, but I only put the top down about once a month, either when autocrossing or exploring a mountain road. Every day is a perfect day in Southern California, which also makes it a perfect day to get sunburned. I wonder how many other top-up convertible drivers have the same concern.

          • 0 avatar
            WheelMcCoy

            That’s the wisdom old timers in convertibles offer. That is, drive with the top down in the early morning hours or at dusk. Keep the top up all other hours.

      • 0 avatar
        jalop1991

        “And some people would rather camp in Yosemite than stay there in a hotel, because at the end of the day they simply prefer that experience at that point in their lives.”

        There, fixed that for you.

  • avatar
    ThomasSchiffer

    I have been driving manual transmissions for decades and I do not and will not miss them. To me they never felt special nor did they enhance the driving experience. Maybe this is my point of view because manual transmissions were and still are very common in Europe, and most of us do not view them as special. Many European non-car enthusiasts can flawlessly operate a manual transmission. It is not a big deal and it does not make you a good driver. There are plenty of idiots on the road who can flawlessly drive a vehicle with a manual transmission, but they are still responsible for causing accidents and such.

    My beater city car Renault Twingo has a manual transmission. It is rubbery and the shift patterns are awful and long. It is not an engaging transmission, nor would I describe it as fun. When it is time to replace this car it will definitely be supplanted by something with an automatic transmission.

    I consider myself a car enthusiast, but there is more to a car than the type of transmission it has.

    • 0 avatar
      Tele Vision

      “I consider myself a car enthusiast, but there is more to a car than the type of transmission it has.”

      Wholeheartedly agree but, as I’m sure has been written myriad times, the act of driving a car is a perfect example of man and machine in an everyday setting. The interfaces are the pedals; the steering wheel; and the transmission. I’ve no doubt that my CTS-V would be quicker to 60 mph with an automatic transmission but that would be taking away a sizeable percentage of the interaction that I enjoy. I’m not trying to set records on the way to get a bottle of wine – I just want to have a fun and engaging drive. What should be worrisome for people who enjoy said interaction is that the manual is effectively dead in new vehicles. The fact that the automatic transmission has replaced it is nearly moot, as the steering wheel is next to go, along with the pedals. Leaving what? An autonomous pod that isn’t even as engaging as contemporary public transport – which is what our cars will one day be if the coders and tech companies get their way. Which they will. Yes, I’m hanging onto my manuals like grim death and, if that makes me a bit of a Luddite, I’m ok with that.

    • 0 avatar
      DC Bruce

      A fair point. Having been driving for 55 years and having learned on an International Harvester pickup truck with a “burnout proof” clutch, I think you are absolutely correct. There are (or were) countless execrable manual transmissions, and I have driven a good share of them: non-synchromesh “crash boxes,” awkward column shifters (in the 1950s Mercedes had a 4-speed column shifter), gimpy FWD shifters (especially of the “cable” variety) and gimpy rear-engine shifters (the VW Beetle was a notorious example). To be sure, the “snick-snick” of a manual transmission where the shifter is a 4-inch rod projecting up from the transmission directly beneath it can be a delight; and it’s even possible to have a well-executed FWD shifter or rear-engine shifter (Porsche).

      But, by the numbers, the vast majority of manuals I have driven I do not miss.

      Now, on a vehicle that purports to be a “driver’s car,” well that’s another matter. If I am buying the car for the drive — and not for transportation — then the manual is mandatory. But I’m 69 years old . . . so what I prefer doesn’t matter.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Thomas,
      Your Twingo is a cheap vehicle, so I would not expect a decent shift.

  • avatar
    ttacgreg

    MT just inherently engage me when driving. I love the extra control it allows me to have. It is a dance with the car, the motor’s torque and HP peaks, the throttle opening, the sounds made while I do so, the road I am on, the mental calculations, the idiosyncrasies of the particular MT I am driving. I am an enthusiastic and engaged driver, and as such an MT greatly enhances the experience.

    • 0 avatar
      OneAlpha

      And that’s the point.

      It’s not about shift speeds or seamless power delivery – it’s about the experience.

      It’s why some people cook their own meals, do their own landscaping or build their own computers – because they want to be a crucial part of the operation, not just a hanger-on or a passenger.

  • avatar
    jacob_coulter

    Much of this is EPA red tape. It’s not worth the extra fees to get a MT powertrain certified, so automakers are just no longer fooling with importing manuals in the US as they are such a small percentage of buyers anyway.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Yeah for some time the manual trans configuration probably cost the automaker more total money to build as the cost of developing and testing its unique calibration was amortized over so few units.

    • 0 avatar
      jalop1991

      The manual transmission and the sedan are going down parallel paths. It’s not what people want, so manufacturers aren’t building them.

  • avatar
    Steve Biro

    Given that I am not a wealthy man, my next vehicle is likely to be either a Toyota Corolla hatch or Hyundai Elantra GT – either with manual transmission. Which one will depend on whether I can get it equipped without driver assistance technology. If the answer is no in both cases, perhaps a current-gen Nissan Frontier will do. I miss my old Ranger with manual tranny, standard engine, standard cab and 2WD.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    There is one significant fact that has impacted the popularisation of automatic transmissions. That is the move from RWD to FWD.

    In a rear wheel drive the shifter essentially goes from the gear lever into the gearbox.

    I do recall column shift manuals and the shift was cumbersome due to the linkages etc.

    Another part of US vehicle culture I don’t understand is the prefernce for column shift. In Australia floor shift is the preferred option whether auto or manual.

    Even in Australia we have a high proportion of auto gearboxes sold, but this is slowly dwindling.

    Automatic and CVT is the future whether we like it or not, manual transmissions will be left to some performance and budget work vehicles.

  • avatar
    OneAlpha

    To my mind, there’s only one answer.

    If I can’t BUY one, I’ll BUILD one.

    Difficult? Maybe.

    But as a college professor once told me, “The hardest part of any project is WANTING TO DO IT.”

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    Short sighted and will hurt the brand’s performance reputation. I’ll keep buying cars that offer a manual. I don’t care if it’s a Kia.

  • avatar
    focal

    I own two very good cars in manual. A 328i RWD and a Cayman GT4. I have eyes set on a VW if and when the 328i dies or gets too expensive to maintain. I see VW as one of the last manual hold outs. The Cayman will live in my house until I’m in the ground. I will trailer it to a track when self driving is banned.

    Just enjoy what you want to drive and enjoy the manual while you can. My partner keeps pestering me to get an auto so she can drive it. Instead of spending thousands on a new car that depreciates, spend less and learn to drive three pedals is my usual answer.

  • avatar
    raisingAnarchy

    “…the turbocharged WRX soldiers on for 2018, patiently waiting for an update and platform swap.”

    And it should continue to be patient. The platform has only had 3 model years so far. 2020 should be the earliest possible expectation for an update, because we’re talking about Subaru, not BMW. Just about any and every Japanese car company throughout history has kept a 5+ year update cycle, with light refreshes mid-term. Not sure why the WRX NEEDS a thorough revision every 2nd year.

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