By on April 5, 2018

2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio - Image: FCA

Alfa Romeo fans, whose passion was hardly diminished by reports of early Giulia reliability issues, will probably be pleased to hear there may be fewer doors and more power coming to the Italian sports model. We’ve heard rumors of a two-door before, but this one adds some extra detail.

According to Autocar, the upcoming Giulia variant adopts more than just a coupe bodystyle. Quicker launches and top-end speed bursts will come by way of a energy recovery system that adds extra muscle to the existing 2.0-liter four-cylinder and 2.9-liter V6.

The publication’s sources claim Alfa has two powertrains under development. When fitted with the ERS system — possibly a development of the HY-KERS system Ferrari and Fiat Chrysler-owned parts supplier Magneti Marelli used in the LaFerrari — the 2.0- and 2.9-liter engines will gain additional electric thrust for high-load driving situations.

Output is claimed to be 345 brake horsepower for the smaller mill and 641 bhp for the six-cylinder. An ERS system, like that used in Formula One, harvests and stores kinetic energy from braking as electrical energy. A driver can then use the stored energy to aid the internal combustion engine via a motor-generator. Basically, a mild hybrid that aims for speed, not economy.

If the Giulia Coupe is truly a go, we’ll learn of it officially in the brand’s upcoming product plan, expected later this year. Unfortunately, because the word “coupe” means many things in 2018, Autocar’s sources couldn’t confirm the model will actually have two doors. We may be looking at another swoopy four-door liftback sort of thing.

Even if this ends up being the case, a Giulia “coupe” would still give Alfa the product — and muscle — to better challenge the likes of BMW’s M division and Mercedes-AMG. The model supposedly goes on sale next year.

In the U.S., Giulia sales hit a new high point in March, with 1,284 buyers taking home the Italian sedan. The newcomer Stelvio SUV saw 1,270 buyers.

[Image: Fiat Chrysler]

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41 Comments on “Alfa Romeo Giulia Coupe on the Way, Expect Added Power: Report...”


  • avatar
    IBx1

    Don’t care, need stick.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Where’s the mid-level 7000RPM naturally-aspirated V6 with a chrome intake?

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    If it is a real coupe this may be the one

  • avatar
    ScarecrowRepair

    I find this whole genre of cars baffling. I drove an 86 MR2 for 29 years and never got tired of shifting at redline, until the engine died at 473K miles (and Toyota wouldn’t give me my money back for being defective, the rascals!). 116 hp, 96 torques, fine with me. I understand people who want more power. I understand why a manual makes it so much more fun. All of that is the point for buying such an impractical car instead of a sensible hatchback or useful pickup.

    So hwy make such impractical unuseful cars, know rightly as *sports* cars, also aka toys, with practical trannies that take the fun out of them? Why four doors and back seats which add to the cost — just for the illusion of being practical?

    On the other hand, I don’t understand the visceral reaction against pure electric cars. I’d love to lose water pumps, oil pumps, radiators, all the rest of that crap that breaks and means downtime from driving the car and adds expense. As much as I love shifting at redline, much of that love is because auto trannies are dumb as f*ck, always shifting at the wrong time, too quick to upshift and needing too much hint to downshift. An electric motor would eliminate all that and let me concentrate on the go and slow pedals. getting a perfect shift with foot and hand working together is an awesome party trick with only me for an audience; paddles only go up or down once gear at a time, and a good2- shift makes me smile more than any assisted shifter ever could. But I’d also love to do away with gears altogether in an electric drive.

    Sorry for the rant. It really has nothing to do with this particular story.

    • 0 avatar
      Astigmatism

      Not sure I see your point about “the illusion of being practical.” I have this specific car (obviously as a sedan), and those rear doors and back seats make it _actually_ practical, while diminishing the enjoyment I get out of driving it not at all. I wouldn’t buy a two-seater because I need to be able to transport friends, dogs and in-laws in the back seat, but that doesn’t mean I want to drive something boring.

      As for the transmission, I hate that we live in a world where it’s not profitable for automakers to build manuals for the 5% of buyers who’d order them, but as someone who sits in 30 minutes of stop-and-go traffic every morning, I probably wouldn’t have taken the stick even if it had been offered.

      • 0 avatar
        brawnychicken333

        I have similar thoughts on the manual. The S4 I just acquired was only available with an auto. It would be awesome with a stick. I probably wouldn’t have bought it that way. For me, the stick is just not worth it for the 5-10% of the time it will be more fun. Now if it was strictly a toy car? That’s a different story.

      • 0 avatar
        ScarecrowRepair

        What I mean is you pay extra to give the illusion pf practicality. If you actually wanted practical, you’d by a CamCord. Instead you not only pay extra for that illusion, but reduce the fun of the car at the same time.

        • 0 avatar
          Astigmatism

          Um, no, I’m pretty sure that my car is actually a good deal more practical than a two-seater would be, unless you think that my friends, in-laws and dog would all ride in the trunk. The contrast with the CamCord is precisely the point: I want a car that I can use to carry things other than just myself and a single passenger, but I don’t want it to be boring. Not sure what your disconnect is on this.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        This is the reality. I think a lot of “save the manuals” folks are not willing to admit what driving generally is like for the bulk of the population. Or that the objective downsides of automatics have pretty much disappeared, if not reversed.

        My car’s auto is far from the best, but the power and gearing make up for a lot, and over time I’ve learned how to get the most of it. And again it’s miles better than the slurry 4 speeds of the 90s. Contrarianism without logic or purpose is just madness, and I think that is what drives a lot of the resistance to changes in the auto market.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      I don’t know if you’ve ever actually driven an electric car, but everything you’ve said about them is true. Even the low-end ones are a hoot. It’s the other stuff about them ($$$) that gives pause.

      • 0 avatar
        ScarecrowRepair

        I know how expensive they are. I had hoped battery prices would drop low enough that by the time the MR2 expired, I could convert it to electric for much less than buying a new car.

  • avatar
    Astigmatism

    Because what the Giulia needs, with Alfa’s reputation for bulletproof reliability, is to introduce more complex interactions between the engine and the car’s electrical systems. Hm…

  • avatar
    Acd

    Congrats to Alfa for their best sales month ever in the U.S. in March—Alfa even outsold Genesis.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    A real Alfa coupe ought to be called GTV. I could also see them building a 4 door sport hatch akin to the BMW 4 series Gran Coupe and the Audi A5 sportback.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    The KERS system would be a welcome upgrade.

    I test drove the 2.0 in the Stelvio, and even though it had a decent 0-60 time, it still had quite an annoying delay off the line.

  • avatar
    Truckducken

    KERS for the masses! OK, this price point isn’t exactly for mass consumption, but I hope to see this tech start to work its way into everyday cars. Done right, you’re getting much of the energy recovery benefit of a hybrid, plus the ability to put more twist to the wheels faster than a typical hybrid system. And you don’t have to haul half a ton of batteries around.

    • 0 avatar
      Truckducken

      Oops! The MM system uses a Li battery for storage, rather than mechanical or supercapacitor technology. Still, if the battery system is optimized for quick discharge, you can get most of the above advantages as long as the battery pack is reasonably lightweight.

  • avatar
    mrentropy

    When they come out with this, they can hand the chassis over to Dodge/SRT, design a Challenger inspired body, and make a new Barracuda that can compete with the Mustangs and Camaros.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    345 horsepower from a 2.0 is quite a bit higher than I would feel comfortable spending my own money on. This (and all Alfas) make perfect sense as leases as long as you live near a dealer. But the minute you want it to be mine beyond the warranty I get cold feet.

    I’m still considering replacing my GS with a Giulia Ti Sport once the lease is up. But if the coupe is actually a coupe in the literal sense, I’m going to have to see about waiting for it. Though I suspect the price of entry with KERS will put it out of my ball field.

    • 0 avatar
      Astigmatism

      I felt the same way, but the lease terms I saw on the Giulia were atrocious and I couldn’t justify flushing $20k down the toilet over three years with nothing to show for it at the end. I ended up buying an extended factory warranty (7 years/100k miles), and figure that will cover me for as long as I end up owning the car.

      • 0 avatar
        PasadenaYellow

        How has the Giulia been for you so far? Both driving and reliability wise?

        • 0 avatar
          IHateCars

          I’m interested to hear Astigmatism’s impressions as well because I would love a Quadrifoglio, it’s one of the few cars that really excites me….but the potential (and legendary) Alfa QC/reliability issues kinda scare me off…

        • 0 avatar
          Astigmatism

          Driving-wise, it’s been the best car I’ve ever owned, bar none. The steering feel is incredible, the ride is surprisingly good on the 18-inch wheels (I initially wanted the Ti Sport based on looks, but ended up getting the Ti Lusso instead because the 19s were too much for me), and the engine is super-responsive in the normal “N” and dynamic “D” modes; I literally start looking forward to my commute home several hours before the end of work every day. Oh, and the interior (crema leather with wood in mine) is gorgeous for the price.

          Reliability-wise, well, as I said below, hm. I’m about 2k miles in, and at 1200 miles I got a warning light saying my automatic transmission had failed. It turned out to be a sensor problem rather than a transmission problem, caused by the battery putting out inconsistent voltage; they replaced the battery and I haven’t had the problem recur. But yeah, on a brand new car a month in, it was pretty upsetting.

          If it turns out that was a one-time thing, this will be the best buying decision I ever made. If it’s indicative of the next seven years, it’ll be the worst. Stay tuned for updates.

          • 0 avatar
            Chris FOM

            Keep us updated. I’ll probably be in the market for a new car next year and my heart keeps trying to talk the rest of me into a Giulia Quad, but the reliability concerns are a major hurdle to get past. Even an extended warranty only helps with financial costs, not the time lost to having it at the dealer. Also what year is yours? The AR fan forums are desperately trying to claim that all the huge major reliability bugs that got so widely reported were sorted out for the 2018 model year, but I’m not at all sure I believe them.

          • 0 avatar
            Astigmatism

            Mine’s a 2018; November 2017 build date. At least I get Alfa loaners.

            I don’t know whether the Quads and the Giulias are entirely equivalent in reliability (they may be, but there are a lot of differences between their systems), but ping me some point down the line if you want to check up on how I’m doing.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      I have a Ti Sport Q4 with the dynamics package in rosso tri-coat. It has most of the looks of the quadrifoglio, it’s a stunner. Random people ask about it all the time.

      I’ve had it for about 6,000km with no issues. Like Astigmatism said, the driving dynamics are great. The handling is just phenomenal. It’s a ton of fun if you have some twisty roads to unwind and a pretty comfortable and reasonably quiet highway cruiser.

      Speaking of practicality, I took it on a road trip with the family over the Easter weekend and it turns out that it’s actually reasonable to live with as a family car. It tracked through snowy mountain passes with no issues at all. The trunk is big enough to fit a few days worth of stuff for two kids, my wife and I. We picked my brother up along the way and rode 5 of us another hundred km in relative comfort. It’s not big inside, but let’s call it European comfortable.

  • avatar
    NN

    my midlife crisis is coming in two years. I’ll need a stick shift Alfa then, if one exists.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    A Giulia coupe? TEMPTING! But unfortunately, I need a small pickup more than I want a coupe. Rats!

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Bad news guys, not only is Vulpine turning his nose up at $50k German coupes, this Alfa is also a no-go. Back to the drawing board (consider adding a bed next time)!

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    And to think that FCA could have just used this money on a good midsize and large CUV and sedan for Chrysler. Instead we get these things.

  • avatar
    SilverCoupe

    This could be a contender when I go to replace my 08 Audi A5 with an S5 in a few years, though I too would be unhappy at having to replace my manual with an automatic.

    I took my ten year old Audi in for its annual service this week. After ten years, I had to replace the battery; no other issues. Oh, the unreliability of Audis! Whether an Alfa could match this would be something to be taken into consideration.

    • 0 avatar
      MoparRocker74

      Nice choice! Those 5 series Audis stopped me in my tracks when I first saw one in ’06 or so, and its still one of the best looking cars out there now. To my eye, its the German equivalent of the Challenger, Mustang, or Camaro…and with the V8 it fits in nicely.

  • avatar
    MoparRocker74

    Hey Alfa: Just a friendly reminder that ‘coupe’ means TWO (2) doors! Ill accept 2 openings with a long/short clamshell setup like the RX-8 also. But coupe does NOT mean a low roof, raked backlight and 4 forward swinging doors with 4 exposed door handles….that’s a SEDAN, which is almost never as attractive as the 2 door counterpart. KTHX.

  • avatar
    Bazza

    If indeed a true “coupe”, that means two less doors falling off their hinges at ~50K miles. Sounds good.

  • avatar
    Tstag

    I admire what FCA are doing with Alfa but let’s be honest their sales numbers globally still suck.

    That’s not to say Alfa can’t succeed but I can’t help but wonder if a company like Jaguar might be a better custodian for the brand simply because they could share so many components. This sector of the market is in serious decline. So unless Alfa can reduce its costs then they will take a spanking.

  • avatar
    hpycamper

    2 doors is good.
    2 door hardtop is better.
    2 door convertible is best.

    Also, 2 doors does not necessarily equal 2 seats.

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