By on February 17, 2018

tesla model 3

Despite the fandom surrounding all things Elon Musk, there are still some electric car shoppers who’d rather drive than wait. It also seems that, when weighing a prospective Tesla Model 3 purchase, some consumers are willing to let price sway them to another car with a similar driving range.

None of this should come as a shock to those not immersed in blogs and forums devoted to championing Tesla as the sole agent of change in the automotive sphere, and the only “pure” solution to Earth’s problems. To some true believers, however, these shoppers could be seen as traitors to the cause.

That’s their problem. For General Motors, Tesla’s loss of customers is the legacy automaker’s gain.

As we’ve told you before, assembly line issues forced two walkbacks of the company’s Model 3 production target. Originally forecasted to hit 5,000 vehicles per week by the end of 2017, Tesla now says its Fremont factory will reach that number by the end of June 2018. That’s led to a pushback in delivery dates for reservation holders.

The Model 3 comes in two flavors: a base, $35,000 sedan with a 220-mile range, and a $44,000 Long Range model. In the interest of income, the pricier model got first dibs on the company’s slow-to-ramp-up production line. Earlier this month, Tesla informed those who put $1,000 down on a base Model 3 on the first day of reservations (March 2016) that their delivery date was being pushed back to the end of 2018. Some who reserved the following day were told their delivery date will be in early 2019, Bloomberg reports.

For those buyers, and especially those who reserved a Model 3 well after the launch, there’s another problem. While waiting months and years for a new vehicle is annoying, the thought of paying extra once it does arrive is even more of an incentive to shop elsewhere. Some reservation holders worry the federal EV tax credit will dry up before that new car shows up at their door.

At Tesla’s projected production rate, the automaker is expected to use up its share of $7,500 tax credits before the end of the year. After that date, the incentive shrinks by half for the next six months, then again, before disappearing entirely. That means a base Model 3 could rise in price by $3,750 or more by the time it’s delivered. Buyers might find themselves on the hook for the whole $35,000.

According to Reuters, the recent pushback in delivery dates is compelling some reservation holders to look at a 238-mile Chevrolet Bolt instead. The news agency reports GM dealers in EV-friendly California have seen an increase in interest from Tesla shoppers. Many would-be buyers have also expressed their intentions online.

“We’re getting the Tesla people who wanted their Model 3,” said Yev Kaplinskiy, a GM dealer located in that sweet spot between San Francisco and Silicon Valley. “We ask them, ‘What other cars are you interested in?’ They’re mostly Tesla. But they want the car now. They don’t want to wait.”

One TeslaMotorsClub.com forum poster, who claimed to be an early reservation holder, bemoaned the lengthy wait after receiving notice of the delay. “My objective…was always a $35,000 Tesla for the price of a decently optioned Civic (with full federal tax credit),” wrote poster 206er.

GM sold 23,297 Bolts in 2017, with the model becoming available nationwide last summer. While a base Bolt starts at $37,495, they’re readily available, and GM won’t hit its tax credit production limit until well after Tesla, ensuring current buyers the full $7,500 incentive.

Sure, many die-hard Tesla fans will wait however long it takes to get their hands on a Model 3. For others, though, brand loyalty has a limit.

In a survey of 1,058 car shoppers conducted by Autolist, 37 percent of respondents said they would look elsewhere for a car after waiting for a period of 12 to 18 months for a Model 3. (That’s the time frame Tesla cites after a Model 3 deposit). Another 34.4 percent said they would tolerate a delay of three to six months after the 18-month period before cancelling their reservation and asking for a refund.

[Image: Tesla]

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81 Comments on “Shockingly, Some Would-be Model 3 Buyers Would Rather Drive a Non-Tesla EV That’s Available Now...”


  • avatar
    highdesertcat

    If you can’t be with the one you love, love the one you’re with.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I’d actually be interested in trying out a Bolt, just to see how it drives.

    • 0 avatar
      Thinkin...

      The Bolt drives quite well actually – the drive and the range are its party tricks. The rest gets ugly quickly: The interior feels pretty low-rent, options are packaged strangely (no Nav at any price? Only Onstar or Carplay/Android…) and the seats are less than ideal – the front seats are small and not very comfortable (also, no power/memory), and the rear seats are tighter than they should be.

      As an “affordable long range EV” the Bolt is great, but as a “$40,000 car” it is pretty bad.

      And then there’s the exterior design… And the GM dealer experience.

      • 0 avatar

        Exactly. I test drove a Bolt, and I couldn’t see doing a 200 mile day in it…the seats sucked, and the interior was a $17,000 car, not a $40k car. A worthy electric, but not a luxury car. They spent the money on the batteries….

        • 0 avatar
          geozinger

          @thinkin: It seems odd to me to criticize the Volt for being a platform with a huge battery. That’s what the car is, they spent all of the engineering time and money on that. I thoroughly understand not wanting to drive a car with bad seats (or at least seats that don’t fit you well), but complaining about not having Navigation? FWIW, that would be the last piece of technology I would want in a car. My phone does a great job of providing maps and navigation. I’d be highly disappointed if the car didn’t come with AP & AA, like some other makes of cars that don’t offer them.

          @speedlaw: Yup, for my $40K electric car, I want them to spend the money on the batteries. I want that extremely dependable and sorted out. I can live with “meh” furnishings and such. But I want the drive and propulsion units bulletproof. That’s worth 40K…

          • 0 avatar
            el scotto

            @geoziner,Sir how often does your Volt need to go see Mr. Goodwrench? From what I understand, no ICE means no oil changes and an electric car is much easier on brake pads rotors. Lower maintenance could be a factor for some people. Dad is a retired USMC fighter pilot/aeronautical engineer who rues the fact that he can’t get an Eldorado or a Bonneville with biggest gosh darn engine they could put in it. These days he drives a Suburban LTZ and electric golf cart. His electric ride gets morre miles.

          • 0 avatar
            Thinkin...

            @geozinger: We’re on the same page. I could care less about Nav in a car… BUT – to not offer it seems crazy. It’s a cash cow option that is pure profit, with a high take rate. It’s like a restaurant not offering drinks; they’re the most profitable and easiest to store and serve.

            And the packaging and exterior design: the problem isn’t that GM put all its resources into the battery and drivetrain, as that would have been understandable. The issue is that they were so afraid of cannibalizing their own CUV sales, that they packaged the Bolt as a 90s foreign compact hatch. It’s not even particularly aerodynamic…. Imagine if they’d packaged it like the Kia Niro; SUV-ish, with the same coefficient of drag… they wouldn’t be able to build them fast enough. But instead, it’s packaged like a bloated Leaf; only desirable for its battery.

          • 0 avatar
            geozinger

            @Thinkin: I follow you now. I don’t know the reasoning behind not offering Nav, but I suspect it may be all of the cost involved with it and probably a pretty low take rate. It seems to me recent GM methodology has become ruthless in the cutting of costs.

            I don’t know if I agree entirely about them being worried about cannibalizing S/CUV sales. In the current sales environment, I’m betting they wished they’d made the Bolt larger than it is. For example, if a value shopper (like me) were interested in a S/CUV, the list price of a Bolt-ed Equinox would scare me away. But the LT trim level with the 1.5T and etc. would probably be more to my liking and the price I’d be willing to pay. Cheap-os like me have a very strict boundary on how much money will be spent on new cars. Even though a conventional Equinox may not be as eco friendly and trouble free as a Bolt may be, it’s still going to be better in all aspects than whatever I’m replacing.

            As for the size of the car, I wonder if that’s due to other markets and what people are willing to drive. It may seem tiny here in the US, but it’s probably normal-sized in Italy, Japan or Chile. When I finally got to sit in a Bolt, I thought it similar to the Pontiac Vibe. I thought that size of car would be great for a young couple or a single person.

      • 0 avatar

        @Thinkin.

        Yeah those front seats in the Bolt give me cause to pause. WIth my low back problems I have to have a comfortable car. To hear young fit drivers complain about the seats being too narrow keeps me off the dealers lot.

        While the Model 3 is still the best car for the money IMHO, its unavailability is an issue if you actually need a car to replace a crashed or unreliable one. Thankfully my LEAF is still going strong and I can wait a while longer, but it is no longer certain I’ll get a model 3. There are several factors in play.

        Yes the delay is annoying and makes you weigh up your options. I will wait until Tesla hit the 200,000 vehicles delivered in the US and we will know with certainty when the tax credit will be reduced to $3,750. The choice then will be buy the more expensive first production at $49,000 or maybe wait for say the AWD, we should know the price of that by then.

        The promise of full autonomy for buyers of the model 3 is uncertain. Tesla have indicated that to make full autonomy possible the compute unit will change from NVidea to a Tesla spec’d unit and that upgrades to that will only be guaranteed to buyers who buy both advanced autopilot and full self driving options when the car is brand new. There is no guarantee that full autonomy will be offered as an option to existing model 3 cars at any price down the pike. To buy both of those options now is another $8,000. I really want to be able to buy into full autonomy when it’s available, I have advanced Glaucoma and may actually need it in a couple of years. If there’s a chance the car I buy this year may not be able to do full autonomy at any price, then why buy it now? I’d like to lease given this uncertainty, but that’s not an option either right now. A $57,000 first production Tesla will buy a lifetime of Uber rides if independance from the threat of legal blindness is my goal.

        As a non Tesla customer my wait may be long. A work colleague got invited to configure their model 3 this week. They reserved just 2 months ago. As a an existing Tesla owner they get to jump line. As a before reveal reservationist it is frustrating to see the promise slip further and further into the future. This psychological trigger added to the uncertainty surrounding full self driving and the fed tax credit I find the the allure is fading fast.

        • 0 avatar
          civicjohn

          JP, I have amblyopia (“lazy eye”), I feel your pain.

          I have commented on this thread, not a fan of the Tfanboys, and I can’t for the life of me understand why anyone would drop the coins for level 5 autonomy. We’re a long way from that.

          But I have no worries for NVidia, they are selling every chip they can make to mine crypto currency.

      • 0 avatar
        bunkie

        Personally, I’m happy to see nav systems go. I never the use the one in my car, Waze does a better job and is upgraded regularly, something that costs $149 (just for current data, no software update) for the in-dash nav system.

        The problem is that it is included in option packages that only offer other “must-have” options. So it tends to inflate the car price.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “I’d actually be interested in trying out a Bolt, just to see how it drives.”

      Best part of an EV is how it drives. Blows the doors off any ICE vehicle. Dead quiet, buttery smooth, effortless torque. That’s what I love the most about my Volt is driving it. The efficiency is just icing on the cake.

    • 0 avatar
      dividebytube

      I only sat in one at the local auto show. The interior was very spartan, though I did like the theater style seating in the back. It didn’t look or feel very comfortable for long hauls but it would work for city driving.

  • avatar
    01 Deville

    I saw the snarky headline about tesla and without reading the text, here is my rather productive comment to TTAC about Tesla

    SHUT UP AND GET F’D

  • avatar
    Sub-600

    It looks like the bloom may be coming off the rose but Musk’s fanbois are legion. I haven’t seen such blind faith since Jonestown.

    • 0 avatar
      slap

      Apple product releases – or at least they used to.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      The Musk Show is impressive, but still just amateur hour compared to Hope and Change, and Make the Berlin Wall Great Again. Not to mention the greatest shows of all, Tanks in The Streets and The System Will Collapse.

    • 0 avatar
      bryanska

      I get why. Nobody else is actually doing anything inspiring or moving the needle. The Left and the Right are insufferable. Everyone gets along during exploding periods of great prosperity, and nothing does that like waves of new tech. Musk is the only person loading the pipeline for future stuff. Trump wants time travel and the Left wants impossible levels of compassion. Musk wants space travel, hyper loop, electric cars, and electric homes. Who can’t agree on stuff like that?

      • 0 avatar
        geozinger

        @bryanska: I really don’t consider myself a Elon Musk fan, but I do admire his ambition. No one person in recent times has managed to unite my brother and I (we have opposite opinions on many things) like SpaceX, Tesla and the Boring Company.

        That alone is a worthy feat…

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    I’m really starting to think all these Tesla articles are really just troll bait. I mean, sure, I guess Elon Musk could have called Steph’s first born child ugly or that his dog was run over by a Model X. But the timing of the articles always seems juuust right.

    I don’t know why I feel compelled to comment on things I really have indifference to, but I guess that’s the sign of good journalism today.

    “None of this should come as a shock to those not immersed in blogs and forums devoted to championing Tesla as the sole agent of change in the automotive sphere”

    Would the Bolt exist if it weren’t for Tesla? Would the Leaf have made it to a second generation without the interest in electric cars which was normalized by the existence of Tesla? Would regular manufacturers be making electric cars that aren’t hilariously ugly if there weren’t real competition that looked good?

    Also, the releases of Model S and X both were substantially delayed. People still bought/are buying them.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      Yes the Bolt would exist. Chevy started with the It many years ago and the Bolt was the next logical step. Tesla are not the only company with smart people.

    • 0 avatar
      WheelMcCoy

      I had a similar reaction. Most green blogs I read are happy about other entries besides Tesla. The more the merrier as it justifies the demand for EVs. Tesla is just an easy and popular target, especially here.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        I’ve read actual reviews on the 3 elsewhere. They have positive things to say and have found some legitimate issues. “Truth” about a car involves bringing up both positive and negative aspects. Here, not only are the positive points ignored, they make no mention of genuine issues.

        So people are getting tired of waiting for a car that’s been delayed. Like that’s a surprise. I want a Porsche Mission E and I’m not sure if I want a car from the first year of production. So, I might get something else while waiting. Big deal. I’m still probably going to buy the Porsche eventually. This happens all the time with a lot of products.

    • 0 avatar
      civicjohn

      Yes, the Bolt would exist regardless of you or Tesla, no matter how self-important you may be.

      If you are a troll, you bit.

      Yes, the Tesla is the only reason the car business exists, other than that pesky profit thing.

      Guess you missed the last posts of your fanboys site. Tesla has no desire to move past the 2170 cells for the S/X, and if you had read the last shareholder letter, you should know Elon and company aren’t moving those cars to the current batteries, they have an existing contract they need to fulfill. I know, “that’s just CRAZY “!

      You missed the last talking points memo. Actually, most buyers ARE looking for a new S/ X. Last I checked, they are 6 years old.

      • 0 avatar
        Land Ark

        So who’s worse? The reality-blind Tesla fanboys or the anti-Tesla folks who are frothing at the mouth to shout down anyone who disagrees with their pessimism?

      • 0 avatar
        bryanska

        So help me on this. How is the Bolt not driven by Tesla nipping at its heels? Passion for the Tesla brand is at levels envied by any established company in any category. Know why Yoplait made Greek yogurt that failed but still poured hundreds of millions into it? Chobani. Why Android exists? Apple. Chevy may have been working on the Bolt, but without Tesla there’s no way it would have launched when it did (with gas prices at rock bottom) and is packaged how it is (with a very specific range and size target). Without Telsa, nobody would be launching full electrics with 2017 gas prices.

        Tesla is driving the market not because they’re any good or they’re selling, but because Tesla is the first player to create the future. The market would have waited until more $100/barrel oil otherwise. Elon Musk is irrationally acting early but if he pulls it off he’ll be WELL positioned. This is business physics 101; if you see a wave coming and can ride the bleeding edge without going under, a new market will carry you.

        • 0 avatar
          grinchsmate

          Yes GM is driven by Tesla, just as Tesla is driven by GM. Apple is driven by android, in the sense that they look at what android did three years ago and copy it.

          None of these things happen in isolation. If you look at history there is seldom one visionary but rather an industrial consensus that things are headed in a certain direction with everyone acting in concert. Someone always gets there first but it is a failure on the public’s part when we anoint them “king of this new thing” rather than just “first to get the numbers to line up”. Or more common these days “verily he has a big stack of cash”, think Prius.

          Also its funny to hear about Greek yogurt like its a new thing, like a couple years back when avocado was a new trend, or when espresso was suddenly all that.

    • 0 avatar

      Would the Bolt exist were it not for Tesla? I’m sure a persuasive argument can be made that the impending Model 3 was a benchmark for GM but GM’s battery electrics are an offshoot of the Volt program (which itself sprang out of GM’s Dual Mode Hybrid project), which was a response to Toyota and the Prius, not Tesla. Would the Tesla Model S exist had GM not megahyped the Volt project? Could William Tecumseh Sherman defeat Rommel in battle? We’re talking alternate history hypotheticals.

      In terms of chronology, the Tesla Model S was introduced in 2012. GM opened it’s new battery R&D facility at the Warren Tech Center in 2009 and then doubled its size a year later. Before the Model S came out, and its embrace by luxury car buyers, did anyone really consider Tesla to be a serious automaker? The Roadster was an electric Lotus.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    There’s no satisfaction on earth like rolling down the window of your Model 3, pointing your Boring Company flamethrower at a coal rolling pickup, and turning it into a heap of molten scrap.

  • avatar
    turbo_awd

    I’ve actually seen a few Model 3s rolling around here (I live in Alameda County, where the factory is). I also put down a deposit (online) on day 1. Just for lulz, and maybe a 25% interest.

    As I’ve learned now:
    1) it’s gonna be a long, long time…
    2) no even-near ludicrous mode on model 3 (5.6 0-60 is basically what my ’05 LGT did, give or take). That model is $44k, I believe.
    3) really not sure about “1 screen to rule them all” styling. It makes me feel like its primary goal is to reduce driver involvement, not aid me in driving. I’ve waited a long time to have $$ to buy a fun car. Feeling more and more like this ain’t it. If it had the UI of the Model S + similar power, I’d be MUCH more interested. This one is clearly the “you ain’t rich enough for our real cars” stripper model. Almost feels like we got trolled..

    I.e. pretty sure I’m going to ask for a refund sometime in the not too distant future when I find a car I like better.

    • 0 avatar
      Tele Vision

      There must be fleets of used 911s and Corvettes within 50 miles of your house. That’s the way I’d go – and be driving it tomorrow. Oh, and mileage DOES NOT MATTER in a ‘fun car’, by the way. It just doesn’t.

    • 0 avatar
      healthy skeptic

      @turbo_awd

      Before you ask for your deposit back, just FYI…the dual-motor version will almost certainly be faster. (I’m guessing sub-4.0 0-60). And one thing all of the reviews have ben consistently positive about is the handling. I had been worried about this one myself, because I ain’t buying the car if it’s not a fun driver’s car.

      Of course, I’m sure the dual-motor version will also be more $$$. But that’s the only version I’ll consider buying. In a way, this delay has been good for me because it lets me kick the decision further down the road.

      BTW, I live in Oakland, and at this point I can still count the number of Model 3s I’ve seen in the wild on the fingers of one hand. That’s counting two in the body shop that specializes in Teslas.

  • avatar
    dont.fit.in.cars

    No concern here standing before the alter of ICE and worship the gods of payload. No redemption with the religion of EV.

  • avatar
    arthurk45

    People credit Tesla with the popularity (such as it is) of electric cars. But GM was building electric cars before Elon Musk could eat solid food, and the Chevy Volt was the first practical electrically propelled vehicle, not Tesla, which still has failed completely to produce an affordable electric car, despite Musk’d loudmouthed claims that this was his goal in life. Looking at everything Musk has been doing, making money for himself is his life’s goal. If li ion batteries were still priced what they were 5 tyears ago, Musk and a few co-workers would still be taking Lotus chassis and stuffing an electric motor and a battery pack into them, caling them electric roadsters. The actual number of folks willing to buy the Model 3 has not been increasing over the past month or so and now seems to be shrinking somewhat as the more rational look to buy something that at least is closer to affordability (with the govt welfare tax credit). Wait till more of these relatively few Tesla fans (1% of the auto market) actually realize that Tesla’s reputation for long driving ranges and fats recharges and a network of fast chargers is about to be ripped to shreds by CCS charging stations everywhere and twice as fast as Tesla Superchargers and used by cars , like the Chevy Bolt,,which have greater driving ranges than Teslas costing twice as much. Tesla’s outrageously pricey maintenance and proprietary repair and body work is another good economic reason to avoid this company. I consider Tesla a comapnytht has no qualms about lying and providing misleading claims. I don’t see them still around 7 years from now. Then try to get one of their cars repaired. Good luck.

    • 0 avatar
      brandloyalty

      My impression was that Musk wanted to popularize electric cars. Not to make piles of money running big factories. He already has gobs of money. And he has moved electric car awaress along quite effectively. Just because fossil fuel interests impair this change does not diminish the validity of Musk’s message and efforts.

    • 0 avatar
      brandloyalty

      Once again, where is ttac’s “Tesla Death Watch”? Put up or shut up, please.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        brandloyalty,
        There is plenty of evidence in the data regarding the numbers of Chevy Bolts being sold to disaffected Tesla 3 customers.

        Musk might have started out with great intentions, he’s a great marketing salesman for his ideas. But, he just doesn’t know how to run an industrial business.

        Producing software and manufacturing are different, like manufacturing to agriculture. There are transferrable concepts, but when you get down to the nuts and bolts of it, Musk is clueless in how to get his Telsa operation up and running successfully.

        He doesn’t heed advice was very experienced manufacturing execs.

        He sells dreams but can’t honour them.

        • 0 avatar
          brandloyalty

          Ok, but doesn’t that correspond to what I said? And I think we can agree that Musk isn’t as bad a manufacturer as you depicted. Tesla is producing thousands of cars. Something few have managed to do since the big car companies were established.

          Is hype a characteristic of Tesla? Yes, but hype is everywhere these days.

          • 0 avatar
            geozinger

            @brandloyalty: One thing you mentioned was the fact that Tesla is producing cars in the US, as a US company. You’re correct, that hasn’t happened since the 1930’s (IIRC). Or at least without being based in a foreign country under the protection of same…

        • 0 avatar
          geozinger

          @Big Al: I wouldn’t say that Musk doesn’t know how to run his companies. I’d almost say he has too many to run.

          OTOH, I haven’t a clue as to how to run what he has and I doubt anyone else does, either. We like to think of progress as a straight line, but it almost never actually happens that way.

    • 0 avatar
      Victor

      Elon Musk might be a real Tony Stark and capable of some seriously amazing achievements, but he is going after companies that have been around for at least the better part of a century, while surviving recessions, wars, technological evolutions and revolutions. Heck, GM could pull out collaboration with both Hitler and Roosevelt in WW2 and still come out pretty darn rich at the end. That’s pretty damn Illuminati shit right there if you ask me.

      And also GM has got away with producing crapmobile for at least 50 years and counting.

      And then comes along this Preston Tucker Mk2, going after volume. Of course he would take a autonomous semi load of shit from specialized press on weekly basis. Come on, we know better how the auto industry auto press really work, right?…

      Yes, Tesla did not create the EV, GM was already embarrassing itself with the EV1 when Elon Musk was still on his CoD days or whatever. But Tesla created the Desirable EV, and nobody can take that away from him, regardless of how many deathwatch counts this full-of-hate-and-rant, almost-missing-bertel-schmidt-days TTAC of late wants to start.

      Yes, he might go under on the count of a miss-managed Model 3 project just for the sheer ambition of the whole thing. But the undeniable fact is that the Model S is now six years old and still turns heads and generates so much interest from the grand audiences, simply because it is a groundbreaking product. So much that Porsche, the beloved honey pie of the auto industry, is still playing catch-up to it.

      Maybe it really hurts that an outsider has done so much, while the while the bosses of yore are behaving like Bob Lutz is right now. Maybe it is just jealousy, who could know for sure…

  • avatar
    Luke42

    Dear Steph Williams,
    I had to stop reading the article halfway through, because the EV enthusiast community is being mischaracterized here. Your surprise at this result comes from a lack of understanding of EV enthusiasts.

    If you spend any significant time in EV-world or Tesla-world, you’ll find that the groupthink universally embraces new non-Tesla EVs — just so long as the car is a serious effort.

    The cars which aren’t embraced are the so-called Compliance Cars, which are sold in limited volumes and at a loss just to comply with the California mandates. Examples of this are the Golf EV, the Fiat 500 ED, and so on.

    Serious EV efforts, where the carmaker wants to sell as many cars as they can, are considered respectable and the commenting community will state their respect white vehemently. The Model 3, The Bolt, and The Leaf all meet this criteria. The seriousness of other efforts are debatable, and often hotly debated.

    EV people love their vehicles for a variety of reasons. For instance, I first took a test drive of a LEAF for environments and geeky reasons (I’m both an engineer and an environmentalist). But the fantastic NVH and the low-end torque blew me away. I will not buy another gasoline-powered car if an EV is available.

    I’m a Tesla Model 3 reservation holder. I’m very interested in the Bolt, as well, since it would also be a good fit for our needs. However, my local Chevrolet dealer Informed me that they wouldn’t be carrying it, and politely asked me to stop asking them when I would be able to buy one. So, Chevy is out for me personally, even though the car itself looks very good (especially in person).

    One other thing worth mentioning: I’m a green car enthusiast, and I learned to wrench on cars with my dad. I don’t really care about fast cars, unless it also happens to be electric. We owned a Prius for 12 years, and I dug into both the technical information and the Prius enthusiast community. Those were good times! I can’t wait to love a car like that again — but it’s going to have something other than a a more-refined and EFI’d version of my grandfather’s old gas engine under the hood.

    • 0 avatar
      brandloyalty

      If ttac continues the ev-hate long enough it will lose readership. Verticalscope needs to consider the long range success of this site. It doesn’t have to worship ev’s, but this overt snark is tedious, inappropriate and past its due date.

      • 0 avatar
        trackratmk1

        @brandloyalty, why do you think TTAC publishes so many Tesla articles? They may be clickbait, but the comment section always inflames. It’s exactly what they want, emotional reactions from both sides of the EV aisle. I bet their Tesla articles are top performers on the site.

    • 0 avatar
      civicjohn

      Oh, so you participated in Tesla’s ZEV credit sales. Got it.

      Man, also points off for spelling. Spel chek still works.

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      FWIW, you only have ONE Chevy dealer near you? The US is lousy with Chevy dealers. Would it really be that hard to seek out another one?

      • 0 avatar
        rpn453

        I’m in a low population density area of the Canadian prairies, and I have about a dozen Chevrolet dealers within a Bolt’s range.

        But some people don’t seem to like to stray very far for car purchases.

        I just hope he’s not blaming Chevrolet at all for an independent dealer’s decisions.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    I really don’t understand the EV hate, at least as far as it concerns the cars themselves. I was never crazy about the subsidies the original Prius got, but it did pave the way for more models like that.

    In the ~15-20 or so years since the original Insight, Prius and the Saturn EV-1 appeared on the market, the electrification of the mainstream car continues to accelerate (ha!) and the bonus is more fuel available for all of us.

    I think that it’s good we have the choice of all of these different cars. We can all find something that suits our needs and doesn’t force us into conformity.

    • 0 avatar
      civicjohn

      Then you must hold TSLA stock. Don’t worry about a downside, the stock will ignore it.

      But, keep missing those M3 ship dates, and shipping an old Roadster into space might not cover your position.

      • 0 avatar
        geozinger

        Nope, don’t own any TSLA stock. Unless my retirement fund does, unbeknownst to me. I’ve been on this blog for years, I’m sure some recognize me as a GM fanboi, more so than anything else.

        I really don’t understand the dislike of Musk and his enterprises. I tend to think of them as a contemporary analogue to Henry Ford and the pioneers of automobiles at the turn of the last century.

      • 0 avatar
        2000ChevyImpalaLS

        “Then you must hold TSLA stock.”

        So if you offer an opinion that doesn’t slam Tesla or EVs, you must own stock in the company? When did the world become this binary, all-or-nothing place?

        Also, Luke- have to agree with Geozinger that there are many, many Chevrolet dealers. I can’t believe you wouldn’t shop around.

      • 0 avatar
        bryanska

        “Then you must hold TSLA stock”

        It’s 1998 again and we’re using that old newsgroup reply!! America is great again!

    • 0 avatar
      brandloyalty

      The gas price issue is a great one to raise. Ev-haters should realize that every ev and hybrid sold reduces demand for gas, which lowers the prices, which directly benefits their pocketbooks. And indirectly, lower fuel costs are manifest in heating fuel and all goods and services.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    The $35,000 Model 3 has always been, and will always be a fantasy. This has been said for literally years now.

    • 0 avatar
      trackratmk1

      Exactly. It’ll be like buying a single item off the value menu at McDonalds. Not satisfying on its own, literally made just to get you to buy something else to go along with it… yes, sure I’ll take the fries too.

      The 35k Model 3 will be a penalty box built in hilariously low production numbers, especially since it won’t be a profitable car.

  • avatar
    Tele Vision

    I love the idea of 100% torque at 0 RPM. I hate the idea of ‘Range Anxiety’. Knowing nearly nothing about electric cars doesn’t help, I admit, but I DO know I can’t commute to work in one in the Winter. I need AWD/4WD and the ability to punch through the odd 20″ snowdrift or climb out of a ditch after avoiding a herd of elk at 4:00 AM on a dark December morning. My F-One-And-A-Half does this quite easily. I’d wager my employer wouldn’t like me charging an electric car all day at work, either, which was the first idea that popped into my mind when I briefly thought about an electric car. That probably isn’t an option, anyway.

    • 0 avatar
      brandloyalty

      No one claimed the ev’s currently available are the best vehicle for every application. Just that they are good enough for what most cars are typically used for.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        “No one claimed the ev’s currently available are the best vehicle for every application. Just that they are good enough for what most cars are typically used for.For anyone that owns a home ”

        For the millions upon millions of multi-car households in the US, an EV as a second or third vehicle is pretty much a no brainer.

  • avatar
    jpolicke

    If GM had any balls they would really twist the knife and run a promotion “Bring us your deposit refund check and Chevy will match it for a Bolt!”

    It’s not like Musk wouldn’t do it if he could.

    • 0 avatar
      brandloyalty

      Why would Chev want to sell more Bolts? I thought everyone was claiming they are sold at a loss.

      • 0 avatar
        HotPotato

        Everyone has heard the (unproven) claim that GM loses $9k on each one. But today I read the (unproven) claim that each Bolt is worth $13.5k to GM by enabling them to keep making high-profit gas-guzzlers. In any case, even if that’s not so, GM could lose money now and still come out ahead later by using its customers as real world beta testers re: range and performance in various conditions for its electric powertrain, which will inevitably be employed more often in the future—I would be surprised if OnStar isn’t beaming vehicle data back for analysis.

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    I’m not convinced Tesla knows how to engineer &manufacture a car that can go the long haul. I suspect that once they get a few years on them they’ll start to self destruct like a Yugo a day past its factory warranty period!………LOL

    • 0 avatar
      brandloyalty

      The 2017 Consumer Reports rating for Tesla put them above average for reliability. Probably they do even better when compared to peer BMW’s, Mercedes, Cadillacs.

  • avatar
    Astigmatism

    The lease on my GTI ran to this upcoming May. I’ve read very positive reviews of how the Model 3 drives, and if it’d been available I would have gotten one in a heartbeat, but no realistic chance. I test drove the Bolt and was genuinely impressed and surprised by how much I enjoyed driving it. EV torque is a really cool parlor trick. But ultimately I wanted a car with more than one parlor trick, and wasn’t willing to spend the next three years living with anodyne steering and a cut-rate interior just for how much fun it was to floor it at 30mph.

    Hopefully by the time my new Alfa Giulia’s extended warranty is up seven years from now, there will be a truly viable, actually _available_ EV that caters to people who actually enjoy driving. In the meantime, my wife still really wants to trade in her SUV for a Bolt, just as soon as she no longer needs it to get her lab equipment up and down the east coast.

  • avatar
    orenwolf

    In other news, water found to be wet.

    How is this surprising or newsworthy? If I had a lease up for expiry or otherwise needed a vehicle now and wanted electric, with a model 3 unavailable would I not choose my runner up? Of course I would.

    Unless this somehow means Tesla isn’t literally going to sell every car they can produce, there’s nonstory here.

    • 0 avatar
      brandloyalty

      It’s just ttac trolling the depths for negative angles on Tesla. But if ttac had courage in its claimed conviction, there would be a Tesla Death Watch series.

  • avatar
    amca

    Just imagine of the Bolt hadn’t been styled to appeal to Birkenstock-wearing librarians.

    Imagine if the Bolt had some sporting appeal like the Model 3.

    It’d be sold out past the Model 3.

    Why, can anyone explain, did the Bolt have to be so totally homely and unappealing?

  • avatar
    ceipower

    With GM’s well documented failures when it come to new technology, I could never invest in any GM. Once burned , twice shy? In any case everyone has the right to spend their dollars as they choose. Electric car advancements are very likely to continue an if solid state batteries live up to the hype , it probably would be smart to wait.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    If the Kia Niro EV was available today, I’d cancel my Model 3 reservation immediately and go buy one.

    I may cancel anyway, because of the high price and the terrible driver interface, where 95% of the functions go through a GUI. I’m also not interested in being branded with the Tesla logo. I was interested in the car for its long range, performance, and good looks.

    As others have noted here, the anti-Tesla trolling by TTAC has probably exceeded the GM bashing during its 2009 meltdown. It fits the definition of envy. There is a regularity to the glee at TTAC to see Tesla fail.

    TTAC is gradually diverging from being “The Truth About Cars”.

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