By on August 22, 2017

Hyundai santa cruz concept

Hyundai intends to launch a small pickup truck in the United States as part of its plan to catch up with the industry’s shift away from sedans. Up until now, that strategy has involved cramming as many SUVs onto the market as possible. But Hyundai brand sales are still dragging behind 2016’s monthly averages in the U.S., with end-of-year estimates falling short of company goals.

The solution is to keep pushing the Tucson, start deliveries on the Kona mini SUV before 2018, and begin development of a pickup truck based on the Santa Cruz concept from 2015 (seen above). Hyundai is also rumored to be planning on adding three additional sport utility vehicles or crossovers to its North American lineup by 2020 — helping it shore up waning sedan and hatchback sales.

As small trucks don’t arrive in the U.S. market with any regularity, this is rather exciting news. Assumedly, the Hyundai pickup will be assembled in the United States to avoid the dreaded chicken tax. Otherwise, the Korean automaker might as well spend its money funding a space program to shoot its remaining capital into the sun. Its massive SUV pant in Alabama seems like the best choice — however, that facility is already operating at capacity, leaving little room for another vehicle.

Hyundai santa cruz concept

Regardless, Michael J. O’Brien, vice president of Hyundai’s corporate and product planning, told Reuters that the automaker is a go for development on a pickup truck similar to the Santa Cruz. Like the concept vehicle, the production version will probably attempt to bridge the gap between car and truck as a North American ute. The odds of it using the Santa Cruz’s 2.0-liter diesel (making 190 horsepower and 300 lb-ft of torque) are doubtful, however. We expect to see a turbocharged gasoline engine and a hybridized variant instead.

The pickup’s size is also up for questioning. While having it based off the show car would make it significantly smaller than most of North America’s offerings, building it too small could be a sales curse. Likewise, going too large would place it up against industry veterans like the Ford F-150. Realistically, it’ll probably find itself in direct competition with Honda’s Ridgeline — which has carved out a niche for itself without becoming an overt sales magnet — whether it’s a little bigger or smaller than its unibody rival.

Hyundai santa cruz concept

Hyundai is green-lighting the pickup into development mainly because of the overwhelmingly positive feedback received from the Santa Cruz. Uniqueness had a helping hand in that, so going too mainstream likely isn’t in the cards. But this is a small truck best suited for hauling furniture and weekend excursions, not the mammoth junk-haulers Americans buy in droves. While we like the idea of a spiritual successor to the Subaru BRAT, the rest of the sales region may not. Can it really help influence Hyundai’s sales figures?

“Our glasses are fairly clean,” O’Brien said. “We understand where we have a shortfall.”

The brand’s 2017 U.S. sales are down nearly 11 percent through the end of July, with the Sonata losing 30 percent during those first seven months. But Hyundai’s current SUV lineup is up 11 percent during the same timeframe and dealers have noticed. They’ve been begging the automaker to provide them with as many SUVs and trucks as the company can muster.

“We are optimistic about the future,” Scott Fink, chief executive of Hyundai of New Port Richey, Florida, said. “But we are disappointed that we don’t have the products today.”

Hyundai santa cruz concept

[Images: Hyundai]

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71 Comments on “Hyundai Hopes to Solve U.S. Sales Woes With Slick Little Pickup...”


  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Like the looks, but it needs 4 ‘real’ doors.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      I was thinking the opposite. Avoid direct head to head with the Ridgeline, by offering non-crew variants. Either for more urban friendly length, or to get a longer bed while still staying short(ish.)

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        It’s based on the Tucson platform so smaller than the Ridgeline.

        The concept had an extendable bed, so would be great if that made it to production.

        Took long enough for the top bosses to greenlight this.

    • 0 avatar
      Higheriq

      I too am thinking the opposite – A trucklet like the one pictureove would probably make me a Hyundai customer. But with four doors? Never.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Clamshell doors should be fine as long as the rear seat is actually useable.

      I think the Fiat Strada pulls it off fairly well:
      tinyurl.com/yc2laxnb

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      “Like the looks, but it needs 4 ‘real’ doors.”

      No, it doesn’t. I really like the Hyundai exactly as it’s shown. The clamshell (suicide) doors actually make this concept design work because I simply don’t want and don’t need a full time second row.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        If Hyundai wants to sell this in any significant numbers, they will need to offer a full 4 door variant along with the model pictured.
        Care to tell me which Jeep Wrangler sells better? the 2 door or the 4 door?
        Extend that question to domestic full sized pickups, 4 door trucks outsell both regular cab and extended cab units.

        • 0 avatar
          Higheriq

          Understood, but some of us refuse to buy anything with more than two doors.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Higheriq – I would buy a regular cab 1/2 ton over an extended cab small truck. If one has family then you can’t have a regular cab unless you leave them at home.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            … and if one doesn’t have family, Lou, there is no need for the extra two doors. All that’s needed is enough room behind the front seats to drop a golf bag, bowling balls or simple groceries while the bed in back can be ‘saved’ for those bigger, clumsier loads.

  • avatar
    Kenn

    4 ‘real’ doors – and the uniqueness (and sportiness) disappears. Not needing to carry passengers in the rear, I’ve had – and like – rear-hinged side access doors. What I’d like to see would be a somewhat longer, deeper, more-useful bed.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      I’m irritated that full size pickups have ditched the rear hinged doors for the extended cabs. Those extended cab doors are so dinky when front hinged.

      • 0 avatar
        BrianL

        The rear hinged doors are horrible in parking lots. Park to close (or someone to close to you) and getting in and out is a real pain. But I think the extended cabs are a joke now too. Just not enough room. I like the full double cab design.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        You can still get clam shells on the truck that really matters the F series.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      I now have a clam shelled 4dr Supercab F150 in the fleet and they are a pain in tight parking lots. I vastly prefer a proper front hinged door that doesn’t need the front opened first. Which is fine since it is really intended for the kids and my wife to drive and so I have a truck available to haul stuff to work on my properties in the county where they live. So the Supercab 6.5′ bed is a good compromise for its intended use.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Between the door jamb and arm rest, I just need 12″ to slide out of the (previous gen F-150) driver’s door, in tight parking spaces. But that’s exactly the opening it takes to swing open the rear “suicides”.

        OK I’m kinda fat, and Yes I really like the front-hinged rear doors. I’ll swing them both open in the parking lot, parking structure, or trial head, (parked next to a large vehicle) and change my shirt and pants/shorts for the “occasion” when I arrive or take off.

        I want to wear something comfortable when I drive long distances, and arrive at the meeting just in time, and change on the spot, into a freshly pressed suit (clean, no food stuck to it!).

        Plus I’m driving great distance (suicide missions) CO to CA nonstop except for fuel/food/drink. So I’m pounding energy drinks and have to pull over to *release the energy* quite often. So stopped on the shoulder with the right side clamshell open, it looks like I’m just searching for something in the back.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    The Santa Cruz is currently coming to market with all the swiftness that VW showed in finally building the Atlas.

  • avatar
    Big Al From 'Murica

    Well this will add tens of sales to Hyundai’s totals

  • avatar
    arach

    This is going to be a failure.

    BUT I love it and can’t wait to buy one.

    Used in 8 years. (IF it depreciates as fast as every other hyundai, comes with a manual transmission 4 full doors, has good offroad cred, and that cool extended bed)

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      I hope its a winner. Hyundai can rebuild its momentum, or go down fighting, with unique and diverse products, making a name for themselves other than “they’re a lot better than they used to be”.

      Better than sitting on their thumbs, hoping the Sonata will come roaring back in the face of the strongest redesign of the Camry in many years, not to mention an all new Accord and upcoming Altima replacement in an ever-shrinking segment. Also preferable to them depending too heavily on me-too crossovers that also have very strong competition, some with merits that can’t be found in a Hyundai.

      Exploring new segments and taking risks is welcomed in my book, even if I’m not exactly a fan of the result itself (CH-R, Juke, Aztec).

      I wish them the best with it. I hope it becomes their Wrangler/Accord/Tahoe/Explorer-like success story.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        The refreshed Sonata seems like a good enough improvement to, at the very least, keep sales from falling further.

        An all new Sonata isn’t that far away, along with the SF Sport and 3-row SF replacements.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Oh, and if its like past Hyundais, it’ll be nearly used up by 8 years.

      They also need to improve long-term reliability, this will help resale. As will abandoning rental fleets, something hard to do when retail car sales are dropping like flies.

      • 0 avatar
        TonyJZX

        I think we are hoping a leopard changes its spots but yes, I’m not sure how well a 2010 Hyundai holds up today.

        Moreso are we expecting a Hyundai truck to last?

        But I feel that this is a pipedream. We seen these concept photos two years ago? I suspect we will see these in 2020 and Hyundai will still be mulling production./

        Sure, Jan.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        C’mon now, Hyundai has better long-term reliability now than Ford.

  • avatar
    carguy

    I wouldn’t call this a truck but more “truck themed transportation”

    Its Hyundai trying to prove to the world that the Honda Ridgeline is way too much truck.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      For some, it may indeed be too much. Better gas mileage and a smaller footprint with an open deck cargo area would fit the needs of those who used a basic 4 cylinder Ranger for a daily driver, both as a commuter and an occasional Home Depot vehicle. It was economical and practical enough for that with no issue. It usually supplemented mom’s minivan or sedan, but a 4 door version could serve as a small/occasional family vehicle.

      It doesn’t have to be a hardcore truck to be useful to people who don’t need or prefer a hardcore truck.

      • 0 avatar
        carguy

        @JohnTaurus: I am all for compact 4 cylinder trucks but this is more like a Subaru Baja/Brat.

      • 0 avatar
        Clueless Economist

        JohnTaurus gets it. Too bad the writer doesn’t.

        There is a reason 4 cylinder Ranger owners are paying whatever it takes to keep their truck on the road; there isn’t anything like it being sold today.

        The more it resembles the Ridgeline, the less I will like it. I don’t need or want a four door truck. I am not a soccer mom carry around the kiddos. I want the longer “coupe” door. Easier to get in and out of.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          It’ll have short doors and “clamshells” if it’s like the concept. That’s if they ever shut up and build the thing.

          The truck makes sense on paper, but so do 2-door coupe runabouts which aren’t particularly profitable, nor do their buyers wish to option them up.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          A 4 cylinder Ranger at least was available with a 6 or 7 foot box.
          How well did the Ford Explorer Sport Trac sell compared to the Ranger?

          BTW, I’ve owned a new Reg cab 4×4 Ranger 7 ft box and owned a used extended cab Ranger with a 6 ft box.

          As far as I’m concerned, there is no sense in buying any truck with a box shorter than 6 feet. You might as well get an SUV.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      Carguy: “Its Hyundai trying to prove to the world that the Honda Ridgeline is way too much truck.” Please can I steal that line, it is a classic.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    Here is my prediction.

    First full year they will move between 35-40K
    2nd year 30-35K
    3rd year 20-25K
    4th year unlikely to top 20K
    5th year again unlikely to top 20K though we might see a bit of a rebound as people buy a second one.
    6th another rebound as it is announced that it is being discontinued.

    Total sales will be under 150K before discontinuation.

    • 0 avatar
      bienville

      Here is my prediction:

      They will sell one. To Vulpine. Who’ll spend all day complaining about how big it is and that you can’t get it with crank windows and manual locks.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      My prediction 1/2 those numbers, despite the fact that for most Home Depot runs this thing would be plenty of “truck”.

      I like smaller trucks because anything full-size seems like overkill. I had Ranger Splash Extra cab V6 and it was fine. I now have a Dakota Quad Cab V8 and its is perfect. Granted for me towing is #1, passenger volume #2 and bed size is #3 on the list of things my truck must do. My current boat is only 16 foot so I don’t need mega torque thus a small diesel would be perfect. I’ve never needed 8 foot bed, the biggest thing I’ve loaded up was a jon boat and we just put a red flag on it, strapped it down super tight and let 4 feet hang out the back. After that a BBQ grill, some bikes, various pieces of furniture, some plywood and mulch/sod/rocks are have been back there. In general my rule is if takes more then 2 people to load its too big.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    I REALLY like this. I know it won’t look anything like the concept, but I would gladly buy a compact 2-seater pickup like this. Have a little space behind the seats for indoor storage and a small bed when I need it and I’m happy.
    I don’t want anything nearly as large as a Colorado. The Tacoma and Frontier feel like penalty boxes when not a double cab or 4×4. Although I would probably be interested in a Tacoma XRunner if they still made them.

    The key is to be able to price this low enough that you aren’t competing with a 4×4 anything. I think $25k for a nicely optioned one for the first year would go a long way to get people in the seats.

    I think we need to stop pretending that people don’t want to BUY compact pickups. It’s that makers don’t make enough profit off of them and they know people who want them will ultimately buy a more expensive larger truck if a smaller one doesn’t exist.

    • 0 avatar
      indi500fan

      I parked my old S-10 (ext cab 4×4) next to a Colorado of similar config the other day.

      I was surprised how BIG the Colorado was, even though both are basically two passenger and same size bed.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        Finally, people are expressing the sentiments I’ve been expressing for almost 10 years. Pickup trucks are too big and if you want a truck that won’t be cannibalized by the full-sized models, you need to make them as small as the first mid-sized models… not these jacked-up Road Whales™.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      … except that I, for one, have been actively avoiding the larger trucks as have many other people BECAUSE they’re not small enough!

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        “Finally, people are expressing the sentiments I’ve been expressing for almost 10 years.”

        No not really. It is more of a case of rarity. In the past 10 years there just hasn’t been a lot of people interested in tiny trucks!

  • avatar
    klossfam

    Hyundai is a little bit ‘damned if they do, dammed if they don’t’ with this…They really need to put it in the mix with the current midsize trucks to be taken seriously, but it they do, the competition is tough (I’m a full size RAM and Ridgeline owner and I KNOW the Ridgeline is a REAL truck from using it’s capabilities).

    That being said, the Santa Cruz concept will have to be seriously beefed up to compete with the Ridgeline, GM Twins et al. If they go one step down (true compact pick up with a 2.0T powertrain), I think there is a market, but how big will it really be? The Ridgeline is a great truck as is the GMC Canyon and they sell well under 5,000 units a month COMBINED.

    So if Hyundai could live with a true compact pick up selling only 2,000 units or less a month, it might then make sense to stay out of the midsize battlefield…

  • avatar
    carguy67

    Subaru Brat redux.

    • 0 avatar
      Toad

      …or Chevrolet SSR redux. For the that matter the El Camino or Ranchero.

      Every past attempt to sell a combination of an automobile based coupe with a pickup bed has failed pretty miserably. Since there is almost no current demand for two door pickup trucks OR two door cars I don’t know why Hyundai thinks that combining the two will be successful.

      Hyundai dealers need CUV’s and they get this instead? They can’t be happy.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        SSR was marketed to the Camaro customer with Corvette pricing, that’s why it failed. The El Camino/Ranchero died during the Malaise era when quality and design fell through the floor and was never picked up again (… get it?).

        I’ve talked to many people over the years and the reason they’re driving the smaller CUVs is the simple fact that they can’t get a true, compact, pickup truck. They were complaining about trucks the size of my ’97 Ranger so you can imagine how they felt about the big Colorado!

        No, these things may not compete with the full-sized trucks in numbers but they could wipe out the current mid-size market, which would be all the better to me.

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus

    I hope its successful. As I said above, I admire an automaker willing to step outside traditional comfort zones, especially when opening up an empty market segment.

    I welcome other entries to diversify our choice in transportation. A small unibody truck may be just the ticket for some.

    They should do two different unibody trucks, one based in Tucson, one based on bigger version of the Santa Fe.

    To me, the smaller would be more car-like, the larger one would follow a path similar to the Ridgeline. The smaller aims to recapture people who used to daily drive compact trucks before they were supplanted by midsize models. The other would better suit the needs of those who actually plan to tow a boat, and/or go down a trail with deep washouts and mud holes, following the path of the Honda Ridgeline.

    Not saying anyone buying a Ridgeline or the Hyundai equivalent should be laughing at people in Jeep Rubicons, but there are places where a car won’t do, but a more purpose-built unibody vehicle with decent clearance, adequately strong structure and a decent AWD system is all people need. Offering an open cargo area sets it apart from CUVs of similar capability.

    Then, Ford builds unibody trucks based on the Transit Connect and next-gen Explorer, the latter offering car-like dynamics and fuel economy over the V-6then North American Ford Ranger. FCA enters with their unibody trucks currently sold elsewhere. GM might as well base one off the Equinox.

    As people turn away from traditional cars, and CUVs become more common place and anonymous, something different will be a way for some to express themselves, to stand out from the crowd, and/or use their vehicle for things a CUV with a carpeted and permanently enclosed cargo area can’t be used for. It’ll represent an even more active lifestyle than CUVs attempt to do.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      *by then, not “V-6then”

    • 0 avatar
      klossfam

      Very good points…Also, once people have a vehicle with a bed aka pickup, it is hard to go back. I switched from a sedan to a pickup in 2011 and not sure that I’d ever own another vehicle type (I’ve had two half tons and two Ridgelines since 2011).

      In Canada, they really understand this (despite higher fuel prices than the States). I believe some months in Canada pickups are a mid-50% share of the ENTIRE vehicle market. Actual ‘cars’ are less than a third most months.

      I’m not saying everyone NEEDS a pickup or SUV/CUV but there is a reason – for example – why small CUVs are so popular…People need practicality and the ability to never be stuck at Home Depot trying to force a large item in the trunk of a sedan.

  • avatar
    dallas_t4r

    Narrator: It won’t.

  • avatar
    Higheriq

    I foresee a much watered down weak effort and something much different from the one pictured above. We will end up with four real doors, no manual transmission, and something very close to a Ridgeline. IOW: YAWN.

  • avatar
    scottcom36

    $5.00/gallon gas and this would be a success. At $2.29, not so much.

  • avatar
    RS

    It’s about time someone went smaller with a truck design. Especially compared to the bloat midsize trucks have taken on. Most new full size and midsize trucks are too tall to be really useful.

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    http://www.hyundai.co.za/commercial-vehicles/showroom/light-commercial/h100/

    Hyundai’s new pickup looks quite a bit different than concept.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    Simply put: Don’t change the size. The size demonstrated at the car shows is almost EXACTLY the size many people want, as mid-size and full-size trucks are simply too large for many people. I would buy the truck EXACTLY as shown, though hopefully with some real pigment colors and not these boring monochromatic ones that are killing the market.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      “…almost EXACTLY the size many people want…”

      “Many” may not be a sustainable market. While they were still building them mid/late ’80s,
      many stopped buying mini-trucks for something else, you included. Many bought mini-trucks based entirely on “price”.

      Dealers stocked rows upon rows of them, all complete strippers, just pick your color. Radios, air cond, rear bumpers and right side-view mirrors were dealer (installed) “options”, except for SR5, XLT, STX or similar “high end” models, which were rare, same with automatics.

      As mini-truck’s cut-rate pricing “got real”, so did most of their audience.

      It was an artificial market, never meant to be. Many were non traditional pickup buyers. Many of my high school teachers bought new mini-trucks.

      It got to be a very Hot trend.

      My sister’s 1st new car was a mini-truck. Same with my aunt. My dad was a repeat pickup buyer but his Datsun (By Nissan) was his 1st (an last) non fullsize.

      Who could resist their absurdly low prices? Of course that could not sustain.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        Uh huh. Sure Denver. We’ve heard it all before. You’ve never been able to support that statement, either. The world changes, Denver. The market changes. The fact that the current mid-sized trucks sell at all shows there’s a market for smaller trucks. The problem is, the “smaller trucks” are still too close to the size of the bigger trucks… so aren’t really addressing the Small Truck market.

        I’ve acknowledged they’ll never sell as well as full-sized but they WILL sell better than the current mid-size and will probably cannibalize a massive proportion of those mid-size sales.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          FWD/awd pickups are “niche market” at best, especially 2-seaters. I’m not sure what you’re thinking. Unless you think you’re smarter than automakers.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            As I said, Things Change. Clearly the automakers have out-smarted themselves which is why GM and others are losing money despite being the biggest in the industry. Even Ford’s profits are down despite being #1 in truck sales.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Yes exactly “things change”. Except you’re talking about going back in time, backwards thinking and living in the past.

            Welcome to 2004! (baby steps…)

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Haven’t you ever heard the phrase, “History repeats itself,” Denver? Think about it for a moment. History is repeating itself right now with the retro-styled cars we’re seeing from all the manufacturers one way or another so why is it so impossible for “mini-trucks” to also see a resurgence?

            Personally, I’m waiting for the BEVs, whereupon the absolute need for maximum aerodynamics can be dropped and we start getting truly unique styling from each brand again. How would you like a BEV retro-modded ’57 Nomad, hmmm?

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            We were just done, finished with mini-trucks, like we were over station wagons and custom/surfer/molester vans. There will be ongoing niche segments for some of these, but for “mainstream”, no, never.

            What you’re not getting is, there wasn’t even a natural market/demand for compact pickups, early ’80s, never mind the FWD based, unibodies. Japanese automakers systematically dumped imported pickups on the US market, at cut-rate pricing. Hell yes they were well received.

            The “Voluntary” embargo on Japanese autos never included “pickups”. So they saw a loophole and exploited it to the maximum degree. Who could resist sporty pickups at crazy, low prices. Japanese cars were still getting shipped over but were pricey, with base models hard to come by, in favor of hard loaded models.

            Japanese automakers had to make every shipped car “count”. There were widespread reports of “price gouging” too, so it made import “pickups” from the same manufacturers that much more attractive, especially the stone-cold strippers.

            So the mini-truck trend started to snowball. All the while Japanese automakers scrambled to set up US assembly plants for their autos. Import pickup prices started to rise/level off, as those plants came on-line.

            The utilitarian nature of pickups was loved by those never having owned pickups, and it helped fuel the next hot trend, SUVs…

            By ’91, SUVs became exempt from the Gas Guzzler tax, and that was the final nail in the mini-truck craze “coffin”.

            Mini pickups became exempt too at the same time, so that’s when the started to grow and lead to crew cabs soon enough.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            We’ve argued this many times before, Denver, and you have never, ONCE, been able to prove your statements. The problem is that you’re trying to link disparate events that had no direct and only minor indirect effects on the market.

            Again I say, the market is out there for truly small trucks along the lines of the old mini-trucks. These modern mid-sized trucks are barely tapping the very upper edge of that market. There are people who want smaller trucks… in the size class of the compact SUV/CUV. Today’s trucks don’t even try to address this market.

  • avatar
    oldowl

    I thought a Honda Ridgeline would do until I looked at one. Nice, but too big. I may be too used to wait for a Hyundai or other small pickup. Maybe find a 2003 or so Tacoma, like the one I once had, and rebuild what needs rebuilding.

  • avatar
    bikegoesbaa

    I an excited about this vehicle because I look forward to watching all the “Need moar small trucks, I’ll be first in line to buy one” people I know tie themselves in knots coming up with nit-picking reasons not to actually buy one.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Be prepared to cry then, because if this truck is small enough, there’s going to be a bunch of buyers. The only thing that would stop me from buying one is word that FCA is bringing the Strada/Ram 700 on shore before the Hyundai hits the showrooms.

      • 0 avatar
        Thomas Kreutzer

        Still a year or so out, but I will also be in line to buy one if the end product is close to what we are seeing here. Pay attention HyundaiUSA, I have cash!

        If they screw this up then my fallback plan will be a Nissan Hardbody 4×4 – the best one I can find as a start and then whatever it takes to put it back into decent, reliable shape.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          Yes! Build your own “mini-truck”, just the way you want it, with a sprinkling of modern tech, best of old and new. Some call them “resto-mods”

          Many are fed up with “modern” fullsize pickups, especially diesels, and building up “older pickups” to their specific tastes, needs and specs, say around MY2000 vintage, but starting with a clean, hard loaded, rust-free, low mileage examples.

          There’s plenty of those at reasonable prices in the southern, western states, and a there’s at least couple companies offering restored/rebuilt/bulletproofed heavy duty pickups and duallys, mostly 4X4 crew cabs, “turn-key”.

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