By on March 10, 2017

Mercedes-Benz Concept X-CLASS

Not unless it’s a big, honking full-sizer, that is.

After giving serious thought to introducing its X-Class pickup in the U.S., Mercedes-Benz has decided to stay away from the American market. Why? The midsize field probably isn’t a good place to make money with a luxurious pickup.

“At that point of time, there is no plan to introduce it in the U.S. market,” Daimler AG chairman Dr. Dieter Zetsche told Motor 1 at the Geneva Auto Show. “The main argument being that in the U.S. market, the premium pickup truck is a full-size pickup truck, and the premium midsize is somewhat of a conundrum.”

The upcoming X-Class borrows the Nissan Navara’s platform, but adds distinctive styling and a heap of niceties. With a maximum payload of 1.1 tons and four doors, the model seemed ready to challenge potential rivals in America’s growing midsize pickup market. Unfortunately for Mercedes, Americans seem to prefer Denali-sized luxury in a generously proportioned vehicle.

“So clearly it’s premium and not cheap, but clearly not expensive either,” Zetsche said of the X-Class’ square peg/round hole identity problem.

Any X-Class sent to the U.S. would be priced above the competition. For the same money, a buyer could likely go the domestic route and get similar creature comforts with a larger cabin, payload and bed size. Besides that, it’s simply easier for an automaker to pile luxuries onto a basic full-sizer, jack up the price by tens of thousands of dollars, and laugh all the way to the bank.

Should the market change, the Mercedes-Benz might reconsider its decision, Zetsche said.

[Image: Mercedes-Benz]

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151 Comments on “Mercedes-Benz Dashes America’s X-Class Dreams, Says a Premium Midsize Won’t Work...”


  • avatar
    thornmark

    I guess Merc reasoned basing its entry on worst in class Nissan bones probably isn’t a good idea.

    Imagine that.

    “SPLIT HITS THE FAN Furious customers urge Nissan to recall 4X4 Navaras after it emerges that major fault could see trucks snap in HALF” Owners have found severe rust which can cause cracks in the chassis and accuse Nissan of keeping issue ‘under wraps’
    EXCLUSIVE
    https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/2791663/nissan-navara-safety-fears/

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Um, Thornmark, I think you have the wrong pickup. The XClass is not based on a D40.

      Try again.

      • 0 avatar
        thornmark

        It’s still a Nissan and a Navarra. And Merc shouldn’t base it’s product on Nissan crap.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          It’s been rewarding discussing this with you.

          I initially thought you hadn’t realised your error.

        • 0 avatar
          johnnyz

          I’ve logged over 400k mi in Nissan’s, from 300zx to Maxima. Trouble free, faster than the other Jap crap and vastly more reliable than any of my Chevy trucks/ Tahoe etc…

          Quit bashing Nissan. Find me a new car for 36k that is faster, quieter and more luxurious than my 16 Maxima. Good luck.

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            I just had a 2017 Maxima was a rental – a very well equipped model. Color me extremely impressed. EXTREMELY.

            Only had it a couple of days and my nit list is rather short:

            1) Initial setup a bit overly complicated. A lot of options, I struggled once I got on I-80 to get the cruise control on and felt like an idiot. Once I figure it out, no issues (was at night)

            2) The sound system was bright and clear, but lacked any form of bass punch. The rear panels rattled if the bass was pushed. I’m guessing this was the non-super premium sound system and there is a further up option. HOWEVER I was left wondering if that system would just rattle plastic worse.

            That’s really it. Once I got some things configured for me it was a very nice ride. I walked away from it not understanding all the hatred for the Maxima. It definitely was luxurious, comfortable, fun to drive, and had solid manners.

    • 0 avatar
      MoDo

      Lol.. Mercedes would get slaughtered in this segment. It would cost 2X as much as a loaded GM, Ford or Ram. Have no more luxuries and even less capability. Rather than drop the gloves and compete, they stand on the sidelines and mock. Fuck off MB.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        MoDo,
        Are you new to TTAC? If you are welcome.

        From what I’ve read the “base” X Class will be priced similar to a global Ford XLT or SR5 Hilux.

        That would be in the mid 30 000 USD for a V6 crew cab 4×4. Right up to 60 000 for an AMG X Class (I would suspect crew cab 4×4).

        It will compete with the VW Amarok as well.

        So this would be competitive in the US against similarly equiped C twins.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al From 'Murica

          And there in lies your problem Al…Price. You stated mid 30’s. The F150 Crew Cab XLT in my driveway was 36k out the door. It has to compete there as well.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            L’il Al,
            A BMW, MB or for that matter any prestige vehicle generally costs more than an equivalent sized consumer bargain bucket,like a Altima, Camry, etc.

            Pickups are now more than ever alternative cars, CUVs, SUVs. So why would you not buy one? Why would it necessarily be better to have a fullsize?

            As I stated cars come in all shapes and forms. Why is their essentially only one for pickups?

            The C twins proved this incorrect.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            I agree with your assessment on luxury makes costing more. The problem is that we are talking trucks. Those emblems will not resonate in the same manner with most US truck buyers.

            It is not necessary to have a full sized truck, but trucks deemed as luxury trucks in the US are all full sized. It is just the nature of the market. If this vehicle overlaps with big trucks price wise, it will loose 9 times out of 10. US truck sales figures show this.

            Who is the target customer here? People who do not want a full sized truck? Fine, they are out there but how does this penetrate that market. It is not cheap so forget the fleets and skinflints that make up a sizable chunk of this market. The lifestyle set buys the Tacoma but maybe they could make some inroads there. Still, thats a pretty small pie. If you want to sell luxury trucks how do you sway people away from the King Ranches and Laramies they buy now. The specs for this truck don’t do it. Even if they don’t use it the towing and hauling is a selling point, though every King Ranch owner I know pulls a huge 5th wheel camper on occasion so this truck is out for them. It won’t ride as well if it is based on the Nissan bones…especially considering the Ram’s set up. So buy it for the nice interior? Maybe this isn’t an S class…Mercedes at this truck’s price point don’t have interiors that blow away top trim full sized trucks. So at mid 30’s you have to choose…small truck with nice interior or big truck with maybe cloth but more size and capability but is still very nicely equipped. The market shows by in large they go big. Maybe the truck has merit, but it isn’t competitive here for many reasons. Not bad maybe, but not a fit for this market. Mercedes is wise to see this. The US midsize market is well served based on demand with more trucks coming (the Ranger and eventually a new Frontier). This truck just doesn’t work here.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Big Al From ‘Murica – agreed. BAFO just doesn’t get it.
            How much would a “premium” Mercedes pickup truck cost?
            In Canada, a fully loaded Tacoma, Colorado or Ridgeline are around $50,000.
            There are minimal discounts on any of the small trucks. Last fall GM had huge discounts on 1/2 ton trucks. I could have purchased a 6.2 V8 8-speed LTZ crew 6.5 box 4×4 with max tow for a few thousand more than a loaded Colorado diesel.
            Mercedes was smart not to try to compete with the established players.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Lou_BC
            It is not going to sell in NA, but the take up rate here and outside NA is phenomenal. When released others will follow suit. Just think of it as a Mercedes SUV with a bed.
            On the other hand US Pickup demand here has become tiny. High Prices, and what used for?
            I can see why European manufacturers are now rushing into the segment, whereas before they turned their backs

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            RobertRyan – globally it will work but not in the land of Denali or Platinum Duallies.

  • avatar
    Big Al From 'Murica

    Good, I got in here before I had to read RobertRyan’s drivel about how we are missing out and this will be better than every fullsized US truck that has ever been or ever will be built.

    As to the article, yes. The market reality is that margins are thinner on these vehicles than Mercedes is likely accoustumed to.

    And Shove it RobertRyan

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Li’l Al,
      It’s a pity the US will not be able to get this.

      Even if MB could import some at a competitive price point.

      A midsizer with 261hp and 460ftlb would be nice ……. anywhere. This is not the AMG version which would have XD Titan diesel figures.

      Even grey imports are not allowed into the US.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        @BAFO – Somehow, I’m sure it has nothing to do with “a competitive price point”.

        First, what exactly would X-class be directly competing against?

        There has to be ridiculous “markup” regardless.

        And you obviously forget the whole ’80s Mini-Truck Explosion/Invasion/Fad. Those were mostly cheap/basic import pickups that still managed to severely undercut domestic mini-trucks.

        The Chicken tax is nothing new.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        We had a once vibrant “grey market”, but guess how many went to the trouble of importing a pickup? Try “zero”. That would’ve been dumb. We had plenty of pickups, as we do *now*.

        Maybe you’re not clear on the *concept*… A “Grey Market” is for things/items NOT available in your country, readily or otherwise, and at a TERRIFIC expense, with endless “red-tape”, no guarantee of “compliance”, and definitely no dealer warranty/support/parts/finance/leasing.

        Dumb and Dumber.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al From 'Murica

        Al, This is a tough sell in this market because, again if you need massive diesel torque the US pickup market already serves that up. You want a. Luxury truck…already served. You want both? Yeah, you can get that already from multiple sources in proven packages.

        And the HP and Torque figures you cite are outclassed by gas motors currently available in US half ton models. So you get the same problem everyone else has in this market…you have to really want a mid sized truck. Over 9 times out of 10 given the choice people choose the full sized truck. A significant number of those that don’t are: 1) fleets, 2) cheap old skinflints, or 3) Fiercely loyal to the Tacoma. That does not sound like a receptor for success for a company like Mercedes. Sure there is room for mid sized trucks and more people are opting for them, but it is not a huge pie and the needs of those who do buy such vehicles aren’t likely to buy this one in numbers sufficient to make a profit.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          It’s also about vehicle size.

          If what you state were true all CUVs, SUVs and cars would be large.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            I didn’t say there was no market Al, just a small one and this truck would be going after a small segment of that small market. The truck market isn’t the midsize car or CUV market…with trucks people typically get the bigger one all other things equal. We don’t really have an aversion to the size like Europeans and others would because most Americans don’t live in urban areas and driving and parking them isn’t a problem.

            With respect to SUV and CUVs though, show me one model where the new version was smaller than the version it was replacing. Midsize cars haven’t shrunk either (in their modern incarnation…yes in the late 1970s they shrunk for other reasons).

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Li’l Al,
            The US would be the largest X Class market. Maybe China would be larger.

            In Australia MB might sell 1 000 a month. All Ford needs to do is offer a 2.7 EcoBoost Ranger and a Lion diesel Ranger. This would make the Ford as, if not more expensive than the X Class. Maybe not the EcoBoost.

            I would also assume the X Class will be manufactured in Korea with other light MB commercial vehicles.

            This is a commercial MB, not a prestige vehicle. Its a pickup.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            “This is a commercial MB, not a prestige vehicle. Its a pickup.”

            Then it doesn’t fit with the Mercedes brand here. If they are going after that market they would have to do massive volume. All the articles say they were pushing it as a luxury truck…a market that is already well served and has more brand loyalty than any segment. It just doesn’t fit.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            L’il Al,
            The Caddy Silverado pickup station wagon is sold as a luxury vehicle in the US, It’s called the Escalade.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            L’il Al,
            “There is a small market”.

            But why? We now go back to pickup truck protection in the US.

            To produce pickups for the US market there needs to be 10s of thousands sold to make it viable.

            Remember, the chicken tax makes it prohibitive to import pickups.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            What’s “prohibitive”? Need I keep reminding you of the ’80s Mini-Truck Explosion/Invasion/Fad??

            What’s the difference? Other than there was terrific demand for cut-rate imported (through loopholes) Japanese pickups?

            Oh yeah, there has to be meaningful “demand”. Oh, damn! Except that’s not just true for trucks. There’s scores of low demand, “niche” world/global cars that can’t cut the mustard, for the US market, by the time they’re safe enough and run clean enough.

            Maybe there’s another BAFO somewhere, on some other site, crying about the lack of Tata and Nano-Nano sedan representation in the US???

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            “The Caddy Silverado pickup station wagon is sold as a luxury vehicle in the US, It’s called the Escalade.”

            Agreed…It is also a full sized truck.

            If this truck were competitive here, they’d sell it. There are many global trucks that just don’t cut the mustard here. We don’t get all those Chinese Great Wall trucks for example and nobody sheds a tear. Our truck market is vibrant and highly competitive. If you want to break into it you have to do your homework and make an effort. This truck doesn’t cut it.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            “The Caddy Silverado pickup station wagon is sold as a luxury vehicle in the US,” Try selling these in Europe, lucky to sell 5 a year

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            Well yeah RobertRyan, I agree the Escalade would be a slow seller in Europe. So how many VW Polos would VW sell in the US…That same 5. Yes the us and Europe a very different in how they live and what they drive. It is almost as if they are separated by a whole ocean. Who knew?

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          “Yes the us and Europe a very different in how they live and what they drive. It is almost as if they are separated by a whole ocean. Who knew?”
          Basically what this article is about, different markets have different needs.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Making a product decision based upon sound market research and clear self-awareness – how refreshing!

    M-B is right to refrain from this market segment.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      SCE to AUX,
      I would assume MB’s decisuon would of been different if they could import as opposed to manufacture.

      How much will it cost MB to set up a factory, equipment, plant, etc to have the X Class availble in the US market?

      The import tax on imported pickups makes it uncompetitive to import.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        @BAFO – Why would you think it’d need its own, dedicated “…factory, equipment, plant, etc…”??

        Oh yeah, you’re “BAFO”!

        It’s a “badge engineered” Navara (or Frontier if sold in the US). Call it a “trim level” only sold at Mercedes dealers. Like a Sierra to the Silverado.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        “…import tax on imported pickups makes it uncompetitive to import…”

        Funny, it WOULD be imported to Europe, EXCEPT they have their very own “Chicken Tax”. Oh well, it’ll be built at the Navara plant in Spain.

        So will it be “uncompetitive” in Europe then??

        And why are they still going forward with it???

        Just dumb.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @SCE to AUX
      They thought about making a US 1/2 ton Pickup, but canned that when it would have a restricted sales potential and profitability.. X- Class will join booming 1 Tonne Global pickup market.
      Latest very strong rumour is Volvo cars want to produce a Pickup.
      They will join , MB, VW and Renault ,who now are entering the market for the first time.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al From 'Murica

        Yeaaaah…because nobody is making any money in the US half ton market.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          L’il Al,
          What is the biggest factor allowing for those huge profits on US pickups?

          Lack of competition.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Yes lack of competition. Just like Coke. Nothing like the Real Thing! (BABY!!!) But build around 10 million copies of anything, per generation, with about 30% high end, plus sister SUVs…

            Building pickups is no way simple or cheap. To many OEMs lost their A$$ trying!!!

            Ask Toyota and Nissan why so little profit in their fullsize pickups, with very little Fleet and even less rebates…

            I’ll wait here………./////

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            There are 5 manufacturers building full sized pickups in the US to include Toyota. It is a highly competitive market. Additionally the big 3 consistently sit at 1,2, and 3 with respect to sales in the US…not truck sales, vehicle sales. The F-Series on many years is the best selling vehicle in the world. The US pickup market is far and away the biggest pickup market in the world. The competition is fierce and these sales represent the biggest profit makers for their respective makers and the amount of Research and Development put into them shows this. Is any truck maker spending on R&D a figure anywhere approaching the money Ford put into the F Series?

            If what you say is true, that Americans buy the trucks put out by the Detroit 3 not because they are good, but in spite of them being mediocre because they have no other choice, then where are the Tundra Sales? Titan XD? No the fact is the Big three’s trucks are in fact just that good.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            I should clarify, Best selling models…The big 3’s trucks were 1,2, and 3 last year. The best selling “car”, the Camry would be 4th.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    No Mercedes pickup.

    What’s next – armageddon?

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      No, another reduction in choice.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        We didn’t lose a truck “choice”, just a “Leatherette” trim level on the Frontier. There’s not enough snob appeal in Nissan trucks, for the X-class targeted buyers, even if there was Platinum or Frontier Limited.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        If the product NEVER came here, it isn’t a reduction in choice.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @Lou_BC
          Like VW, PSA, Renault, Toyota, Nissan, Mitsubishi. MB has a long list of vehicles that are not sold in the US. Lists includes Global best sellers

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            Interesting you speak of choice. I can buy a mid sized truck from multiple manufacturers here (a list that is growing BTW even without Mercedes). I can also buy fulsized trucks all the way up to the F450. All of these available from a dealer without the headache and cost of going grey market.

            Can you say that? I am not sure you having more mid sized trucks available means you have more choice. In reality the US truck market is far more diverse with respect to having different sizes available. I can get a mid sized truck from multiple manufacturers. Can you get a full sized truck, even one from the Japanese makers without paying stupid money and getting no parts support? Yeah, but you have more choices, right.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            Who is talking about Midsize Pickups?, I am talking about the full range of Trucks, Pickups and Vans. They are Global best sellers( No, not the F150 it is not Global)
            Yes we do have a greater range of Midsize Pickups
            US Pickup market is not the biggest in the world, probably biggest for one country. Global market outside NA is on par or bigger than the NA market
            Best selling vehicle in the world …Toyota Corolla

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            “Best selling vehicle in the world …Toyota Corolla”

            Yes, you are correct for 2016 according to here. http://focus2move.com/world-best-selling-car/

            Of course that non global F series is all the way back at number 2. It has in past years held the top spot however. To say it isn’t a force sales wise globally is stupid. Then there is the Silverado at 12 and the Ram at 16. The Hilux makes the list at number 18. Then it is a long way down to the next truck of any size or van. The Ford Transit, which sells in significant numbers in the US and globally hits at 47. The Isuzu D-Max comes in at 56. and a couple of other third world and China specials in the 80’s. There were also a couple of BOF SUV’s well down the list.

            Point is, you are wrong RobertRyan…North America, specifically the US is by far the largest pickup market in the world and frankly it isn’t even close and that market is completely dominated by full sized offerings from US manufacturers DESPITE major Japanese makes investing significant resources into breaking into that market. Other places have more mid sized offerings, but the range of sizes offered here are greater. You can buy mid sized, full sized, work trucks, luxury trucks, and global vans. The range is greater here and the trucks that the manufacturers invest the most in are only available here.

        • 0 avatar
          OldManPants

          “If the product NEVER came here, it isn’t a reduction in choice.”

          Heh… yeah, like I’m curiously unperturbed that I can no longer buy a Tata Nano in the US.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            One doesn’t go to a Chinese Restaurant and complain that they don’t have pizza on the menu.
            BiGal probably does.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            If a sandwich shop sells Vegemite sandwiches on 50 different styles of bread while the shop across the street sells Vegemite sandwiches on 5 different types of bread but also sells ham, pastami, roast beef, and all other manner of meats but with fewer bread choices, which shop offers the most choice?

            Yes, you get many mid sized trucks, more than us. But much like Vegemite many of them are rigs nobody wants here and would not sell if offered. Also we have choices beyond the midsize segment you don’t. So enjoy the Vegemite and I’ll enjoy a prosciutto with mozzarella secure in the knowledge that should I for whatever reason desire Vegemite I can find it.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            The one with the hot pastrami on rye.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            F Series only sells in NA,so it is not Globally important. They sell a lot of Kamaz trucks in Russia and the old CIS., but they only matter to Russians, F Series means a lot to NA, but nowhere else. Yes the Global Pickup market is now greater than the NA, will be 2.8 million in 2020 by MB estimates.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            @RobertRyan per the provided link Ford, Chevrolet, and Ram alone sold 2.2 million full sized trucks in 2016. That doesn’t count GMC Sierra sales, the midsize twins, nor Tundra and Tacoma or Frontier and Titan sales. If you are counting vans it doesn’t count those either. Nor does this account for SUVs based on those truck platforms. Yeah North America is the largest market for pickup trucks in the world and is roughly on par with the rest of the world combined.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    I know it’s a concept and all, but good god that thing looks horrible. In my mind a utilitarian vehicle like a pickup should derive its looks from a functional design (fat sidewall tires, sturdy bumpers). This thing is a rolling satire about everything wrong with current luxo-trims of the fullsizers here in the US (huge rims, dainty low hanging bumpers).

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @gtemnykh
      As a Concept it has landed in Australia and will be showed in various Cities
      http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a186/RobRyan7/image_zpsxlhrxfuf.jpg

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @Steph Willems it is 1.1tonne, Mercedes , Europeans use metric. 2,400lb in old imperial

  • avatar
    RHD

    Mercedes figured out that there are already enough high-dollar pickups in the US, and that trying to penetrate that market segment is likely to be difficult, slow and with sales results like the Lincoln Blackwood. Pickups in the US should not be finicky, high-maintenance, shiny baubles that you wouldn’t want to let get scratched, even inside the cargo bed.

    Any new truck would have to be as good as everything else, with a price advantage to persuade the potential buyer to switch brand loyalty. Mercedes no longer builds durable vehicles with good value. So in this case they made the right decision, at least for themselves.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @RHD
      They are following the money. Outside NA this class is booming. MB will not be the only Luxury . US ” Luxury” Pickups need to lift their game. If they come up to the standard of the Luxury MB Vans( like their cars) then you will have something

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al From 'Murica

        I’m sorry, how much Research and development is going into this truck for which the bones are being borrowed from a Mass market Japanese manufacturers competing product? I am reasonably confident that amount would be eclipsed by even the conservative redesign that happened at GM. Forget what Ford spent on the F series.

        The US makers take trucks seriously. It is Mercedes that would need to step up to the plate and design and build a real competitor, not leather line a Navarra. With regards to the luxury trucks already available in our market this truck constitutes a phone it in effort. That is why it isn’t being sold here.

      • 0 avatar
        daviel

        Have you sat in a top of the line Ford or Chevy pick-up?

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @daviel
          Yes..no not a fan of the materials or ride. Going by a 2016 F250 Platinum with a 6.7 litre Diesel Ride was surprisingly abrupt over uneven surfaces. Pickup was empty. A criticism that seems to be commented on by others here

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            “Going by a 2016 F250 Platinum with a 6.7 litre Diesel”

            Boy you are cherry picking. You pick the oldest full sized offering that was available, a truck that was replaced this year (2017) by a model that may be the most technologically advanced pickup available in the world. Using your logic I should dismiss mid sized trucks because our Frontier feels old and cheap as i dates back to 2005. The truck you rode in is a 3/4 ton model also…they aren’t built to ride well empty but to do a bunch of work. I’d try a 2017 in King Ranch trim and get back to us.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            ” The truck you rode in is a 3/4 ton model also…they aren’t built to ride well ”
            Understatement. What buyers exist are mid to late 60’s retirees, who are looking for reasonable towing, but not a kidney pounding ride.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            The buyer you describe is a half ton buyer RobertRyan. 3/4 ton trucks are purchased because people need something beyond “reasonable” towing capacity. My next door neighbors for example have a 350 king ranch (prior generation). It rides like an ocean cart compared to my F150 but it pulls their 3 axle 5th wheel toy hauler with 2 Harleys in the back and a couple of Great Danes with no issue. The casual truck user typically does not buy a 3/4 ton truck in any trim.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            Ox cart…not ocean. Damn autocorrect

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      RHD,
      If the X Class was sold in the US it would sell in larger numbers than in Australia. But yet we will have it.

      This doesn’t take into smaller nations of a few million people like NZ that will have it.

      Like I stated, the US market is not large enough for production due to restrictions created by the chicken tax.

      Why is the Colorado made in the US? Because its cheaper? No. It can’t be imported from existing GM factories outside of NAFTA.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al From 'Murica

        So let me get this straight…The F series which sells basically only in North America in any numbers was the second best selling vehicle IN THE WORLD in 2016. Looking at the top 10 lists from previous years will find US full sized rigs dotting the list (but never any mid sized trucks).

        North America buys a positively massive amount of trucks. To say the market won’t support manufacturing pickups is just stupid. The Japanese do it. What it doesn’t support is cynical half a$$ efforts like this. You want to play in the most competitive truck market you have to put some effort into it, not take a Japanese truck, wrap it in leather, mark the price up and call it a “luxury truck”. The US truck buyer has too many good choices already for that to fly.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    Oh My Good Lord, No! High-end American trucks occasionally, actually, ya know, get use like trucks. Nissan had to put a 5 year/10000 mile warranty on their big truck to in the vain hope people would buy them. Will the horsey set who do use/drive full size trucks and bof suvs buy this? Not a chance, this thing is just an affront to good taste. It’s double doomed to failure if it’s a midsizer. Oh, and a mercedes van has zero appeal to high end consumers. Zero. People who can afford a mercedes/nissan truck won’t buy them. Some of our commenters from the mother country/antipodes don’t understand American tastes/marketing. This dog won’t hunt. Unless you want one to park next to your cla.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @el scotto
      Should sell very well here. It already has used up it’s quota of advanced orders before hitting the showroom.
      “CASHED-up tradies have begun placing orders for the first-ever Mercedes ute — a year before it even goes on sale and before anyone knows the price.

      Demand in Australia is so strong that Mercedes has taken the unprecedented step of airfreighting a display car Down Under to give buyers an early preview — and also get their feedback on what they want in a workhorse.

      Mercedes is also trying to target female buyers. “Utes are becoming gender neutral,” says Mercedes spokesman David McCarthy. Mercedes Australia says it has been caught off-guard by demand.

      Price is yet to be confirmed, but the ute is expected to sit alongside the dearer versions of the Toyota HiLux and Ford Ranger utes”

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    This is one time I would have to agree with not bringing a midsize truck offering to the USA. I don’t think this truck would compete with the more luxurious offerings in the full size and also the nicer trimmed midsize Colorado/Canyon and the next Ranger. A well optioned Colorado with the Duramax is a very capable truck and would probably be a better value for the money than this Mercedes. I just think there would be a very limited market for this truck but if at a later date the midsize truck market continued to grow then Mercedes could change their mind. It remains to be seen how much the demand for trucks will continue to grow especially in the midsize market. We will see what happens when the new Ranger comes to the market. I believe it will do well but we won’t really know until then. Recently Mercedes has not been known for their reliability.

    As for the Japanese mini-trucks competing against the domestic mini trucks you need to remember there would have been no Chevy S-10s or Ford Rangers without the Japanese mini trucks. The Big 3 imported Isuzu, Mazda, and Mitsubishi mini-trucks and rebadged them in order to compete with Toyota and Datsun (now Nissan). The rebadged mini trucks gave the Big 3 a chance to develop their own compact trucks. Without the Japanese compact trucks there would have not been a Chevy S-10, Ford Ranger, and Dodge Dakota. Denver Mike needs to brush up on the history of the mini truck starting with the VW truck and then going to the invasion of the Japanese mini trucks. Except for the Corvair Rampside truck, the Ford Falcon Ranchero, the forward cab Jeep truck, and the earlier and original mini truck made by Crosley which were all gone well before the Japanese mini truck invasion there really were no domestically made compact trucks until the Japanese launched there own in the US and the Big 3 finally developed their own and even then GM had input from Isuzu which they partially owned. There are no true mini trucks on the market today nor will there ever be unless Hyundai decides to green light the Santa Cruz. Midsize trucks of today are not the mini trucks of the 70’s and 80’s. The comparison of the 80’s mini truck boom is like an apples and oranges comparison–not even close. Comparing 80’s mini trucks to 2017 midsize trucks is like comparing a Model T or Model A version of a pickup to the original F series Ford pickup introduced in MY 48 with the similarity being they are all pickups and all Fords and that is where the comparison ends.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @el scotto
      Mercedes know that and rightly are not selling it in the US

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Jeff S
      “@el scotto
      Should sell very well here. It already has used up it’s quota of advanced orders before hitting the showroom.
      “CASHED-up tradies have begun placing orders for the first-ever Mercedes ute — a year before it even goes on sale and before anyone knows the price.

      Demand in Australia is so strong that Mercedes has taken the unprecedented step of airfreighting a display car Down Under to give buyers an early preview — and also get their feedback on what they want in a workhorse.

      Mercedes is also trying to target female buyers. “Utes are becoming gender neutral,” says Mercedes spokesman David McCarthy. Mercedes Australia says it has been caught off-guard by demand.

      Price is yet to be confirmed, but the ute is expected to sit alongside the dearer versions of the Toyota HiLux and Ford Ranger utes”

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      A long time ago VW said they’d have to sell at least 100,000 Amarok’s to make it financially viable to set up shop in the NAFTA zone. Mercedes would have to meet similar sales numbers.
      If I had the choice between a Mercedes luxury small truck or a Platinum F150 or F250 or F350 or F450, it stops being a choice. The Mercedes pickup doesn’t stand a chance.

      If Mercedes tries to compete at the low end of the market they are dead there too. All of the domestics make competitive fleet spec 1/2 tons and then there is Toyota Tacoma, the GM twins, and Nissan.
      People seem to tolerate German cars with sketchy durability but no one tolerates pickups with sketchy durability.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @Lou_BC
        As Jeff S , said the market for a slightly smaller than full size ” Mercedes Luxury Sedan ” like Pickup does not exist in the US,. It is going to be a fancy CrewCab in the US, not a midsize.
        Outside NA, this has captured people’s attention. Putting deposits down for a concept, not even a production vehicle , is unheard of. There will be no single cab, low height, very heavy payload version.
        MB will call this a ” Ute” and it appears that will be the case in Europe.
        They have said there will be no AMG version, but if the demand is there they will think of going ahead with it.
        Seems Australia is in the box seat for creating specs. What I gather there will be two stages of tune for the Renault 2.3 Litre engine and two for the MB 3 Litre V6

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @Lou_BC
        US Pickups have never been that problem free in Australia, if they had they would not have stopped assembling the F150 here in 1992, or the Brazilian built F250/F350 in from 2003-2006. Petrol and Diesel Suburban’, which you classify as a truck , lasted one year.1998

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al From 'Murica

          In fairness they have stopped assembling pretty much every vehicle in Australia. As such I could make a compelling argument that assembly quality down under must stink. I would happily submit my old Mercury Capri as supporting evidence.

          To follow your logic, compact trucks have ceased to be sold in the US. They must all suck.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Judging by Mitsubishi Diamantes, Mercury Capri XR2s, Pontiac GTOs and Pontiac G8; Australia could have learned a thing or two about vehicle quality from East Germany.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Todd,
            I agree. Australia built vehicles of dubious quality.

            Australia has realised we can’t compete with the likes of Thailand or Korea for that matter.

            So, we now import from countries that have their vehicles heavily subsidised by their taxpayers.

            Simple arithmetic shows that the average subsidy per vehicle produced in the US was $3 000USD (2013) and Australia subsidised $2 000USD (2013) was poor economic management.

            Stop producing in Australia the savings per vehicle sold is $5 000USD. Multiply thar by one million vehicles sold in the Australian market you see thete are far better ways to invest your money, at the expense of taxpayers in other countries.

            Smart.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @ToddAtlasF1
            Of that list the Pontic GTO and G8, have their following, but we’re not liked primarily due to their styling, others like the build quality.Capri and Diamanté were junk here in Australia
            Ford Taurus, Chevrolet Suburban, Ford Explorer, imported F250 had staggering problems. Lately Chrysler and Jeep are more US built ” duds”
            Not a good look for the US Automotive Industry.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            In the US, it is pretty well known that the Australian Pontiacs were a crapshoot at best. They were among the most problematic cars on the market, and replacement parts could be a serious headache.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            The down “undah” F-250 was built in Brazil, RHD and all. Yes build quality was bad. I can’t speak of the others, why they ended up Oz and or who did the RHD conversions, except for the US factory RHD Cherokee.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @ToddAtlasF1
            Outside of the body the rest were US sourced parts for the ” Pontiac” GTO. LS 1 engine had problems, most of the problems were sourced to US Parts being used.
            Again same problem, US parts and assemblies failing.
            Holden had a lot less problems with localy made engine and Japanese sourced parts

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            “The down “undah” F-250 was built in Brazil, RHD and all. Yes build quality bad.”
            That also applied to US sourced vehicles. 7.3 engine, Fuel Injection and Gearbox. No as bad as the Suburban though…they were piles

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Wouldn’t it be simpler if you just stated which US cars/trucks didn’t suck down “undah”? No, I’m starting to see a theme here. All US vehicles suck in your part of the world, or maybe just in your head.

            Up here, there was never an issue with 7.3 fuel injection, especially in the later years (which you got). But I will say of that generation, Super Duty transmissions were the more problematic of the Big 3, HD pickups, but still a very good trans.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            “Wouldn’t it be simpler if you just stated which US cars/trucks didn’t suck down ”
            Problem is over the last 30yrs, they have sucked big time, leaving the market to the Japanese , Koreans and now Europeans( again)

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Big Al From ‘Murica
            No they have not. Quite a fair bit of building going on.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      @Jeff S – If projected sales are too weak, too bad, so sad. That’s also true of many *global cars* we have to “live without”. But who the hell’s gonna cry for them??

      No doubt GM/Ford/Chrysler had no choice except to re-badge Isuzu/Mazda/Mitsu pickups, right before the start of the Mini-Truck Explosion/Fad.

      But the way BAFO/RobertRyan *explain* it, Mini-Truck Explosion/Fad could’ve never happened, with that darn US “protectionism” and all.

      Lots of other pickups have come and gone. Toyota and Datsun/Nissan have been here throughout.

      If there’s a reason a “premium”, luxo, Mercedes pickup, (that’s really a USA Frontier re-badge), can’t “make it” in the US, why would “protectionism” be a reason??

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @Jeff S
    This will leave yout current GMC ,Colorado and up and coming Ranger for dead. Trying to explain a GLS Class appointed Mercedes Pickup would be a hard sell for Mercedes. What Midsize Pickup has a 2,400lb payload and a has the interior appointments of a top end Mercedes SUV? Right none.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al From 'Murica

      See, this is where you fail to grasp the US truck market. Most US truck buyers aren’t opposed to full sized trucks. This a very capable mid sized truck has to compete with not only the midsizers but also the excellent full sized trucks. prices are typically close enough that you have to really want the midsizers and typically Americans go for the bigger truck for a myriad of reasons.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @RobertRyan – none of the small trucks in Canada or the USA have high payload ratings. The best rated small truck is the Colorado at 1,800 lbs. You add any bling and that capacity drops to less than 1,500 lbs. Tacoma is under 1,200 and the Ridgeline is around 1,500.
      The Mercedes pickup would not be rated to carry 2,400 lbs in our market.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @Lou_BC
        That is what I have been saying all along, it was never developed for the NA market. Fact that the head of MB said ” they were looking into the US Market” was a way of making up for the ” Fat Cowboy”comments. French and Germans can be less than subtle, part of their cultures.
        Must admit I get a kick out they type of vehicles, you see in Europe, but rarely elsewhere.
        How they get Vans to be some sort of Automotive Swiss Army knife, is amazing

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    I think M-B’s US dealers are already crabby about having to sell smart cars, Sprinters, and Metris. No need to make them more crabby.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @Robert Ryan–Maybe so but what has more expensive maintenance that domestic and Japanese midsize trucks don’t? The Colorado/Canyon and the upcoming Ranger will be much more reliable and less costly and the purchase price of this truck will make a GMC Sierra Denali look like a bargain. This truck appeals more to buyers caring more about the status of driving a Mercedes and less about reliability and function. There are better choices out in the market place that offer a better truck for the money. Regardless of this trucks capability most who would buy a Mercedes are less interested in its capability and more about how driving a Mercedes will make them feel. If the midsize truck market grows to the point that it is as large as the crossover market then you would see Mercedes market this truck in the US and those who would buy it would care less about price and its capability. The appeal to the type of buyer of this truck is more in the emblem and less in its capacities. If the market became hot for luxury midsize trucks then you will find BMW, Audi, Land Rover, Jaguar, and possibly Alfa Romeo enter the market.

    The Colorado/Canyon, upcoming Ranger, and the Tacoma would leave this truck languishing on dealer lots regardless of how nice Mercedes interior are. At the present time even at a higher price the Mercedes truck would not sell enough to make it profitable in the US, but as I have stated above if demand for midsize trucks become as hot as crossovers then Mercedes could sell enough of these trucks to make them profitable and then Mercedes could put a 90k sticker on it and make enough profit even at a lower volume.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @Robert Ryan–If this truck were in the US market it would be priced very high, almost double what a comparable Colorado or Tacoma would be priced. The only Mercedes that are priced somewhat reasonable are the new smaller sedans and even then you could get a nice full size Americen, Japanese, or South Korean luxury car for the same or less with more features. The current NA Colorado/Canyon is selling well and yes there might be better midsize trucks but it is much more up to date than the Tacoma. I just don’t believe that Mercedes will sell enough of these trucks at a higher price to make them profitable. As I said before that could change but Mercedes is making the correct decision not to sell this truck in the US. Also the front of this truck would not have that much appeal to many who would be its customers. Mercedes in the US is more of a prestige and status brand and those who would buy or lease this truck would be much less interested in the capabilities of this truck and more interested in being seen driving a Mercedes. Most of the Mercedes suvs and crossovers that I have seen which are few are driven to the country club.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff S

      @Big Al from ‘Murica-You are correct the reliability of Mercedes is low. It is assumed if you can afford to buy a Mercedes then you can afford the higher cost of maintenance and you are not as concerned about reliability. The same could be said of BMW, Land Rover, and Jaguar. These are brands that are better to lease and turn in at the end of the lease before the repairs get to be numerous.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al From 'Murica

        That combined with the fact that Detroit really puts effort into trucks like no one else makes this a non starter.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          That is the reason they do not sell here or anywhere else outside NA, ” Detroits Effort”

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            They sell every one they can make. The F series in 2015 was the best selling vehicle in the world despite selling primarily only in North America. Globalizing them would likely take away from what makes them so popular here. It is a unique market because the US is unique in how we live. Ford builds a truck for the rest of the world (The Ranger) as do the other makers. Why would they mess with a winning formula to pick up a few sales down under.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            In other words you are used to their flaws, they are part of the culture and 300 million have by the looks of it a pretty restricted choice.
            No wonder they sell in numbers

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            So you are saying RobertRyan that Toyota and Nissan cannot build a truck that is even remotely competitive with these flawed trucks? I mean Toyota isn’t known for turning out crap and in spite of outselling the car offerings from the big 3, they can’t make a dent in their truck sales. Boy that Tundra must really be a pile then.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            “they are part of the culture” Toyota and Nissan? Did not no they had a great US History

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        As I said earlier, pickup buyers will not tolerate sketchy durability.
        If I want to pay north of 90k for a luxury pickup, I’m going to get a domestic diesel HD crew 4×4.
        Another issue is dealerships. Almost every town has a domestic dealership. Mercedes? The closest one to me is over 300 miles away.

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          These would be pickups for people who lease German cars. Their single use disposable quality is a feature for people who want to be seen driving this season’s fad.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          Lou,
          Its not about you.

          It appears when your paradigms don’t align to reality you revert to life in Taiga of BC.

          Hicksville BC doesn’t represent the >80% that live in cities with a suburban lifestyle. This is the largest pickup market by far and has many of the 75% that own a pickup as a daily driver.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            And see Al, you are out of touch in your thought that the full sized pickup is in any way too large for those 80 percent of suburbanites. There isn’t this giant groundswell of people saying “man, my truck is just too big” Hence the low take rate on smaller than full size trucks.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @ToddAtlasF1
            Australian ones considerably different.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            L’il,
            I have never stated fullsize are too big or poor.

            This is the perception that has been driven by those who feel threatened by the inclusion of imported pickups in the US market.

            My argument is the US pickup market would change offering better quality and cheaper pickups if imports were allowed.

            Just using the argument based on the existing US pickup market does make sense that a fullsize is far more preferable than expensive US manufactured midsizers.

            But, as the expensive C twins have illustrated a very capable midsize pickup is viable.

            If the price drops 15%-20% on imported midsizers, similar to our prices you will see a larger take up of midsizers and a significant drop in price of fullsize pickups.

            This will inrease cheaper and a more varied pickup market.

            Ford, GM and FCA along with the UAW don’t want this to occur. So the US pickup consumer will end up footing the bill.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @BAFO – Suburbanites aren’t going to buy this truck.
            Every time I go to the Lower Mainland of BC, I’m surprised by the number of full sized trucks.
            I’m amazed further by the number of customized trucks I see. Tuscany pickups sell rather well there and most start around $115,000.
            The local Ford dealer in my town brought 4 Tuscony HD’s (2 Black Ops, 2 FTX) in and still have 2 left. They brought in 2 Shelby F150’s and have 1 left. That is over a years time.

            One more point you are wrong about, look at a Forest map of Canada. Taiga doesn’t extend into BC. Boreal, Alpine, Sub-alpine, and Coastal Rain forest cover most of it.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @Jeff S
        Freightliner HDT’s are Powered by Mercedes diesels in the US

  • avatar
    Ion

    I think they were planning on putting a diesel V6 in these. MB is backing off of diesels in the US at the moment. Aside from the fact this would need a gas engine to be competitive here the emissions spotlight has put MBUSA’s future diesels on hold.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Ion
      Built around Diesel engines , not just thinking of putting a Diesel V6 into one. MB makes a lot of Diesels even in NA

    • 0 avatar
      Ion

      Ugh, I’ll entertain 1 comment even though I know I’m just feeding the troll. MBUSA sells a whooping two passenger vehicles with diesel engines. The GLE and the GLS. The GLC,C, and even the E have had their diesel models put on hold. We don’t even sell the V-class (Metris) with a diesel engine.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @Ion
        What restrictions you put on diesels in the US is of no consequence anywhere else. We sell a lot of them.So do a lot of countries outside NA
        Your definition of trolling is different to mine( waiting for true trolls too turn up)
        By the way MB. Sells a vast number of Trucks and Vans with diesels in the US. You know it as Daimler- Benz

        • 0 avatar
          Ion

          Ah now I get it. It’s feigned ignorance. This article is about the X-class not being sold in America thus our restrictions on diesels do matter. Whilst we’re being ignorant no I have never seen a vehicle sold by the “Daimler-Benz” brand you speak off. Thomas buses, Fuso, Frieghtliner, etc seen plenty of those. Nothing with a Daimler Benz badge, and nothing from those brands that was a passenger vehicle.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Ion
            Daimler- Benz is the umbrella company. Like GMC is part of GM
            No your restrictions on Diesels do not matter, it is the market expectations, much more important.
            Almost all Freightliner Diesels and including the MB Sprinter, are reconfigured European diesels

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            “No your restriction on diesels…”

            Exactly what diesels are “restricted”? Is that what you really believe in your head??

            The US has absolutely nothing against you buying yourself a diesel. As long as its emissions meet specs, knock yourself out.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Or did you mean “restricted” from selling *dirty diesels*, common to the rest of the world?? In that case, YES!!!

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            “Or did you mean “restricted” from selling *dirty diesels*, common to the rest of the world?? I that case, YES!!!”
            US Diesels cannot be sold outside NA, they are too dirty. Exceed CO2 and particulates limit

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            “US diesels cannot be sold outside NA…”

            That’s not at all what you were saying. How about you answer the darn simple question…

            No, you obviously won’t, but US diesels are the cleanest of all. Think why it is small diesels here can only produce marginal economy and power. Proper diesel emissions hamper those two things greatly. I refer you back to the VW TDI scandal…

            Europe has been obsessed with CO emissions it’s true, making cleaner US diesels non compliant. Except look at the predicament Europe is now in. Staggering rates of lung disease and mortality rates clearly linked to dirty diesel output.

            They thought they knew better.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            ” Europe has been obsessed with CO emissions it’s true, making cleaner US diesels non compliant”
            Answered your own question

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            Depends on how you define dirty RobertRyan. If we are talking CO2 you are correct. If we are talking other pollutants land particulate matter, you are wrong. While CO2 may be a big problem, it never gave anyone lung cancer.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @Lou_BC–Agree, the proximity of dealerships is critical and the reliability especially if you are paying a premium price for a truck is critical. I don’t think Robert Ryan fully understands that especially in the US and Canada. That is not to say that Mercedes makes terrible vehicles but their history of reliability is not good. It is not just the power train but it is electrical issues, rust, the cost and availability of parts, and the cost of servicing. Where I live there is a Mercedes Benz dealership in N KY and 2 or 3 in Cincinnati but that is not typical especially in less populated areas. From my own experience I will not own a vehicle that is so unique that it is harder and more expensive to get parts and service. I had a Mitsubishi truck that was a good truck but the parts were harder to get and much more expensive. Even though I have an Isuzu I-370 pickup it is identical to the Colorado/Canyon and because of that parts are availability and reasonable.

    I realize the Mercedes will be basically a Nissan but it will most likely have a Mercedes power train and will be different enough to make it more expensive to maintain. At least with Ford, GM, Ram, and Toyota it is easier to get parts and service and the cost to maintain them are more affordable. If you lease a Mercedes and have a dealership nearby then it might be alright but it will be more costly to maintain once the warranty runs out. I don’t believe there currently would be enough buyers interested in this truck but again that could change in the future. I would not want to own one of these during its first few years of production.

  • avatar
    daviel

    Tarted up Nissan. Way too prissy.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @Robert Ryan–I thought that the Mercedes truck was going to be based on the Nissan? I would think that would have been a positive because Nissan trucks are solid and have a good reputation for reliability. At one time in the 70’s and early 80’s Nissan (formerly Datsun in the US) was the best selling compact truck in the US. Also it wouldn’t hurt to have some shared parts with Nissan to bring the cost of replacement parts down and make them more available. I realize Mercedes has been making commercial trucks for years but they do not have any background in pickup trucks.

    I don’t think a diesel Mercedes truck would sell in enough volume in the US without a gas version. After the VW emission scandal Mercedes might want to wait and see what happens in the midsize truck market in the US. Also FCA is in hot water with their diesels. Mercedes might also be waiting to see how the Colorado/Canyon diesels are going over and what problems they might have along with waiting to see what the new Ford Ranger will be like and will it offer a diesel option as well. For now Mercedes has made the correct decision in not introducing this truck in the US market. Better to wait till the Diesel Gate is over and they get some more experience under their belts with making passenger trucks. If Mercedes does decide to introduce their pickup in the US they will need to not price it out of the stratosphere as they tend to do in the US and they will need to offer some attractive lease deals to get this truck in consumers hands and not left languishing on dealer lots.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Jeff S,
      Initial design was supposed to be. Interestingly Nissan engineers are delighted by the input from MB and are learning a lot about new techniques for the project.
      Jeff It was never meant to be for the US, no Gas engine at all. A lot of MB, VW etc vehicles are huge sellers outside NA, but are not intended to be sold at all in NA one example HDT Trucks

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @Robert Ryan–That might be better not to bring this to the US for the reasons I stated above. Without an available gas engine this truck would not sell in the US or Canada in enough volume. It will take several more years for the VW Diesel Gate to become a faint memory. As for Mercedes commercial vehicles there is less attention given to diesel emissions on commercial vehicles and more acceptance of diesels in commercial and farming applications. A diesel Sprinter van would get less focus by regulators and less news coverage than a diesel passenger vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Jeff S
      It neverhad a Gas engine, so really a non starter. I would not expect a Gas engine at all later on.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        “It neverhad a Gas engine, so really a non starter…”

        See it would start every time with a gas engine. I don’t think I’ve ever had a gas engine not start, in the last million or so miles, unless I left the lights on or something.

        I wish I could say the same about my diesels…………………….

  • avatar
    OldManPants

    Truck articles here, particularly mid-size focused ones, sure bring a Gathering of Eagles! And they won’t f*cking go away.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    Who knows? Perhaps this truck will have storage compartments for your gold necklaces. Less when buying meth and more for going to the club.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @el scotto
      Believe there is secret compartments to hide your stash

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      el scotto,
      Nooks and crannies are great.

      I think the US leads the world in vehicle storage.

      Maybe you would have gold and other investments if you hadn’t squandered your life.

      So, a US fullsize that costs $70 000USD OR $95 000 AUD must have cavities for lots more gold.

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