By on December 10, 2016

Toyota Dynamic Force engine

(Update: Specifications for the 2.5-liter engine have been added.)

Dynamic Force. It sounds like the name of a military offensive from the early 2000s, but it’s also the name of Toyota’s next-generation gasoline powerplants.

The automaker has revealed the first of a slew of new engines that should power 60 percent of its vehicles within five years. Oh, and there’s new transmissions and hybrid components to go with them.

The first Dynamic Force engine is the replacement for the company’s stalwart 2.5-liter inline-four.

While metric displacement hasn’t changed, the wholly new mill adopts direct injection and a host of friction-reducing measures to achieve a thermal efficiency rating of 40 percent (up from the current 35 percent). This, plus high-speed combustion technology and a variable control system, boosts maximum output to 202 horsepower and 184 lb-ft of torque, up from the present 178 hp and 170 lb-ft. The 2.5’s compression rises to 13:1 from 10.4:1.

The 2.5-liter bound for hybrid models should make 174 hp and 162 lb-ft, and return a thermal efficiency of 41 percent. Compression tops that of the non-hybrid engine, at 14:1.

Toyota promises 17 variations of nine new engines between next year and 2021, with each mill finding a home in vehicles using the Toyota New Global Architecture (TNGA) platform. The first is likely the next-generation Camry bound for Detroit next month.

Joining the efficiency party are new Direct Shift eight- and 10-speed automatic transmissions. Toyota claims the transmissions — designed for less energy and friction loss — are lighter and more compact than before, allowing their use in a wider range of vehicles. The 10-speed, however, is only for rear-drive platforms. Together, the technological enhancements to these drivetrains should result a fuel economy boost averaging 20 percent.

Saddling a new engine with an old hybrid system would be foolish, so the automaker shaved weight and mass from its new Toyota Hybrid System II and Multistage THS II units. It also claims to have improved acceleration and high-speed fuel economy. Because the TNGA platform frees up extra space for batteries, future plug-in models should boast an improved all-electric range of 60 kilometers (37 miles) or more.

[Image: Toyota]

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98 Comments on “Toyota Shakes up Lineup with New Engines, Transmissions, Hybrid Systems...”


  • avatar
    OldManPants

    Yeah… almost nobody buying a Toyota cares about engine-y stuff.

    How ’bout more colors and no more Angry Bass face?

  • avatar
    nickoo

    I don’t see the point. They could have made every car across the line-up a hybrid only model and gotten every one of them around 50 MPG with their current drive-trains, how much could it cost now with 1.5 kWH LI batteries and a couple electric motors on the TNGA, a platform already designed for it? TNGA Yaris, Corolla, Camry, Avalon, etc. The new Rav 4 hybrid is their best Rav 4, they should do the same with the Hylander too.

    • 0 avatar
      colin42

      The only car Toyota have in the US that get 50mpg is the Prius hatchback range. All the other hybrids including the RAV4 get significantly lower mpg with the current engine.

      • 0 avatar
        nickoo

        Of course the Rav 4 hybrid gets lower milage, it has more aerodynamic drag due to a larger frontal area. The cars on the other-hand could all approach 50 MPG.

      • 0 avatar
        tnk479

        Accord Hybrid is damned close – 48 mpg combined and that is a big car.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        Is that the official number? I drove a new 2014 Prius from the work pool on my usual 3 hour round trip commute packed with traffic and it returned 58 mpg and I made no attempt to hypermile…

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al From 'Murica

          Source?

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            58mpg can happen “with no attempt to hypermile” if it’s at moderate speeds, no stop-and-go or bad traffic jam slinkies, minimal stop signs or traffic lights, smooth road surfaces, and particularly if the traffic is dense enough that you’re basically drafting off the car in front of you (and in front of that, and in front of that…).

  • avatar
    JimC2

    Ten speed automatic transmission… the gauntlet has been thrown down.

  • avatar
    Truckducken

    Cars keep getting better. I like this.

  • avatar
    zip94513

    Find someone to redesign the front ends on Toyota & Lexus vehicles.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    It’s good to have an idea which direction Toyota is heading in with its drivetrains.

    The competition like Ford went down a different path with the EcoThirsts. Powerful engines, but not quite FE enough. The money wasted on aluminium could of been better invested.

    I would think Toyota is hoping for CAFE to remain as is, unlike Ford.

    It would be interesting to have an idea what GM is planning.

    FCA will be in the dark ages if it doesn’t start investing serious money into drivetrains.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @BAFO – citations required!

      ” Powerful engines, but not quite FE enough.”
      They ‘test’ well. That is all that matters for CAFE. Oh, and power has always mattered to buyers.

      “The money wasted on aluminium could of been better invested.”
      F-Series is currently #1 OVERALL in sales in the ENTIRE USA market. The rest of their lineup is made of steel and is loosing sales.

      “I would think Toyota is hoping for CAFE to remain as is, unlike Ford.”
      Softened CAFE ratings means better profits for everyone.

      “Several environmental groups are pressuring Toyota to cease lobbying for a less stringent CAFE bill proposed in the House of Representatives”
      This was a few years ago but does prove once again that you are just making sh!t up.

      This is recent and covers your GM remark “It would be interesting to have an idea what GM is planning.”

      “It will be doing battle directly with automakers like General Motors and Toyota, both of which are said to be readying arguments for relaxing current CAFE standards ahead of a federal review of CAFE targets scheduled for 2017.”

      I’ve heard a certain Australian say “google is your friend”……. one must practice what they preach.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

        Lou, its like the backwards flushing toilet: the opposite of everything is true, and facts just get lost in translation (which is difficult, since they seem to omit them, substituting opinions and unfounded ones at that.

        Oh, and you forgot how crazy awful, I mean dominant, F-Series is in Canada. Our own Tim Cain devoted an article to it not long ago.

        Ford clearly has no idea what its doing. Their biased opinions prove that.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          If Toyota could buy all of its motors and powertrain components from Ford it would make Toyotas 700% more reliable, 1800% more durable, 10% less expensive, 90% more fuel efficient, and essentially bring Toyota into the 21st century.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Lou, just being the biggest, mostest, doesn’t necessarily equate into profit, as is this years numbers for Ford over the previous year.

        CAFE FE numbers doesn’t represent reality as a highly repected motoring publication (Wards) who would not test ANY EcoThirst or consider one to assess due to its fncked real life FE (15.6mpg(2.7)).

        Remember Lou, the aluminium 700lb lighter (a few hundred against competition) and the 3.5 EcoDud got only 1mpg improvement.

        I’m not in any way saying the aluminium pickup is bad. The reality is, its only competitive and it cost Ford huge amounts to develop.

        Now Ford wants to change CAFE because of its less than stellar investment strategy into researching the best way forward in engine/drivetrain.

        You are the atypical Ford knobber.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al From 'Murica

          Over 22 in my 2.7 crew cab. 17k miles…with roughly 1000 of that towing a 5000 pound travel trailer. No problems so far to include a run in with a pole in a parking lot. Fender, bumper, headlight and surround and fender liner. Had the body shop price out the repairs on a 2014 and the aluminum repair was less than 150 bucks more. There is absolutely nothing you have ever stated about this truck that is correct and it is better in every way than the Nissan it replaced and we needn’t talk about the Land Cruiser that came before it.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Big Allah from Mecca,
            And I can cite many happy owners of every brand vehicle built.

            Just read testimonials. Like all biased brand fans your “testimonial is of little value.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            Consumer Reports shows reliability that is mid pack for full-sized trucks and MPG that is tested only by the eco diesel which unlilke the 400 bucks or so you spend for the 2.7 is a 4,000 dollar option and it comes wrapped around the Ram, which they dinged as having the worst projected reliability of any pickup, Ironically bringing up the rear with the Tacoma of all things.

            It isn’t perfect by any stretch, but the way you make these trucks out to be duds is ridiculous. Ford is by all accounts printing money with them and again, CR had very high owner satisfaction and despite your assertions, there have been no objective sources as you say with exploding turbos and all the other nonsense you speak of.

            I do seem to beat there MPG tests though. I do see they tested a 4×4 though and mine is not plus I think you have to drive these a bit to figure out the sweet spot. But I will grant you that if you buy one solely based on MPG you are likely to be disappointed, unless you owned a Frontier prior to this in which case you will be really pleased.

            But I get it, nothing I say no mater from where the data comes from will sway you. I am of the opinion that long ago you lost a girlfriend to a US Sailor on liberty in Sydney and have hated America since. Let it go man, let it go.

          • 0 avatar
            N8iveVA

            Big Al From ‘Murica. Don’t bother. Anyone at a maturity level to use terms like “EcoThirst” or “EcoDud” on an automotive site isn’t going to have his opinion swayed.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            N8,
            I only use those names because of Ford’s use of “Eco”. Eco what?

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          “atypical – not representative of a type, group, or class.”

          Gee.

          Thanks.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Yup, you fit that description. A lost Ford fan.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “I am of the opinion that long ago you lost a girlfriend to a US Sailor on liberty in Sydney and have hated America since. Let it go man, let it go.”

            I’m thinkin’ a few platoons of Marines, the way he carries on!

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al From 'Murica

      http://www.carscoops.com/2016/11/automaker-lobby-asks-trump-to-roll-back.html?m=1

      Oops Al, looks like Toyota is a member of the group lobbying for rollbacks too.

  • avatar
    JD-Shifty

    No mention of camless technology?

    stuck in the 90’s.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Most American buyers will be looking at crash test results and reliability scores over tweaked mill.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      Well, they care about mileage, but they probably don’t care so much if it is due to a better engine or a better design. But TTAC readers aside, buyers do care about cost of operation and it is a driving factor in choice of what to purchase.

  • avatar
    Prado

    This gives me hope that the next 4Runner wont be saddled with the same ‘crappy for a truck’ 3.5 v6 that they put in the Tacoma.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      I really hope they don’t. That’s just way too much weight for that little torque.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Prado,
      The new 2.8 diesel would be a great addition for the 4Runner, Taco and Lexus 470(?)

      It’s not a hugely powerful engine against the competition, but from what I’ve read it’s tractable.

      • 0 avatar
        George B

        Big Al, the lowest price for diesel is 18.5% higher than the lowest price for regular gasoline today here in Plano, TX. Diesel is dead as a consumer engine option because most consumers can’t come close to recovering the extra cost of an engine built to survive the higher compression ratio within the time they own the vehicle.

  • avatar
    agroal

    How about Tacoma frames not still rusting out early? Although they did buy my first gen back for a ridiculous amount of money 2011. They used one and 1/2 times KBB value + automatic “excellent” cond.

  • avatar
    Gardiner Westbound

    Toyota’s reputation for quality and reliability is largely due to its use of time-proven components. It generally avoids bleeding edge technology. Prudent shoppers will stay away from them for at least a year.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Gardiner Westbound – it is always prudent to avoid any new automotive tech for a few years regardless of who builds it.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      So, they let everyone else figure it out, then copy. Sounds like a proven way to stay one step behind. But, the Toyota Sheeple will still keep buying them, even when they’re awful.

      A lady that lives near here bought a Camry Hybrid before pedelgate. Aside from the two related trips to the dealer for that, she had other issues. She kept quiet about it because she had bragged on what a smart choice her Camry was when she bought it. Oh, its the best seller for a reason.

      Except a slew of loaner cars kept finding their way under her carport gave her away. She kept it for a few more years until she had enough and traded it in.

      On a Tacoma TSS crew cab. Oh, our always-breaking smart choice was so smart, we decided to buy another smart choice! She then retired from her job at the high school front desk and he drives a big rig and parks it on the property, so the Taco rarely goes anywhere.

      She lives 12 miles from the high school, so its not like the Camry racked up a bazillion miles…unless it was from driving 45 miles to and 45 miles from the Toyota dealer…lol.

      I am not saying all Toyotas break all the time like a 78 Aspen, but occasionally they do, and yet the faithful will deny it to the grave and treat issues like pedal entrapment, premature rusty/weak truck frames, etc. as though it never happened.

      They claim the reason Toyota continued with a 4 speed automatic a dozen years after everyone else moved on was out of reliability concerns. So, you don’t trust them to Toyota Engineer a class-competitive product that is reliable? It couldn’t possibly be due to the fact they can charge what others charge for transmissions they developed after I graduated high school?

      They have to recycle the same platform for a couple decades, while you criticize Ford for the outdated Panther, the current outdated D3 Taurus, and GM for the outdated W, J and N bodies when they had been around forever. Everyone does it, its just the stupid Americans who are wrong for it, amirite? Guess what? The D3 Taurus is reliable, the W body Impala was reliable, and there are thousands of Crown Vics still slogging it out in the trenches with miles piling up on them like no tomorrow.

      Everyone has their hero’s, its just time to stop pretending Toyota is somehow above it all because of the name.

      I don’t deny Ford DCT issues, I don’t pretend the 3.8L/etc V-6 was a great engine. Its not difficult at all for me to choose a Honda Accord over a Contour, or a current non-Sport Fusion even. I just don’t get why toyotaphiles are so oblivious to their commonly known faults and shortcomings, as though they are the “master” car, like Hitler’s Master Race: so much better, we can’t even tell you how!! :P

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        I’m a big fan of Panthers, H-bodies, B-bodies, pushrods, iron blocks, natural aspiration, and conventional automatics. In my dream world I could get a 6.2L Crown Victoria with a 5A or 6A

        I like old, simple tech so I like Toyotas and wouldn’t touch most Euro stuff with someone else’s lease payment. It seems consistent.

      • 0 avatar
        OldManPants

        “She kept quiet about it because she had bragged on what a smart choice her Camry was when she bought it.”

        That’s only because she, like so many, lives and dies by your opinion of us. Your prowess is known to all. Take care with the power you wield.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        JohnTaurus is in possession of 1,000x the data that Consumer Reports has a rock-solid model proving that Ford/Lincoln vehicles are 23,000% more reliable and 87,000% more durable than Toyota or Honda vehicles.

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        A potential Godwins Law violation when describing consumers who buy a car due to its well earned reputation as a smart consumer commodity. Interesting.

        I wish Toyota continued profitability and sales leadership in the future for no other reason than to know that it would aggravate your ulcer. I don’t know what compels a person to rant obsessively in an listless incoherent manner about a *car brand* of all things, but I hope you are saving some of your energy for something meaningful.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Gardiner Westbound,
      Toyota did use older, proven tech in its vehicle and charged a premium fot it.

      I do believe that Toyota needs to up the ante to remain competitive. Here Ford (and other manufacturers) have taken the shine off of Toyota’s huge lead it had.

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

    Long overdue. Looking forward to seeing what they can do.

    I wonder if they will adopt direct coupled with port fuel injection to negate carbon build up seen in earlier GDI designs.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      If the engine is equipped with VVT they can use that instead of a piggyback port injection system. It works by holding the intake valve open for a bit while fuel is pushed out of the combustion chamber into the intake port (I imagine just long enough to flood the valve bowl and not into the port proper but that’s just a guess) and washes down the valve both cooling it and letting detergents in the fuel clean the valve.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        I understand what you’re describing and I believe it could be made to work to keep intake valves clean, but I don’t see how it wouldn’t also create random pockets of uneven fuel mixture that would cause emissions to increase. That is unless the engine was programmed with a cheater mode to avoid this mode during emissions testing (that would never happen… would it??).

        All that said, it wouldn’t exactly be unheard of. Some of the first generation Honda Insights had their purge mode when they’d temporarily switch from lean burn to purge the NOx accumulations in the catalytic converter (a lot to explain here, just google it…). Point being, it was a modern-day, certified engine with a very creative solution to emissions.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          Jim, current GDI engines are emitting more particulates than current diesels.

          What was described is called valve overlap. During overlap both intake and exhaust valves are open. This not a big an issue at higher rpm’s. At lower rpm’m this poses itself more inefficient.

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            Good point about GDI particulates.

            I understand valve overlap and its effect on power, efficiency, and the different emissions at low rpm vs high rpm (my nose is quite familiar with the former, ahh, such good memories), and I understand that VVT is what makes this scheme possible at all (by having “normal” intake valve timing at idle and low rpm). What is novel about washing the intake valve with GDI and delayed intake closing is intentionally pushing raw fuel *out* of the combustion chamber. That’s a distinction from when it is a side effect (as it is in nearly all gasoline engines).

            Anything is worth trying out in the lab, but I suspect a separate, part time throttle body injector is a better scheme for keeping the intake tract clean from EGR and PCV crud. (Since dumping STP into your intake seems to have fallen out of fashion…)

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          Oh, VVT should be able to alter the valve timing to reduce the overlap.

        • 0 avatar
          ttacgreg

          You got me going with that cheating comment. It seems just in recent years that ascending steep interstate grades here in Colorado that exhaust from hard working nearby vehicles is getting smellier. It might be my imagination. That said, exactly what is skillful and technical compliance with emissions tests and what is cheating? Methinks there is a grey area between the two.

        • 0 avatar
          raph

          Its already in use on some GDI engines to skip the dual fuel injection strategy.

          I’m trying to think where I stumbled across the idea but it escapes me? It might have been R&T or C&D or MT or some other rag but I definitely read it somewhere.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Raph,
            Yes, the use of port injection in conjunction with GDI has reduced particulates. I even think the 3.5 fitted to the Taco has both.

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            “Its already in use on some GDI engines to skip the dual fuel injection strategy.”

            Ah, learn something new every day. Thanks, raph and Big Al!

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          The best way to keep the intake valves clean is to simply keep the crud out of the intake stream to start with. Port injection was simply masking the real issue, which direct injection exposes. Better PCV systems solve the problem. The second generation BMW GDI engines have nothing like the issues the first gen did, and the third generation will likely have even less, as they have completely redesigned the PCV system to filter out the crud that gets deposited over the newer generations.

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            “The best way to keep the intake valves clean is to simply keep the crud out of the intake stream to start with.”

            Very true, BUT easier said than done when thousands and thousands of said engines age in a wide variety of conditions: at the hands of many different drivers, climates, maintenance…

            Of course the initial certification tests aren’t intended to account for that.

            (Hopefully that latest BMW PCV system doesn’t turn out to get clogged up in service, not to wish ill on BMW nor any other carmaker.)

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      The cutaway pictures show port and direct injection. Toyota was one of the first manufactures to use dual injection to combat carbon buildup back in the mid-00s.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      “Long overdue?”

      You realize that old 2.5 Toyota mill outperforms Ford’s 1.5 and 1.6 turbo in both acceleration metrics and measured fuel economy, yes? Their current 6 speed automatic is also far more responsive than the Ford unit. There are a lot of things I like about the Fusion and Escape, but their drivetrains are a serious weakness. So hush Ford fan. You can criticize Toyota styling and interior materials, but powertrains are off limits.

  • avatar
    John

    What’s the thermal efficiency rating of the current 2.5 liter four?

  • avatar
    OldManPants

    Isn’t it great how little they can make engines now?

    Just imagine that one in the photo as a longitudinal drive placement for the I-6 in an old sedan or pickem-up truck!

    I’m thinkin’ ’49 Ford.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    Al Gore is not pleased.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Seems like they jumped the gun with those new 2.0Ts. This would do nicely with the old 3.5 V6.

  • avatar
    jimmyy

    I really like the current Toyota drive trains. They are bulletproof. I have a Camry Hybrid and I average north of 42 MPG. I drive normally, although in the slow lane. I will skip the new Toyota’s for a while … I do not want to have any problems with new power train designs.

    However, Detroit engineers will be freaking out. They are still trying to match the current Toyota drive train. What Detroit should do is cut engine and transmission engineering, then purchase drive trains from the Japanese. Imagine a Ford Fusion with a Camry Hybrid drive train. I would buy that one.

  • avatar
    Stevo

    I greatly respect Toyota’s focus on long term drivetrain durability but these are still complex engines with two types of fuel injection. I have hopes for the Freevalve technology mentioned here last week that seems to solve many challenges inherent in trying to squeeze efficiency and cut emissions out of engines. It will have to prove durable but it seems a pretty elegant solution.

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