By on November 22, 2016

2016 Ford Mustang GT Convertible

The Ford Mustang entered the world with a 170 cubic inch inline six, but heritage alone likely won’t be enough to keep the six-cylinder ‘Stang alive.

Product information from Ford’s ordering system has appeared online, and a 3.7-liter V6-powered version of the 2018 Mustang is nowhere to be seen. 

According to information posted on the Mustang6g forum, the revamped ’18 Mustang will drop the 3.7-liter, leaving the 2.3-liter EcoBoost four-cylinder as the model’s base engine. The 5.0-liter V8-powered GT model remains as the next rung up the Mustang ladder.

The forum user who posted the information claims to work at a dealership, and a search of V6 body codes turned up zilch. That’s bad news for fans of the naturally aspirated 300-horsepower unit, which hasn’t seen any recent improvements. By all accounts, it looks like Ford is letting the 3.7-liter wither on the vine, recently replacing its use in the Ford Edge Sport with the 2.7-liter EcoBoost V6.

If the axe does come down on the V6 Mustang, it shouldn’t come as a surprise — the Ecoboost motor tops the V6 by 10 hp and 40 pounds-feet of torque. Scrapping the existing base engine will surely raise the future Mustang’s entry price.

The forum user’s search turned up some interesting options for the upcoming model. The new niceties include the 10-speed automatic transmission found in some 2017 F-150 models, as well as MagneRide adaptive suspension. Developed with the help of General Motors, the 10-speed unit listed as an option on EcoBoost and GT models should offer a boost in fuel economy.

A second performance package, possibly designed for track use, also joins the GT options list for 2018. That, plus MagneRide, raises the next GT’s performance potential, allowing it to fend of advances by the Chevrolet Camaro.

[Image: Ford Motor Company]

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42 Comments on “Say Goodbye to the Six-cylinder Ford Mustang: Report...”


  • avatar
    Jim123

    Driving a 2016 EcoBoost high option Stang right now as a rental while my boat anchor BMW is on vacation yet again. The sewing machine drone coming from under the hood is unnatural. They could’ve at least given me some more turbo whistle. At least power is decent..and there’s a boost gauge!

    • 0 avatar
      bludragon

      My first thought here is what will Hertz buy now? I guess if rental companies already started buying the ecoboost there is no hope left for the V6…

    • 0 avatar
      davefromcalgary

      Car sounds are a funny thing.

      I like a tuned up V8 exhaust. But not when it sounds like the car (or usually clapped out truck) is straining every bolt and gasket just to move along in traffic. It needs to sound mean and also effortless.

      Thats something I like about when a mildly sound tuned turbo motor whips by. Lots of turbo sound, a bit of intake and mechanical sound, so you can tell its working but not sounding like basic movement is a struggle. So while its no V8, a turbo package can sound cool in its own right, if done right.

      The EB Mustang’s definitely need a sound of their own.

  • avatar
    vvk

    CAFE…

    • 0 avatar
      rpol35

      CAFE exactly! Second time Ford has done this with the Mustang. Last time was the ’87-’93 Fox body; pea-thrasher 2.3 litre 4 or the considerably more robust 5.0 V8, nuthin’ in between.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      The US isn’t the only country in the world, you know.

      One Ford is about consolidating as much as possible. The Mustang is now made for export. Why have a V6 if there is no overseas market for it but there is a global market for the four cylinder?

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I’d like to see figures on the “global” market for the I4 Mustang.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          Whatever they are, the numbers exceed those of the six-cylinders that they aren’t exporting at all.

          In China, the Ecoboost is priced at about $60k. That’s a lot of boost.

          China has a displacement tax that would hit a 3.7 liter with a tax rate of 25%, versus 9% for the 2.3 liter.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    What was the bad thing about trying to service the 3.7? I can’t remember, valley of death something.

  • avatar
    notwhoithink

    A 10 speed transmission? They just had to beat Chrysler, eh?

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      it’s a JV with GM. besides, it has the same number of gearsets (4) as the 8 speeds.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      Chrysler didn’t engineer the 8 or 9 speeds it uses. ZF did. That’s why the 9 speed is also in the Honda Pilot.

      Ford and GM worked on the 10 speed together. If its as reliable and well-designed as the 6 speed (fwd) transaxle they did together, I’m more than all for it. Aside from early teething with the GM version, its been very reliable.

      In fact, if you buy a 1st gen Fusion, get the V-6/6spd auto if you’re not going to go with a manual/I-4. The 5AT was troublesome.
      I found a couple manual/I-4 Mercury Milans lately. Kinda tempting. One had over 300K miles but looked immaculate and said it ran/drove as well as it looked.

  • avatar

    Bad idea… V-6 was perfect, price and performance. With just the 4-banger and V-8 … there’s no affordable fun (and the fun involves the sound and feel). 4-cyl ain’t gonna get it for me.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      How many 3.7 V6 Mustangs have you purchased?

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      I’m sure Ford will miss you.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      I liked the idea of the base V6 Mustang and I was considering one or a motorcycle. The car would be an easier sell to the wife and since my sons are approaching driving age, they’d love something cool to drive. The turbo 4 doesn’t resonate in any way shape or form with me and I don’t want to hand a 16 year old the keys to a V8 Stang.

      • 0 avatar
        davefromcalgary

        Ive been thinking lately that as it develops I want my fleet to be a 6.2 Denali, a MazdaSpeed MX-5 for lols, and then a good sedan as her DD.

        No kids, no worried on who gets the keys.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          davefromcalgary – I also like the idea of a base model Jeep Wrangler stick shift as a toy. That would be fun for me and great for the boys to learn how to drive. I can take them to gravel pit and let them loose. I’ve already been doing that with my oldest son and my truck. Soft ground in 4×2 with traction nannies off has been great for him.

    • 0 avatar
      WheelMcCoy

      I’ve read that V6 Mustang didn’t pipe in artificial sound like the 4 cylinder Eco-Boost. For purists, I know that’s important. Then again, a V6 is probably front heavy compared to the Eco-Boost, and purists prefer less weight and more responsive turn-in. Ok, V8 lovers only care to go in straight line, and as YouTube shows, they can’t even do that. :)

      I’ve rented an Eco-Boost Mustang Convertible GT (automatic). With the top down, I got a lot of smiles and compliments. The car is easy to drive, easy to place, and when in sport mode and on the paddles, pretty good fun.

      • 0 avatar
        bunkie

        “…Eco-Boost Mustang Convertible GT ”

        This is an oxymoron. A Mustang can either be an EB or a GT (or neither), but not both.

        • 0 avatar
          WheelMcCoy

          The convertible I rented was MY2015 and almost fully loaded, with leather seats, and, for better or worse, Sync3, It also had the pony puddle lights on the side view mirrors and a commemorative plaque on the glove box. It made me think GT, but I think it was the premium trim.

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      I’ve rented all three versions of the current Mustang. The EB may have it on the numbers, but the V6 was a more satisfying car to drive. I have yet to drive a turbo car that has the sort of instant throttle response that works for me. Also, the EB sounded weird, very un-Mustang-like.

      The 3.7 is a very nice engine, easily as good as the V8s of yore. I’m more than satisfied with the one in my AWD MKZ. I’ve driven a couple of MKZs with the EB and experienced the same initial reluctance to move compared to the 3.7. I’m not really a fan of turbo-fours.

      As to the question of “did you buy one?”, The Mustang would have been at the top of the list were it not for living in the Northeast. Once we give it up and go somewhere warmer, I am very likely to buy a Mustang convertible.

  • avatar
    Speed3

    Why not add the 3.0L twin turbo V6 as an option. Or even better, Mustang-based Mark IX? Anybody?

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      If the 3.0 t/t is an option, it would have to be on a Lincoln version. It has been said that it is exclusive to Lincoln. A RWD-based AWD 400 hp Lincoln coupe? Yeah, sounds awesome. I’d call it simply Lincoln LSC. A sedan version could step all over the MKZ and Conti, but it could work if they all appeal to different customers.

      MKZ = Lexus ES, M-B CLA (the gaudy FWD)
      LSC = BMW 3/2 series. Lexus IS

      Back to Mustang:

      A 2.7L EcoBoost Mustang would be a pretty cool option, the one that’s going into the new Fusion Sport and others.
      But, what if it posted better times than the 5.0L?! Lol that might get embarrassing and could cause them to drop the 5.0L. I sure hope not

  • avatar
    Nick_515

    Goodbye Six-Cylinder Ford Mustang!

  • avatar
    StudeDude

    This will eliminate 1 model from the possibility of a catastrophic water pump failure similar to the famous Chrysler 2.7 V6.

    • 0 avatar
      thunderjet

      Actually the RWD Ford 3.7 doesn’t have the water pump mounted behind the timing cover like the FWD 3.5/3.7 V6. The Mustang/F-150 3.7 has the water pump mounted on the front cover.

      • 0 avatar
        StudeDude

        I recently saw a website which listed all of the 3.5 and 3.7 V6s, front or rear wheel drive drive, as having internally driven water pumps. Thanks for the correction.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    This is a real tragedy. The 2.3 is massively inferior to the V6. They should have moved to a SOHC hot-V turbo V6.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I agree with Pch on this one. Ford has looked at the numbers.

    Lou, I’d say the 3.7 is pretty darn quick for a kid.

    I’d teach him to drive first before even allowing him into a V6 Mustang.

    Even a 4 cylinder is a great learners vehicle. It gives kids the chance to understand vehicle dynamics first.

  • avatar
    mikey

    When I made my mind up to buy a new Mustang , the V6 was on my priority list. I couldn’t find the right options , out of inventory. Right , so they did a search for me , to investigate a dealer trade. This was in late August 2015, with the 16’s already in the pipe line. No nicely optioned V6 cars available . I’m sure that the dealers that had some in stock, weren’t willing to make a trade. Now I could have gone online , found one ,and see what I could do. With my life circumstances being what they are, and the fact that I was trading two cars in, the logistics would be a nightmare. I could of ordered a 16, no discounts , full sticker price.
    I settled for a nicely discounted ,Guard Green 15 Eco Boost ,with the Premium package. Yes ,it makes a goofy sound. If that’s a deal breaker for anybody , I wouldn’t recommend buying one. Move up to a GT and write a way bigger cheque. The Mustang is my only vehicle , and it still puts a grin on my face, every time I get behind the wheel.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      there are no nicely optioned cars. for 2015+ the V6 coupe is base model only, no premium/premier trim and relatively few options. I think you can get a V6 convertible in higher trim, though.

  • avatar
    raph

    The great newstate for Mustang at least is the inclusion of Magne-Ride for the rest of the line.

    I took my GT350 out to VIR last weekend and the car proved to be unflappable! One of the class instructors said to avoid the FIA rumble strips as they can really upset the car and in the course of my on track instruction the instructor said to use the reguler rumble strips in the esse. After a few laps I intentionionally rode over the FIA strips to see how badly it would effect the car at speed and it didn’t. The Magne-Ride soaked them up like week old stale bread in warm milk!

    Really fantastic system and in conjunction with the stability and traction control the car keeps you from making expensive mistakes ( on a side note if you bend up the front end sans inner structure it’s 15k to replace the hood, nose, fenders, headlights and nose structure – buddy of mine found that out the hard way on a cruise ).

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