By on November 17, 2016

Image: Nissan 2017 Nissan Rogue One Star Wars

After several stellar space-themed puns and a pyrotechnic display that was out of this world, Nissan unveiled the Rogue One Star Wars Limited Edition package at the Los Angeles Auto Show.

For under two grand, you can have the package added to a front- or all-wheel-drive Nissan Rogue and let the whole world know you are the sort of person willing to pay money to drive around in a commercial.

What does the Rogue One Star Wars Limited Edition package offer? Exterior features include LED headlights, a blacked out grille, black door trim, black rims, and black roof rails. While the car is available in Glacier White, you can — thankfully — also get it in Magnetic Black. In case you are unfamiliar, black is very similar to a dark ebony or coal-like color.

While not package specific, Nissan is also adding pedestrian detection with automatic braking on the new CUVs. They even go so far as to show it in action during commercials, steering around TIE Fighter laser blasts only to stop inches in front of a droid attempting to cross the street.

Still, for $1,990 true Star Wars fans expect more than just a colorless Nissan Rogue with additional safety features. They want the decals, stickers, and emblems relating to a movie franchise they’ve decided to publicly declare their love for. In this regard, Nissan does not disappoint. The package includes backlit doorsill plates, floor mats, and a bumper guard that both make use of the Star Wars logo. It’s also on a plaque found on the door of the vehicle. Not one to take sides, the Rogue’s D-pillar and cup holders get opposing Galactic Empire and Rebel Alliance emblems.

Image: Nissan 2017 Nissan Rogue One Star Wars

However, the pièce de résistance of the entire package is a full-size collectible Death Trooper helmet. That, plus the exclusivity of owning a movie-themed limited production vehicle, provides empirical evidence that you are the biggest Star Wars fan in existence.

Canada gets 400 of the limited Rogues and America will receive 5,000 — presumably because Nissan knows which country has the larger population and worse taste.

At least the Transformers Edition Chevrolet Camaro actually appeared in the film. A person could see it and exclaim, “Wow! Isn’t that the same yellow car from that terrible series of movies?”

So, unless the new Star Wars film has a scene where the rebel troops pile into a Nissan and drive out of the Death Star, the best a Rogue One Limited Edition owner could claim is that it’s the car from the commercial that didn’t hit the droid.

Image: Nissan 2017 Nissan Rogue One Star Wars black

Image: Nissan Nissan Star Wars Rogue One helmet

[Images: Nissan]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

54 Comments on “Nissan’s Limited Edition Star Wars-themed Rogue is Cross Promotion Perfected...”


  • avatar

    Is there a “thank God Abrams isn’t making any more Star Wars movies” edition? Rogue One already looks way better than “Force Awakens”, which I found very flawed.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      In what ways?

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        Spoiler alert: Episode VII and Episode IV use pretty much the same plot! (Except Han dies instead of Ben.)

        Then again, Shakespeare recycled a lot of plots, so maybe that means Abrams is like a galactic Shakespeare…

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          It means either (1 they couldn’t get approved what they really wanted to write for whatever reason or (2 they can’t write and this whole thing is just about a paycheck and some other things.

    • 0 avatar

      An abbreviated list:

      1) A Mary Sue for a protagonist, but I guess she’s supposed to get away with it because GIRL POWER. Totally wails on a Dark Jedi. Makes total sense.
      2) Didn’t buy Finn’s moment of clarity. The guy has been brainwashed to be a hardened killer. He turns against his superiors at the drop of the hat, and is instantly this bubbly, comical guy.
      3) As JimC2 pointed out, a big chunk of the plot is a rehash of Episode IV, just scaled up and given a modern wrapper, in the hopes we won’t notice the theft.
      4) The Universe is an amazing place, right? Let’s start the action on a desert planet. Again.
      6) Chewie doesn’t even merit the hug o’ sorrow from Leia, but the girl she met ten minutes ago does.
      7) In reference to #3, how can there be a “Resistance” when the good guys are now the dominant power? It’s Abrams bending over backwards to stay in-formula.

      There were many things I liked, even the film’s most controversial moment, but overall I was disappointed and shaking my head through many scenes.

      • 0 avatar
        Maymar

        You have to at least acknowledge that Luke was a Marty Sue (gee, I wonder how George LUCas came up with that name). I also wonder how much of Rey’s abilities were GIRL POWER, and how much was some combination of sequel oneupmanship and the previous training they hinted at.

        But yeah, it was mostly to prove they could hit the basic space adventure tropes so we’d forget the prequels (or at least be less disappointed, because hey, we liked it the first time we saw it).

        • 0 avatar

          I get the Marty Sue angle, and I’ll grant you there’s a little but of that regarding Luke, but it isn’t so egregious. They actually make an effort to explain why Luke has some skills–bulls-eyeing womprats in his T-16 and the like–but note that Yoda goes out of his way to warn Luke he’s not ready for his first confrontation with Vader, and the verdict is still out as to whether or not No Hand Luke tried committing suicide after his first battle with the Dark Lord. Contrast that with Rey’s first light saber duel.

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        1) There’s been a lot said on how Rey isn’t a Mary Sue, and every seemingly implausible thing she did has an explanation, so I won’t clog up the ‘net by repeating it (unless you’d like any specific refutations). But I will say this: It’s the first part of a three-film story. We don’t know everything yet, and why should we?

        2) How do we know he was brainwashed? Attempted to be indoctrinated, yes, but according to his superiors, it never fully stuck. He had never even been in combat before Jakku.

        3) As much as it pains me to say it, I’ll give you #3. JJ Abrams is a great nostalgia director who often comes up short when it comes to brand-new stuff. Han is even the Ben Kenobi-type character for the movie. But with that said,

        4) This is part of #3, isn’t it?

        5) Bueller? Bueller?

        6) JJ admitted this was a mistake. Maybe the in-universe explanation was that Leia saw that Chewie needed alone time.

        7) Resistance != the Republic. If you’d read the backstory (esp. Aftermath), you’d know that there’s actually a very complex political situation that led to the arrangement we have with the Resistance, Republic, and First Order. And yes, maybe we should have had a little bit of explanation. But the powers that be decided that since we all hated the politics and exposition in the prequels, it’d be best to have none of them in the film proper.

        In short, the only real objection to have with TFA is that it played it too safe. VIII promises to be more “out there,” if Rian Johnson is any indication (Looper, Breaking Bad, etc.).

    • 0 avatar

      As far as #3 goes, Kasdan helped write the screenplay. It wasn’t ALL Abrams. From what I understand, “fans” consider the whole SW universe to be inconsistent and flawed. Seems like you folks are pointing to the inconsistencies proving to make SW “consistent” in a manner of speaking. I just enjoy it as a story and don’t really care about the details that much. I’m just glad JJ didn’t throw in all the “lens flares” like he did in the reboot of Trek.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    what no pic of the helmet ? I am sure they will not have to much of an issue selling these.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I’ll admit that I’m a huge sucker for special edition vehicles and an even bigger sucker for media tie-in special edition vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      Rochester

      So much for good taste. At least the Bumblebee Camaro was a relatively worthy car, even if you looked like a childish idiot driving one. This thing… not in a million years, nor in a galaxy far far away.

  • avatar
    JimC2

    Do these come in a his-and-hers (Owen and Beru) versions?

    • 0 avatar
      BigOldChryslers

      Who would want those? They were minor characters whom the audience didn’t really get attached to, and they met an untimely end.

      Now Boba Fett, he was a fairly minor character who met an untimely end, but he was cool. Boba Fett edition with Mandalorian logos!

  • avatar
    davefromcalgary

    Wow, never thought anything could make Call of Duty and Tomb Raider Jeeps less pathetic seeming.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Re: Transformers…“Wow! Isn’t that the same yellow car from that terrible series of movies?”

    Yeah, but Megan Fox.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    “… let the whole world know you are the sort of person willing to pay money to drive around in a commercial.”

    This. I never understood why people allowed their vehicles to be wrapped advertising cigarettes years ago, or now, advertising Red Bull or some other product. Apparently it pays, otherwise why would somebody do it?

    Themed-vehicle with movie tie-ins? Well, that’s another story, I guess.

    I suppose a themed-vehicle’s add-ons look a lot better than an auto part’s store stick-on chrome porthole and such.

    Each to their own.

    EDIT: Regarding the helmet, just give me a real German Stahlhelm and call it done. Don’t call it a “nazi” helmet, either. It wasn’t, as it made its first appearance in WW1.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Can you swap those Rebel/Empire decals in the cup holder? In case the driver and passenger have varying allegiances.

  • avatar

    All cars are rolling commercials, folks.

    • 0 avatar
      Rochester

      De-badge. You won’t regret it.

      • 0 avatar
        Zackman

        I like a bit of flash on my car, so I’d never do that.

        To me, de-badging shows you are embarrassed by what you drive.

        • 0 avatar
          Mandalorian

          De-badging just looks like you’re trying too hard.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Depends on the debadging. Sometimes it really can improve cars’ looks.

            I partly debadged my Forester because there were so many badges (five on the tailgate alone) and they all clashed with each other in terms of typeface and design. I left only the Subaru logo and the “XT” letters, removing “Subaru,” “Forester,” and “Symmetrical All-Wheel Drive.”

            There’s a long tradition of taking just the model identifier off German cars. In European markets, the factory will do it for you if you want. Sometimes it’s to hide that the car is a base model, but sometimes it’s to add stealth with an expensive one.

    • 0 avatar
      Zackman

      I also recall de-badging was the custom of mid-late 1990’s boy-racers with their awfully modified Civics – ill-fitting, gray-primer ground effects, huge aluminum wings and all.

      No respect for them then and now, mainly for inflicting the fart-can muffler plague on us.

  • avatar
    JimC2

    Driving slow in the left lane leads to anger, anger leads to the dark side.

    Towing capacity matters not. Judge me by my towing capacity, will you?

    It’s a distributor cap! (Admiral Ackbar looking under the hood.)

    And I thought they smelled bad on the outside.

    The possibility of successfully navigating the new car buying process is approximately 3,720 to 1.

    This is the SUV that made the Kessel Run in twelve parsecs.

  • avatar
    Maymar

    You know, proper Star Wars cross-promotion would be applied to something really trying to cash in on our fond memories of something from the 70’s, and overlooking its mediocre follow-up. I mean, Nissan’s got the fond memories and the mediocre follow-up, but where’s the aggressive nostalgia?

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    I’m still waiting to get my hands on a VW New Beetle Fight Club Edition.

    The first time I saw a Bumble Bee Edition Camaro I thought it was just some guy who put Autobots emblems on his car. A guy in what must have been a brand new one pulled into the I was at IHOP and parked. When leaving I noticed a commotion around his car. Apparently someone backed, apparently full speed, into the side of it. Completely ruining his collectible investment. I felt bad for the guy but hated his car.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Disney wants paid, what else is there to say?

  • avatar
    orenwolf

    Hah, that is seriously awesome.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I still think there needs to be a Chevy Sonic Sega Edition.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Its all in the Rogue name than an actual movie scene.

    Say if you lease do you get dinged at the end for missing trinkets?

  • avatar
    BigOldChryslers

    This is just begging for Kylo Ren and a stormtrooper riding in the back seat.

    http://www.entertainmentearth.com/prodinfo.asp?number=FW1086#.WC8krslW1NY

    http://www.entertainmentearth.com/prodinfo.asp?number=FW1083#.WC8kfslW1NY

  • avatar
    Joss

    Say Nissan’s tv ad is kinda misleading. The Rogue shown is Burgundy while it only comes black, or white.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Art Vandelay: Oh I saw yesterday Toyota was partnering with a Chinese company to produce some EV’s. Good to see...
  • Kendahl: Cash for clunkers would be a good idea if it were implemented properly. The previous one should have been...
  • Art Vandelay: And somewhere, Sajeev is crying over that picture.
  • Superdessucke: The police should be commended for their dogged pursuit of this suspect. They were able to hound him...
  • PrincipalDan: Cougar-ado…

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Timothy Cain
  • Matthew Guy
  • Ronnie Schreiber
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth