By on September 2, 2016

2017 Subaru Forester

Sales of new vehicles declined by nearly 4 percent in the United States in August 2016, a year-over-year drop which followed flatlining sales over the previous three months. Bucking the trend to no small degree in August was capacity-constrained Subaru, which earned 4 percent of the market by selling more than 60,000 new vehicles for the first time in the company’s history.

Making Subaru’s achievements even more impressive: according to TrueCar, discounts in Subaru showrooms in August were 78-percent below the industry average.

It was only two years ago that Subaru reported record sales of 50,246 units. That August 2014 sales record was topped one year later before Subaru set new monthly sales records in September 2015 and again in December 2015. Last month, Subaru’s 60,418-unit U.S. sales performance was 20-percent better than the company’s record-breaking result from two years ago and 7-percent better than the record set eight months ago.

Subaru could sell more vehicles in the United States, if only the company had the necessary supply on dealer lots. As a result of the supply chain limitations, consumers who want a Subaru now must pony up.

2015 Subaru Legacy 3.6R Limited profile, Image: © 2014 Timothy Cain/The Truth About Cars

At only $717 per vehicle, Subaru’s average incentive spend per unit was higher in August 2016 than in August 2015 — higher than in July 2016, as well — but the year-over-year increase translates to little more than $100 per vehicle. BMW, meanwhile, is spending $5,670 per vehicle and is still losing sales. BMW Group sales fell 7 percent in August and are down 9 percent this year.

Closer to Subaru’s spectrum, Honda stands out among volume automakers for its relatively low incentives. TrueCar says American Honda’s per-unit incentive spend fell 17-percent to $1,751 in August 2016. But Honda and Acura sales slid 4 percent in August, in line with the industry’s downturn, and the $1,751-per vehicle incentive spend was still 144-percent more discounting per vehicle than Subaru required.

Of course, Honda and many of the other companies that incentivize more heavily than Subaru also sell far more new vehicles than Subaru. But that gap is narrowing. Subaru was America’s eighth-best-selling auto brand in August, ahead of Kia and only 10,100 sales behind Hyundai. With 4 percent of the market in August, Subaru’s market share doubled the company’s share of the U.S. industry just five years ago.

2017 Subaru Outback

For much of 2016, Subaru has done little more than squeak out modest year-over-year gains. Compared with 2015’s first eight months, Subaru sales are up by only 4 percent in 2016. That’s greater improvement than the industry at large has managed, but a far cry from the 13-percent growth Subaru reported in calendar year 2015 or the 21-percent and 26-percent jumps from 2014 and 2013, respectively.

Yet the 15-percent uptick in August may be a reliable harbinger.

“We will add over 100,000 [units] to U.S. capacity for next year,” Subaru spokesperson Michael McHale told TTAC yesterday. With increased space for the Legacy and Outback and production of the new Impreza heading to Indiana, Subaru’s ability to fill dealer lots with available cars will dramatically improve.

It needs to. Heading into August, Automotive News reports that Subaru had just a 24-day supply of new vehicles. The industry averaged 61 days of supply.

Limited supply didn’t stop Subaru from reaching lofty targets, however. To achieve record brand-wide sales in August 2016, Subaru sold more Foresters, Outbacks, and Legacys than at any month in the company’s history.

Among SUVs/crossovers, the Forester ranked seventh in August, only 1,322 sales back of the Ford Explorer, while the Outback ranked ninth, ahead of the Chevrolet Equinox, Jeep Wrangler, Hyundai Santa Fe, and Toyota Highlander.

Combined, the Forester, Outback, and Crosstrek — Subaru’s three high-riding models — accounted for three-quarters of the brand’s August volume.

[Images: Subaru and © Timothy Cain/TTAC]

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures. Follow on Twitter @goodcarbadcar and on Facebook.

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137 Comments on “Subaru Reports Record U.S. Sales In August 2016 With Industry’s Lowest Incentives As Other Automakers Tumble...”


  • avatar
    Jimal

    Subarus are the perfect utilitarian vehicle for the 99.99% of drivers out there who aren’t car enthusiasts, the market Subaru targets perfectly with their safety and “Love: What Makes a Subaru a Subaru” campaigns.

    In other words, they’re doing it right.

    • 0 avatar
      VW16v

      2017 Impreza and upcoming 7 passenger SUV will also dig into some other auto maker sales. Here in Utah you basically have to order a Forester because of the low level of supply. The dealers still have Forester’s. But they are usually loaded with options. Impreza and Outback sales are also very high.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      What I don’t understand is WHY Subaru gets all the sales? they are not reliable long term, their AWD that comes with CVT is basically same as any other cheap AWD and nothing like the Subaru AWD we knew before.

      Although, I feel, they priced nicely. But would be interesting to see % that are leased.. Ah, it is #1 in buying – 75%. So people really don’t care that so far long term reliability for Subaru has not been good, and it mostly Engine.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        They’ve fostered a “clique” and market to people who want to be “in the club.”

      • 0 avatar
        Jimal

        You realize that you’re speaking jibberish to the overwhelming majority of Subaru buyers. They are marketed as safe utility vehicles and the market is responding to that. I don’t think it is a coincidence that Subaru started selling more cars when they stopped catering to the performance market and went with a mainstream safety message.

        • 0 avatar
          Mandalorian

          As someone with a Subaru in the family stable, I can say this: it’s about utility. If you want to spend between $20-30k, want AWD, a decent amount of cargo space, and a comfortable rear seat, the options are limited.

          The only thing I don’t understand is why people in mountainous regions by the NA 4-cyl ones, they’re slower than molasses in January.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          Actually, real story. Just this week. My co-worker buying new Outback, he loves Subaru. 6-8 months ago he paid $1500 for engine work. I went with him in his old Outback – the interior is bad, rear seat is bad. Only AWD is good – he car had AT. I showed him videos how Outbacks with CVT can’t climb curbs, how CX5 SkyActive AWD does as good as Subaru Forester. Showed him technical articles that AWD in CVT Subaru today is just plain cheap AWD. I showed him reviews that criticize interiors even of new Subarus. He still saw only one car in his eyes – Outback.

          • 0 avatar
            Mandalorian

            How old is old? The new Outbacks have extremely roomy rear seats.

            CX5 is a decent vehicle, but it’s more an SUV where the Outback is more of a wagon, especially the 2016- version. It feels a lot more like a Volvo wagon than the generation before it, especially in the Limited guise, also costs about half as much as a Volvo wagon.

          • 0 avatar
            VW16v

            The Mazda cx-5 awd is not awful. It is the visibility in the cx-5 that is awful when comparing it to a Subaru. And the sales show for it when Mazda is taking $4500 off sticker price to move vehicles.

        • 0 avatar
          jim brewer

          Saw an episode of “Top Gear” where they describe Subaru as the car of choice for the landed gentry, as if that were a worldwide stereotype. ( Apparently rich guys in England would buy one for the first hand at the tractor store which were some of the first outlets for the brand, and then start driving them themselves).

          When a female coworker bought one I congratulated her and told her how much I admired her Martina Navratilova.

        • 0 avatar
          jim brewer

          Doesn’t seem like any deep dark secret. They offer awd for about the same price as a regular car.

  • avatar

    Compared to “volume” manufacturers Subaru is a niche player with a distinct brand identity. Subaru does not subscribe to high incentives to move iron, never did and probably never will; which makes their sales activities dramatically less sensitive to monthly incentives.

    Subaru is in that happy space of selling enough, increasing sales, while making serious money. At some point if they want to move appreciably more units they will have to step out of the happy space.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    The Forester looks quite old and they really need to do something about it. It has looked almost the same since 06!

  • avatar
    3800FAN

    I don’t get subarus besides the wrx and brz. I’ve driven many subarus many times and I don’t get what people get so excited about. It’s a car with a little more ground clearance, trashy average engine, and awd,,,which is a waste of $$$ and energy. The people I know who are buying them are old boomers who don’t want an suv and want an easy vehicle to get in and out of.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      I wouldn’t expect a 3800FAN to get a Subaru. Why would anyone want a car that is well built, good in bad weather, reliable and fuel efficient when they could have a rubbery, plasticky, gas guzzling Park Avenue Ultra?

      • 0 avatar
        indi500fan

        per fueleconomy.gov

        gas guzzling Ultra 20
        Subie Outback 22

      • 0 avatar
        3800FAN

        My Buick regal was reliable well built awesome in the snow and got 32mpg highway thanks. It didn’t eat head gaskets, it didn’t rust and the sheet metal wasn’t as thin as aluminum foil.

        Subaru, what’s the point?

        • 0 avatar
          rpn453

          “Awesome in the snow.” Ha! You need a ride in the passenger seat of a well-driven Subaru on good winter tires.

        • 0 avatar
          Dave M.

          If you have the 3800, that engine has a history of recalls for gaskets, spewing oil, and the intake valve conundrum (several million were recalled just for the gaskets). Yet for a near-55 year old design it ultimately shook out stellar (but typical GM – let the customers be the beta testers).

          A close friend proudly bought a 1989 Olds 88….by ’93 (70k miles) it needed a bunch of electrical and mechanical repairs – window lifts, power steering rack, head gasket, transmission. That was his last GM.

          How about this – Subaru makes the most reliable boxer engine on the market?

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        Have had the displeasure of owning 3 Subbies in my life – 2 from new – one from used:

        1993 Legacy sedan (new)
        2011 Forrester base (truly optionless base) – (new)
        2011 Impreza sedan (used – bought in 2012)

        I would not call any of them reliable.

        The 93 was a horror. An absolute horror. Lived in the shop. Brakes installed wrong in the factory. Entire HVAC system installed so wrong at the factory, they had to have the car for 2 weeks, totally gutted the dash to fix everything. Mechanics said they couldn’t believe it worked at all in the first place. Regional rep came out and was speechless. At 4 years old and just 44K miles started hemorrhaging oil in the garage – DONE.

        The 2011 Forrester at the ripe old odometer reading of 94K miles last year dumped its steering rack – needed total replacement. Also had an oil leak. On top of the required 100K maintenance we had done while it was in there (timing belt, water pump, differentials, tranny service, steering fluid, plugs, belts) it only set us back $3,100. That was on top of the $490 we sunk in a brake service (non-dealer) including entire replacement of rear drums because the seals were completely blown (something I have never seen in my life and was told is common). Yay – quality. We have decided we are married to it until 140K miles – and that’s it – we aren’t going to shell out for the 150K mile service, that can be someone elses problem. We’re hoping the 2.5L NA head gasket monster doesn’t rear its ugly head. The coin container to the left of the steering wheel by the drivers knee won’t stay closed, and has about the same quality as if it came out of a Dodge Caliber. The driver side carpet under where the heel would go on the right foot is already worn completely through to the metal – and no my wife does not wear heels – EVER.

        The 2011 Impreza dropped its steering pump, rattles from all the exhaust shield fasteners going bad, oh and wait for it…yup…oil pan leak – like it’s brothers. Oh and we just paid the outrageous cost for the timing belt and water pump as that one just hit 100K miles.

        Endless problems, expensive parts and labor, we are done. Never, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, again.

        • 0 avatar
          Pete Zaitcev

          Man, I almost bought all of it, right until the complaint about the carpet.

          • 0 avatar
            VW16v

            Yeah, I think the story got away from him and the “carpet” was a good tell.

            One thing no one has mentioned is the resale value of a Subaru. If these cars were so bad the resale would not be higher than any other auto maker. Estimated 5 retained value by IntelliChoice on Crosstrek and Forester is 65%. I think even higher on Impreza. Outback 60%. And I think 65% is actually a low estimate when you look at used Subaru prices.

            Other brands 5 year IntelliChoice estimated retained value:
            QX50 49%
            Pathfinder 50%
            Buick Enclave 49%
            Acura MDX 54%
            Nissan Rogue 55%
            CX-5 55%
            CX-3 54%
            Hyundai Santa Fe 53%
            Honda Pilot 59%
            Dodge Durango 52%
            Ford Escape 51%
            Ford Explorer 55%
            Chevy Traverse 52%
            Chevy Equinox 53%

            Only vehicles that come close:
            Lexus RX 66%
            Honda CR-V 60%
            4Runner 73%
            Rav4 61%

            Subaru resale values are Full size pickup percentages. I personally don’t understand how the resale value is so high on Subaru vehicles. They are not perfect vehicles and they do not have Toyota reliability. Yet, I won’t complain since we just bought another Forester.

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            Picture coming…

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            Sorry to shatter your view of the perfect Subaru. 2006 Forester base model with 104K miles. My wife is anesthesiologist and DOES NOT WEAR HEELS. EVER. She isn’t some booth bunny that Jack chases for his exploits and standing on your feet all day at the trauma center goes against wearing heels, and the fact she walks 7 to 10 miles a day as part of her job moving through the facility – but I guess you’ll call me a LIAR on that too.

            Picture one – so there is no question that is a Subaru Forester or somehow “faked.”

            Oh, and please note that the rest of the carpet is relatively clean, certainly not stained. I haven’t given the car a detail since spring so it isn’t perfect.

            https://www.flickr.com/photos/badonhill/28811452673/in/dateposted-public/

            Oh look, the coin drawer on the left stuck in its permanent open position.

            Picture two – a close up with enough of the surround of the previous picture to tell they are from the same vehicle.

            https://www.flickr.com/photos/badonhill/28811456963/in/dateposted-public/

            Huh. that’s a gnarly worn out spot in the carpet, right through the sound insulation.

            Picture three – gee look – you can see metal – and the gas pedal. Yup, worn right through to the METAL where your heel would rest from normal driving.

            https://www.flickr.com/photos/badonhill/28811452023/in/dateposted-public/

            So, you still prepared to call me a liar?

            Would you like to see the stack of receipts for all the work we had to have done, including a full steering rack, $1,300 for the PART from the dealer [INSERT YOU SHOULDN’T HAVE SPENT THAT MUCH REPLY HERE]

            How about an address and you can come by and inspect the records on the two current owned Subbies. Sorry I don’t have records on the 93 anymore – that we got rid of in ’97 at 44K miles when it start hemorrhaging oil on the garage floor.

            So you going to man up and say, “sorry,” or will the silence be deafening.

          • 0 avatar
            VW16v

            Before you dig that hole even deeper and say that happened underneath a floor mat. This should be a good lesson for all those first time auto buyers on why one should use floor mats. And if you live in part of the country that is prone to inclement weather. Please use an all weather or winter floor mats.

            Reasons to use floor mats:
            1. keep from digging holes to floor board
            2. keep your car clean and not smelling mildewy from wet conditions.
            3. driver and passenger comfort

            I’m not an engineer but I don’t think it takes an engineer to understand why one would use something called a “floor mat”.

            Subaru’s are not perfect by any means. I don’t think they are at Toyota’s level of reliability or even at some American branded auto maker level of reliability. Consumer Reports research would disagree with that point. But, blaming an auto maker for user error is just lazy.

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            @VW16V

            There was a floor mat, it had a hole through it too.

            I had to remove the new floor mat there to take a picture of the hole in the carpet you claimed was made up. Otherwise I would have provided a pic of a nice think perfect all weather floor mat and you would go, “what hole?”

            If the wife had no floor mat there I wouldn’t have made the comment. Right through the Subbie dealer add on floor mat and the floor. The carpet is thin. –

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Where’d I put my popcorn?

          • 0 avatar
            VW16v

            Exactly, bring the popcorn.

            That 2 inch deep hole was created under a floor mat that was not worn down and did not have a hole ? Again I’m no engineer but that is very hard to imagine that the floor mat had no damage. And if this anesthesiologist foot was sinking through the floor mat and into this hole why didn’t you replace the floor mat ?
            Subaru factory floor mats are secured down and do not move that much to create such a hole. After market one may move creating friction to create that hole. Subaru also sells something called an weather floor mat which is also secured down. They are about a half inch think.

            This is like my tires had a 60k warranty. Yet they wore out at 50k miles and you keep on driving them until a family member crashes and dies. Then you blame the tire maker because you didn’t change the tires when metal was coming through before your family member died.

            Yes, I’m sure you had many issues with the Subbie that really pissed you off. But, that hole is just getting deeper.

        • 0 avatar
          Detroit-X

          My Experience Exactly. I’ve owned a few Subarus since 1981, the last being a 1999 Outback wagon bought used with 84k on it. Subaru Outcash. Here’s a summary of my problems with the ‘99, in just 30k miles:

          Bad chassis vibration at 3000RPM.
          A/C compressor fried, contaminating the whole system.
          Transmission leaks, corrosion of filter/body, and in the end, poor shifting.
          Rear wiper froze up.
          Weird, snap oversteer at a certain steering input, like you crossed a fulcrum.
          Aluminum wheels that leaked air.
          Mediocre mileage drops more than normal in cold weather
          Poor cold driveability.
          Speedometer works intermittently.
          Dash lights burned out.
          Power window switches failed.
          Seat bolster’s foam crumbled.
          AWD system is simply FWD till the fronts spin wildly, thus offering no directional stability in snow.
          Rear liftgate handle corrodes and become inoperative.
          And of course that lovely, expensive timing belt (Otherwise known as the ‘Subaru dealership owner’ boat payment)
          …and I dumped at a $8k loss as a trade-in, after four years and 30k miles ownership, and am glad it is gone.

          Subaru confuses “Love” with “Rape”

          Never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, again.

          So what if the swelling population of sheep buy it?

        • 0 avatar

          My wife traded her Outback for an Equinox after the SECOND set of head gaskets started leaking.

          If you drive 25-30,000 miles/year as my wife does and you keep your cars, those Subaru 100k services get mighty expensive once you add head gaskets and water pump to an already costly timing belt replacement.

          I understand the new 2.5s have a timing chain and improved head gaskets, so there’s that. But that CVT’s a deal breaker.

        • 0 avatar
          GRDoug

          You are aware that in 2011, the Forester engine was all new and went with a timing chain, not a belt, and had no service interval? Either your story is full of holes, or you got royally hosed. Maybe both?

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        The Park Avenue has been out of production for 11 years.

        Subaru’s mediocrity continues into 2016.

        And, the reliability of 3.8L Buicks is fine compared to Subarus.

        longtermqualityindex.com/vehicles/Buick_Regal.html

        longtermqualityindex.com/vehicles/Buick_Park_Avenue.html

        longtermqualityindex.com/vehicles/Subaru_Legacy.html

        longtermqualityindex.com/vehicles/Subaru_Impreza.html

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Simple. It’s because you will die unless you have symmetrical AWD.

      Subaru is exceptionally good at selling on emotion.

      Security/fear/peace-of-mind sells, which is why Subaru sales are climbing at the same rate as health care costs. Nobody want to get ‘caught’ in their 2WD car in a situation they can’t get out of.

      Ironically, most Subaru drivers stay home when the weather gets *really* bad, anyway.

      Personally, I’ll consider a Subaru only when they go back to making inline engines.

      • 0 avatar

        Obligatory comment about 2wd and snow tires. I don’t get why you carry around 300 lbs of extra metal and run two more sets of gears for the tiny percentage of time you actually need it; mostly because you don’t want to own and change snow tires.

        These are the Subie buyers, and the reason if you want a RWD car you need to look for it. I’d want AWD in my car, if my car was a GT-R

        • 0 avatar
          blppt

          Another situation where AWD comes in handy is anytime it rains—all these new cars with torquey turbos will light up the front tire(s) with anything more than a gentle prod of the throttle. Trust me, I hated taking the CC out for a spin anytime it rained.

          • 0 avatar
            DC Bruce

            Don’t know about the “new” cars, but I owned a Saab Aero wagon, with turbo (250 hp) and, of course, FWD. In “sport mode” it was pretty easy to spin a wheel; not so in “normal” mode. In addition, the tranny had a “snow” mode with a 2d gear start. Would not spin.

            Pretty much unstoppable with Michelin X-Ice’s all around — except for the low ground clearance, and AWD wouldn’t have helped with that.

            If memory serves, AWD — as first popularized by Audi’s “Quattro” system was in response to the company’s concern about FWD torque steer and wheelspin from its 180 hp. turbocharged 4-cylinder motor. It was also useful in its rally cars, which are driven in conditions where the average user would be well-advised to have a Jeep CJ.

            Just for grins Audi tracked otherwise identical Audi 100 sedans, one with Quattro and one with AWD. Neither was faster than the other, whether in wet or dry conditions; nor with expert or non-expert drivers.

            Outside of a few really snowy areas, AWD is grossly oversold. What’s worse is that people believe the advertising claims about AWD, forgetting that it does nothing for turning or braking ability in any kind of conditions. When we had a winter place in the highest part of West Virginia, I used to see 4 or 5 of those folks who slid off the road somewhere on the way. They were always SUVs. Never saw a 2wd car in that position.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          Yeah, the last couple of years I had my SRT-4 I put Blizzaks on it. Those would let that car get through whatever snow it was physically capable of pushin out of its way.

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            I don’t get the Subie love either. I’ve rented a few over the years in Colorado. They were nice, competent on the highway, and decently appointed. But frankly, that was all. There was nothing especially bad, but nothing stellar either. Frankly, if Toyota made it people would accuse if of being bland. If Chevy made it, there would be comments of it being competent but cheap. So I feel this is a marketing success, much of it for what SCEtoAux mentioned…

          • 0 avatar
            geozinger

            RE:golden2husky: I don’t get the Subie love either. I guess it was all of those biodegradable BRATs and other of their cars from the 1970’s & 80’s that never really impressed me.

            Their marketing in recent times is just clueless. Remember the Subaru graveyard commercial? Abandoning cars in a field. Yes, very environmentally responsible. In direct opposition to their zero landfill commercials touting their ONE plant here in the US. I really liked the one that was going to donate x-amount of dollars to a charity, at least you knew you were going to pay that much more for your car. Or the incredibly cute couple who drove all over the country looking for the sunglasses the dork left on his head. Actually, I would rather watch a Spongebob Squarepants marathon over those treacle-sweet airhead moments.

            Right now the fashion is SUVs, and if you buy them right, you get all the functionality of a wagon with AWD and a good form factor. I think the observation about Baby Boomers is correct, now that CUVs are the norm, these *are* the counter culture cars. To that end, most everyone has forgotten the love, or lack thereof, for the B9 Tribeca. With Subaru’s flying female genitalia grille and other oddities, it was largely a flop. Even when “Explorerized”, it still failed and was finally removed from the market. I guess it wasn’t granola enough for the target market.

            Regardless, if it’s what floats people’s boats, then party on!

    • 0 avatar
      Jimal

      Subaru is doing good right now because they’re marginalized people like you, who only get “excited” about the WRX or the BRZ. Neither car is a volume car and Subaru figured out that performance doesn’t sell cars anymore.

      • 0 avatar
        kurtamaxxguy

        Subaru has ___tried__ selling performance. Ever wonder why enthusiasts keep screaming for but never get a USA Forester XT with a manual transmission? Because Subaru USA __offered__ Forester XT with manuals, and hardly any USA’ers bought them (something like 1% worth of Forester XT sales: XT’s total about 10% of Forester sales).

    • 0 avatar

      Subaru understands marketing.

    • 0 avatar
      burgersandbeer

      “The people I know who are buying them are old boomers who don’t want an suv and want an easy vehicle to get in and out of.”

      That certainly sounds like a market worth pursuing. Subaru still has the WRX and BRZ you mentioned for the younger crowd.

    • 0 avatar
      kurtamaxxguy

      Try accelerating FWW/RWD/AWD vehicles on hills, tilted roads, or while making sharp turns (especially on wet roads) and you’ll quickly discover that AWD provides more traction. Perhaps you don’t __need__ that traction, but it’s nice to have a more responsive car. You’ll also find the reactive AWD systems don’t provide the response of Quattro or other recent full time AWD systems ala Subaru.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Dear Subaru:

    When it comes to your huge growth please be more like Honda and be less like Toyota.

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    Subaru still are the only ones offering an affordable large wagon. The Outback is a terrific value, especially in lower trims. The Forester is also great value with standard AWD and visibility. It’s no wonder Subaru is doing so well.

    Are the seats in Subarus still terrible though? We had an 02 Impreza wagon, 04 Forester XT and 06 Legacy wagon and the seats were pretty much terrible in all of them. I hope for new buyers that they’re getting a better seat than we did.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      My ’13 FXT had horrible seats.

    • 0 avatar
      fendertweed

      I would not call them great (not as nice as my ’01 Audi A6 Avant) but the seats in my ’09 Outback Limited are comfortable enough that I can do a 9-10 hour drive from Cape Cod to VA annually without any ill effects (and I’m somewhat picky about seating, back support, etc.). Similarly, 4-7 hour trips from VA to NJ or Mass. are no problem.

    • 0 avatar
      pprj

      I went to the dealer ready to buy an Outback. Loved the car. Hated the seat. The check remained in my pocket.

    • 0 avatar
      jimble

      The driver’s seat in my Crosstrek seems like it should be a weak point — no power controls, no adjustable lumbar support, fairly weak lateral bolstering — and yet it has been nothing but comfortable and supportive over some very long trips. I didn’t even have to adjust the seat when I drove it home from the dealer, it just fit. Probably not a perfect fit for everybody, but perfect for me.

    • 0 avatar
      VW16v

      Impreza and Outback seats are very comfortable. Forester takes some adjustments to get right. Thankfully the higher end models have memory seats.

    • 0 avatar
      burgersandbeer

      Seats are really subjective. My parents have an ’11 Forester and I think the seats are one of the better things about the car.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      “Seat comfort” is not something one can judge for another person. everyone’s hindquarters are different. For me, most cars where people say they have “awesome seats” (esp. Recaros) I get in and soon find out they’re tailbone smashers.

      • 0 avatar
        Mandalorian

        Seat comfort is 100% subjective. The seats our Outback are comfy, I have no problem doing a 1000mi day in them. However, the most UNCOMFORTABLE car seats I have ever sat in were in a 1999 Forester. Those seats made a weekend hunting trip into an SS interrogation.

    • 0 avatar
      kurtamaxxguy

      The best car seats I ever had were in the ’04 Malibu Maxx: over two hours driving gave little discomfort. The ’09/’14/’17 Forester only offer an hour before my bottom screams “GET OUT, NOW!”. The Outbacks felt slightly better, but not good enough to loose Forester’s view, headroom, and turbo.
      However, numerous Audi and Honda’s I’ve tried felt like sitting on a park bench. Not sure who has the best car seat these days.
      FYI a lot of Malibu Maxx’s are still running up in Portland, OR.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    There are four things driving Subaru sales:

    1) Long history of above-average AWD systems and reputation for capability in snowy weather.
    2) Granola-hip image in places where that’s desirable (New England, Pacific Northwest, Colorado).
    3) Consistently excellent packaging and roomy interiors across the model range (‘cept BRZ).
    4) Good feature content for money.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      Exactly. Here in decidedly-non-snowy Houston, Subaru is going gangbusters because of the road clearance and AWD when the sky pukes tons of rain. I love my Outback. I look forward to their future model which is supposedly fo have 3 rows.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      Good point – their AWD IS! history. These models that come with CVT don’t have that famous AWD that it used to be.

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        The CVT has never been an issue for me. Took all of a day to not expect shift points. In not sure what all of the hand wringing and Internet crying is about CVTs. Actually the technology aspect of a CVT makes perfect sense.!!It is my understanding Honda’s CVT is pretty stellar.

        If you MUST have shift points, flip the gear to sport mode and use the paddle shifters. That gimmick has been used twice by me in 3+ years.

    • 0 avatar
      kurtamaxxguy

      A Youtube video pitted a 2004 forester against a 2016 forester. The ’04’s AWD failed miserably when either side’s or diagonally opposed wheels were put on rollers, while the ’16 escaped them. With wheels lifted, the ’04 flexed enough so its rear hatch would not close, while the ’16’s hatch did.
      Also, another Youtube car evaluation site video pitted a ’16 Forester against a ’16 BMW X1. The reviewers concluded if you want a badge, buy the BMW, but if you want better value (and in many ways a better car) get the Forester.
      Subaru does try to improve their product.
      But, Subarus aren’t perfect: their AWD doesn’t tolerate unequally sized tires, some interior plastics and headliners are cheap, and the Direct injection engines can develop carbon buildup. You also don’t want to buy a first year Subaru, as they’ll have numerous problems.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Let us turn the clock back to Nov 1988

    “In dramatic television commercials that are now saturating Indiana’s airwaves, the Bayh campaign blasts Lt. Gov. John Mutz–the Republican gubernatorial candidate who has headed up the state’s economic development efforts for the past eight years–for giving $55 million in taxpayer money to “the Japanese.” At issue is $55 million in state subsidies and tax breaks for Subaru-Isuzu that Mutz helped arrange.”

    • 0 avatar
      bullnuke

      And the many employees of Subaru of Indiana Automotive, as well as the many local supplier for Subaru’s plant in Lafayette, still thank Lt. Gov. John Mutz for his efforts

    • 0 avatar
      Brady Bunch

      This comment reminds me of an article I read in the Business section of a SAn Antonio (TX) Sunday edition about the Toyota Plant in SA. It seems that part of all the freebies granted to Toyota was a freezing of land use by the owners within a 3 miles radius of the plant. Thus if you were growing corn and a land developer wanted to offer you boat load of money to quit farming you were out of luck because the wonderful bureaucrats had sold their soul and your freedom to the devil so pickups could be built. The author was trying to get the city officials to compensate the land owners.

  • avatar
    Cabriolet

    I can only wish Subaru luck. I hope their cars now go more then 70,000 miles before the problems start. I had one years ago. After 50,000 miles the problems seemed to start. My car went to 78,000 miles and i got rid of it fast. Last one we brought. My buddys lasted about 100,000 miles this year the engine let loose 75 miles into his vacation. Owned 3 over the years now owns a Honda. I think their problem is they need a new engine and not a boxer engine.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      To be fair, “years ago” has about as much relevance as using a Citation to dismiss buying a new Malibu…

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        Naturally aspirated 2009 Subarus with 99,000 miles are now fright pigs under Virginia’s state inspection program. Is that to be dismissed as irrelevant in buying a new one? Malibus are about as bad, so writing Chevy off over the X-cars is pure good luck if you can’t figure out the logic involved.

  • avatar
    BoogerROTN

    Thanks to their SJW marketing campaign, I’m about as likely to buy a Subaru as I am to purchase Liberty Mutual car insurance.

    “So my three kids shot arrows at my Subaru Outback all day. I called my insurance company and advised them what had happened to “Brad.” They told me they were going to raise my rates to cover the costs of repairs. For fifty little dents? Maybe I should change my insurance company. I have drool on my chin.”

    But hey, kudos to them for at least offering a non-lux wagon.

  • avatar
    kurtamaxxguy

    Subaru has done a good job listening to its customers via surveys getting feedback on vehicles and service experiences. Subaru cars prove __practical__ for their owners and are steadily refined. Problems like engine oil consumption get addressed.
    Meanwhile, Hyper-enthusiasts can still get “old school” WRX STI with many early Subaru quirks (peaky engine, crashy ride, noise, etc.), or the RWD drift “fix” from the BRZ.

  • avatar
    jim brewer

    Pretty straightforward: AWD for not much more than 2WD offered by the competition.

    Quite a few value that.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      Do they value the cost of all that (for many) unnecessary hardware? The extra gas consumption? The need to be very diligent with tire replacement so as to not upset the AWD? For those who can use it, hey, go for it. But needing AWD for heavy rain? Seriously? That is the power of marketing; the BOSE of drivelines….

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        Subaru has always done well by targeting the clueless and neglected. They just want to be appreciated, and they have always appreciated Subaru for it. So far as I know Subaru has never made a car that didn’t have at least one flaw that would be considered an Achilles Heel were it perpetrated by one of the two quality car companies. Honda’s 2001 V6 automatic transmission? For Subaru, that would just be a transmission. Toyota’s 3VZ-E? Subaru has never had anything that reliable or durable.

        Even in the early ’80s, when new Subarus rusted out on dealer lots and performed like French cars, Subaru had already cracked the customer satisfaction index code. The key is making sure your customers know cars like like deep sea divers know origami. It doesn’t matter if they’re humanities professors or vegan life partners. Just so long as their entire comprehension of the universe can be expressed by a bumper sticker, they’re not going to know how bad their cars are.

        • 0 avatar
          Kenmore

          ” their entire comprehension of the universe can be expressed by a bumper sticker”

          Like yours can’t?

          “WINNERS SUCK!”

        • 0 avatar
          JustPassinThru

          Good summation, Todd.

          My mechanic blanched when I told him I was considering a used Subi, a few years back – when I had to periodically travel to a remote work location over a mountain pass. My 2wd pickup wasn’t going to be up to winter storms without tire chains.

          Since then, reading and observing…I don’t think a Subaru, new or used, is a good risk. Not unless I can afford to lose most of the purchase-price value.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            So much hate for a brand because of the (mostly false) assumptions about its owners.

          • 0 avatar
            JustPassinThru

            Nope. Maybe by a few.

            There’s no hate here. Just incredulousness. I’d have the same reaction if someone were praising the Wildcat Chinese three-wheel minivan (Google it).

            The car line is mediocre and not engineered well…Japan’s version of the 1970s AMC. They were doing well with four-wheel-drive, too…and it didn’t last, either. Beyond the novelty of a Hornet Sportabout with Rube Goldberg AWD, they offered little. Couldn’t afford to offer more. And so they sold something ELSE, with their Renegade and Honcho and 10-4 packages.

            I don’t see any of that as clever marketing. I see it as a desperate move to keep the wolves at bay; and frantic defense strategies don’t work as a sustaining program.

            And I think the number of people who buy cars because they love puppies and Birkenstocks, is going to prove limited. And Subaru will start circling the bowl again.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Subaru set a new sales record in 2016, for the eighth year in a row. Who else can say that?

            And, Subarus consistently have exceptional resale values. Those are just facts.

            Maybe people keep buying Subarus for reasons others than puppies and Birkenstocks – maybe they actually like the cars, regardless of your dismissal of their motives.

          • 0 avatar
            Kenmore

            “So much hate for a brand because of the (mostly false) assumptions about its owners.”

            It’s an interesting phenomenon, alright.

            Like when bullying the smart kids, less evolved males of any age instinctively know who has the options in modern life and want to get their kicks in while they may.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            I considered a Subaru in 2007. Sales hadn’t taken off yet, and I could get a new Impreza with a 5-speed stick for a very tempting price. Every worthwhile mechanic I knew said to stay away; whether they worked on all makes, specialized in diesel trucks, or restored German cars. From what I’ve seen since, Subarus have only gotten worse. Ever hear of a stretch-fit accessory drive belt that requires a special tool to replace? On a 2009 Forrester? Why do their CV axles fail so much more often than the good brands when each one only has to do half as much work? Why haven’t I ever sourced a spindle for any other make of car? I wouldn’t know it was a thing if Subarus weren’t popular in my market.

            I’m not anti-Subaru, and I don’t hate many of their owners. My best friend’s wife is on her second Subaru, although she had the first so briefly it may have been on its original windshield washer fluid fill when she traded it for one with room for her expected baby. The interesting thing about Subaru should be that they have their own drivetrain configuration when everyone else chooses one of a small handful of layouts. Instead, the interesting thing about Subaru is why they sell to a growing number of people in a flat market while receiving exceptional scores for customer satisfaction in spite of being built and engineered like something from a centrally planned economy.

        • 0 avatar
          Dave M.

          Subaru has one of the highest brand loyalty rates and highest buyer education levels. They must be stupid sheep, no?

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            If you think there is a correlation between highest degree earned and level of automotive knowledge, you certainly aren’t a wolf.

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        I’ve had FWD, RWD and 4WD. During our torrential downpours my Outback has been the best of all, probably because of it’s light weight compared to 4WD. I love driving it in the rain – very sure footed.

        I average 26-27 mpg in combined driving.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Subaru is the successful version of Mitsubishi.

    I do love that they outsell VW in the US though.

  • avatar
    Pete Zaitcev

    I was thinking about a Crosstrek with a manual. I just wish it had a somewhat low first gear, like Renegade. That one offers total 1:18.4 with optional 4.438 final drive. Crosstrek only has 1:15.7. Still… The TrueDelta scores are pretty decent. Not like Prius, certainly, but no worse than Wrangler, and my Wrangler was 100% reliable for 94k miles now.

  • avatar
    JustPassinThru

    I’m glad they’re doing well.

    I’m equally glad I’m not doing well enough to be seduced into owning one. I fail to see the appeal.

    AWD is not a Subaru exclusive; and the novelty of the boxer engine wore off a LONG time ago. In application, the cars, while not so bad as Detroit crap of a generation earlier, are not so durable as other Japanese or Korean makers…or even, anymore, domestic.

    They have the AWD wagon segment filled out; but that’s more default and sticking to a previous-generation’s design language and model templates than any breakthrough thought.

    All I can see of the appeal is what other various emblems or trendy clothing lines or styles offered. Value? Much of the value is in the resale market; and if these things are suddenly deemed unkewel, then that’s that.

    I’ve driven a few – my previous employer used them as gofer cars. For the resale value, no doubt…here in an environmentally-conscious area. The driving experience was on a level with Toyota: Numb steering, bland engine response; automatic transmission a bit more firm than domestics of twenty years ago…which is all I have to compare to.

    At the right price, it would be a fine utility car. The right price is not the price they’re selling for.

    Godspeed, Subie. After the flight comes the fall.

    • 0 avatar
      Jimal

      Subaru can’t hear you over the sound of the cash register opening and closing.

      • 0 avatar
        JustPassinThru

        “Subaru can’t hear you over the sound of the cash register opening and closing.”

        That’s fine.

        It won’t last, either. Studebaker was beating everyone in sales in 1950…”First by Far with a Postwar Car!” Ten years later their very survival was in question. Sixteen years later they’d morphed into an insurance and real-estate holding company and had closed the last vestiges of their car business.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          You sure don’t sound like you’re glad Subaru is doing well.

          • 0 avatar
            JustPassinThru

            I don’t care. And I don’t think it will last.

            It wouldn’t be the first time Subaru had it all wrong; they’ve been through several cycles of boom-and-bust. STARTING with their initial presence, courtesy of none other than Malcolm Bricklin. They recognized, too late, the slimeball for what he was; and bought out the American distributorship – and had no clue what to do with it. IMHO, only the sudden trendy acceptance of Japanese cars kept them going; it sure wasn’t the superior engineering of the ff-1.

            I don’t see real consumer value here. Enough of it, true; but not enough to carry the premium price. Eventually buyers will figure out that the cars rust through faster and develop mechanical issues faster than other Asian lines; and that AWD cars from Hyundai or Toyota are better built and in some cases a favorable price. That there’s no status in owning a Subaru when every hipster with cargo pants and a Greenpeace bumper, has one…you’re just one more army ant.

            It’ll happen suddenly, as it always does when there’s no real value behind the trend and the fad.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Are you 100% certain that you’re glad Subaru is doing well? Because everything you write says the opposite.

          • 0 avatar
            JustPassinThru

            As I said earlier, I really don’t care.

            But I DETEST fads and fashion trends. And when someone is selling an expensive product for reasons that have nothing to do with its inherent value; and then the wags all applaud their “brilliance” in marketing…it’s time for someone to say, the Forester has no clothes.

            A fad or fashion statement is nothing to base future plans on. It’s indicative that the future may not BE very kind.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            If you don’t care, then why do you start by saying that you’re glad they’re doing well?

            And Subaru is hardly a fad or fashion statement. They’ve been here nearly 50 years. And for the last 20+, they’ve focused on selling AWD tall station wagons.

            Why is this so threatening?

    • 0 avatar
      burgersandbeer

      AWD might not be a Subaru exclusive, but for a long time it was close to it unless you wanted to spend the extra on an Audi. Subaru became associated with affordable AWD, and now they get to cash in.

      I don’t see this as a fad, but more of a consistent product strategy finally paying off.

      • 0 avatar
        JustPassinThru

        As noted, most customers who buy these things don’t NEED AWD. Yes, that’s up to them; it’s their choice; but it’s far from certain they’ll keep on choosing it.

        This car line is sold as everything BUT the car and its inherent value. It’s not unlike Cadillac now being sold as an image statement; a brand that is promoted as having value all by itself.

        And that won’t last. Where is Saab today? What happened to VW, the company which sold to the proto-hipsters and granola crowd? VW nearly disappeared from America 25 years ago; and instead started selling another image, with a higher-price tag, just as false.

        I expect Subaru to wind up purchased by one of the bigger Japanese companies and just be a rebranded RAV4 or similar. Not unlike what happened to Prince and Hino.

        • 0 avatar
          burgersandbeer

          AWD has been proliferating across everyone’s lineup for a long time now. It’s not a trend that is going to reverse any time soon. Whether buyers *need* the AWD or not, they want it. Non car people don’t want to listen to enthusiasts tell them that snow tires are good enough. They want to buy whatever all season tires the tire store has in stock and forget about it. I doubt there is a single manufacturer that thinks AWD is a temporary fad.

          I’m also not clear how safety and utility are not inherent values of the car. Those traits are not just image. Subarus typically get excellent crash test scores and offer generous passenger/cargo space for a given footprint. Visibility is also good. Regardless of whether you deem it necessary, the AWD helps in inclement weather.

          Subarus aren’t for me and I am surprised to see them selling faster than Subaru can build them, but I can understand that they do have appeal. Good for Subaru. It keeps the market interesting. Would you prefer a world of only Toyotas and Hondas?

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          How dare these granola eaters buy AWD when they don’t absolutely need it! What fools! They probably think they need electric window lifts and self-heating seats and air conditioning. Spoiled liberal scum! The nerve!

        • 0 avatar
          Dave M.

          Cadillac was always an image statement (except for the real-monied people who preferred Buicks and Oldsmobiles because Caddys were too flashy…); it’s just that for the last 30+ years that image has always in Cadillac’s head as they gave away their market with poor product.

          I’m not sure where you get that Subaru’s are trendy or fashionable in the least. They’re not bad looking but by no means leading edge in the styling department. My car looks like an aardvark, and was a step down visually from the pre-2010 generation. But they made the Outback’s back seat bigger, which was one of their customer’s biggest gripes.

          Subaru is usually late to the party with electronic and comfort trends, although the hook-up with Toyota has greatly assisted in that area. They still don’t have cooled seats on their top models, and dammit it all if the low tire pressure icon can’t have a little dot indicating which tire is low.

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    I don’ need no stinkin’ AWD and therefore have never had sufficient cause to go Subie. Love the Forester’s looks but mere love doesn’t warrant needless spending.

  • avatar
    Sjalabais

    I appreciate articles like this, but why not post a table with all automakers and their respective incentive right on this site?

    • 0 avatar
      VW16v

      It would be nice to see all the incentives at one time. Finding all those incentives sounds like a daunting task. I assume U.S. automakers Ford, Chevy, Dodge will take off a minimum of $3000 to 8000 on a new vehicle. Japanese branded $1500 to 4000. I say that about Japanese branded because a dealer just offered me $3200 off on a new CR-V last month. Audi, BMW, and MB, not sure. But years ago my sister got a deal on a 328i and they took off $7000. And a local dealer was taking off $6000 on a 2016 A4’s due to the new model for 2017.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        Timing plays a huge part, as does the dealership. Right now at MacMulkin Chevy you can buy any new C7 Corvette for 20% off MSRP. Two years ago sticker was a buy. Pretty much any model will reach a point where discounts are required.

    • 0 avatar
      burgersandbeer

      Tim gave a link to a site that does just that. You can also head over to Good Car Bad Car if you want to geek out on sales stats.

  • avatar
    jthorner

    Subaru mostly makes rational vehicles for rational buyers at a good price for the size and functionality. In many ways they took over the market segment occupied by Volvo and Saab in the 1970s-1990s, but added competitive pricing rather than going for premium pricing. They generally do not chase styling fads nearly as much as other auto makers do, and rational buyers don’t care.

    Subara today is what Volvo used to be, but at a 20% to 40% lower price tag.

  • avatar
    Jimal

    Car companies do things wrong and struggle, and this group whines and complains. A car company seemingly does a good job and moves metal, and this group still whines and complains because they’re not doing it the “right way”, which is followed by some vague reference to what the “right way” is in their eyes.

    TTAC is the St. Louis Cardinals of car sites.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      Whenever Jimal writes things, I whine and complain.

    • 0 avatar
      VW16v

      Jimal +

      For the TTAC crowd Mazda is building the perfect cars for the world. Miata winning the best car was the big joke on this site. Yet, Mazda sales are down and down even with new models every year. Mazda is down 12.4 % YTD with new Miata and the cx-9 which has been out for two months now. My local Mazda deals are filled with cx-9’s and I’ve only seen one on the road. Yet, some cannot stand Subaru building good wagons at an affordable price. Some make up stories on how awful Subaru is and how the cars self destruct eating holes into itself. Sure Subaru is not perfect. But user error should not be the fault of the auto maker.

      • 0 avatar
        Jimal

        The free market is a wonderful thing until the free market disagrees with your (the royal “you”, not you specifically) world view. Then the customers are uninformed. Or stupid. Or trying to join a clique. Anything. Anything that will marginalize those who disagree with the world view.

        I like Mazda. They make good cars. However, the market doesn’t care about the things that Mazda focuses on. Subaru has learned this and they’re being rewarded for listening to their customers.

  • avatar
    oleladycarnut

    I read a lot of pi..ing and moaning by those who equate anecdotal stories or “I had a friend who…” about how awful Subarus are.

    I’d be moaning also if I had bad luck with Subarus, but all I know is Subarus are the road warrior of choice in the Pacific Northwest. 20 year old Subarus are everywhere in Oregon. They are everywhere in Washington. Brand new Subaru Outbacks and Foresters are also everywhere up here.

    As to mine? 2015 Subaru Outback. 20,000 miles. 33 average mpg over all fill ups. Comfortable as heck and an absolute beast for hauling and traveling. AWD? Doesn’t give an inch in pouring rain and is waved through on mountain passes while others pull over and chain up. And, anecdotally, my numerous friends who own Subies all feel the same way.

    Yep, Subaru and Subaru owners are just a clueless bunch of sheeples.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    I never know if I should believe consumer reports, that seems to give Subaru high reliability ratings…. Or the owners and forums that seem to be full of Subarus requiring expensive repairs. Honestly it seems to have the biggest disconnect between what you read somewhere and the rumblings you get elsewhere.

    I’ve thought about a Subaru a couple times, used, and I just can’t ever think that’s a good choice over a similar model from Toyota or Honda.

    They seem practical. Easy to drive. And in mountainous region make sense for skiers or those camping in forest lands. But I just don’t know that I can trust the magazines that I could buy one and drive it 10 years with minimal issues. But for those who keep cars 5 years or less, I can see why they sell. They just work in just about every situation for a fair price.

  • avatar
    frozenman

    Subie sales are all about the ladies that will not drive minivans. They have a lighter more athletic look to their vehicles than most other cuv’s and minivans, the bar-stool like seats in the cars make it uncomfortable for FAT people to consider buying them, and that’s a good thing. The higher maintenance on Subarus means that if you are an idiot and cheap you will have problems with it.
    Case in point: My 57yr old spouse (with six figure income) drives a plain 2011 Forester touring with 5spd stick and loves the car. She can afford to drive whatever she wants but is not interested because her’s is “like winter doesn’t matter” and ” it turns sharp and is easy to park” plus “I can see out of it!”.
    There is also an added bonus that if you have to return to the dealership you likely will not get jostled by desperate sales staff and sub-prime tire kickers while your there. General politeness, decent manners and relaxed atmosphere seem to be the norm at our local stand alone Subaru dealer, unlike walking into a FCA GM FORD HYUNDAI KIA dealer that will probably piss me off in the first minute.

    • 0 avatar
      gwwyjjliu

      You exactly described why my wife loves her 2010 Forester so much and calls it the best car she’s ever driven despite it being our most unreliable ever. Her Subaru shares our garage with 2 Fords (one with over 100K miles) that have never seen a dealership but we make a few trips per year to our friendly Subaru dealership for costly repairs.

      I get the Subaru marketing Kool-Aid. It’s the automotive equivalent of the high school nerd, dorky looking, nonathletic but highly intelligent with a sweet likeable personality. When test time comes, everyone copies off of his paper. Two years ago during Snowmageddon, her Forester was our go-to vehicle, and it’s AWD capabilities were amazing.

  • avatar
    turbo_awd

    Good for Subaru.. Kinda wish it was the opposite though (lots of incentives), since I’m strongly considering a new STI in the near future..


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