By on September 30, 2016

Avenir Badge, Image: General Motors

Buick’s stunning Avenir Concept from the 2015 North American International Auto Show will not reach production, but the concept’s Avenir nameplate will be used as a Buick sub-brand.

In the same vein as GMC’s upmarket Denali sub-brand, Avenir will become the high-end trim level “on three [Buick] models around the globe in the next 18 months,” Buick spokesperson Stuart Fowle told TTAC.

Befitting Buick’s Chinese focus, expect Avenir upgrades to first appear on the GL8 minivan, which isn’t sold in North America.

Although Buick has neither confirmed nor denied any mechanical upgrades for Avenir models, it has made clear the central tenets of the Avenir sub-brand: “three-dimensional” mesh grille, larger wheels, and unique trim finishes on the outside will be common across Buick’s particularly premium models.

On the inside, Buick says, “Avenir models will enhance the brand’s quiet, inviting environment with unique seat details, modern trim materials and Avenir script identification.” The latter component essentially clarifies that Avenir models will be differentiated from conventional Buicks by declaring that they’re Avenir models.

2016 Buick GL8

If you think all of this sounds like nothing more than a fancy name for a upper-crust trim, you’d be right. Partly. While Touring and XLE and Citadel mean little to the average buyer at Honda, Toyota, and Dodge, GM marketers have made hay with GMC’s 17-year-old Denali line.

Now Buick gets to play the same game with another name.

Incidentally, some of the same people who helped to make Denali more than just a trim level with a fancy name, Helen Emsley (now executive director of Buick global design) and Tony DiSalle (U.S. vice president of Buick and GMC marketing), are working to get Avenir off the ground.

2016 GMC yukon Denali

There’s still good reason for Buick skepticism in North America. While Buick is a major force in China, the brand’s repositioning in the United States has seen dramatic sales reductions over the last decade, making progress even more difficult for a brand that was already perceived poorly by a younger demographic.

In that case, why does General Motors need Buick to move further upmarket, potentially into Cadillac’s territory? Here again, Buick points to the joint success of the Yukon Denali and the Cadillac Escalade — Fowle claims Buick is not worried about Avenir disrupting Cadillac’s portfolio.

Presumably, however, the higher prices associated with the Avenir sub-brand will only emphasize Buick’s built-in problem as the auto brand for the octogenarian?

“We don’t see that being the case on the GMC side,” Fowle told TTAC, once again directing our attention to the Denali movement. “The more expensive Denali models attract the same age or younger than other models.”

More specifically, “Sierra 1500 Denali buyers are actually younger than other Sierra 1500 buyers, 48 versus 47,” said Fowle. “We generally aren’t too focused on an age demographic, we just see it moving younger as an indicator that we’re broadening our appeal.”

Is it possible that in building Avenir variants of the Encore, Envision, Enclave, Regal, LaCrosse, or Cascada, the average age of Buick buyers could come down?

2016 Buick Avista Concept grille

Hopes that the Avenir Concept itself would step in to broaden Buick’s appeal by becoming an actual production model — and not just the inspiration for upcoming Buicks — were lost in the very name of the car. Avenir, Buick says, is French for future. “That concept and this year’s Avista coupe concept — from which the new sub-brand borrows its grille pattern — have served as guideposts for designers sketching and modeling Buick’s,” wait for it, “future.”

In other words, the Avenir Concept car never stood a chance. The Avenir theme, on the other hand, 20 months after the concept car made headlines, lives again.

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97 Comments on “Buick Goes Upmarket With Avenir Sub-Brand, Toe-Stepping Be Damned...”


  • avatar
    Kenmore

    “Fowle claims Buick is not worried about Avenir disrupting Cadillac’s portfolio.”

    Or Packard’s.

    Plus, Helen could whoop Johan.

  • avatar
    2drsedanman

    The older demographic is where the money is. Looks like it would make more financial sense to pursue people who had money to buy your product. That 18-34 year old demographic these companies covet are not going to have the coin to blow on an upscale car, let alone one with a Buick badge. Follow the money.

    • 0 avatar
      tekdemon

      That’s where you’re wrong, a 30 something year old customer will be buying cars for another 4 decades and a customer that’ll actually return to buy more cars is actually much more valuable than one that’s only going to buy one car. It also really hurts the brand’s resale value when almost all sales are going to elderly folks because not only do younger people not really want to buy them, a lot of low mileage examples get dumped by people who inherit them when their relatives kick the bucket. Which just scares away younger buyers since nobody wants a car with awful resale value.

      Optimally they’d get the more well off younger folks in the door with some sort of entry level luxury product then keep them in the brand with nicer products as they get older and better off. Then they’d also funnel Chevy buyers over to Buick as they become more successful but they’ve been doing a pretty lousy job of keeping people loyal overall and part of the problem is the weird Chevy/Cadillac vs Buick/GMC split that prevents a lot of Chevy folks from ever crossing over to Buick.

  • avatar
    dougjp

    Meanwhile they don’t even have a luxury or near luxury compact car!

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Since most of the B&B knows what Lacrosse is slang for, “Lacrosse Avenir” seems like something that might be quite complicated to do to oneself.

  • avatar
    Drzhivago138

    Looking forward to the modern version of the Electra 225.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    I’ve only seen this written and never heard anyone pronounce it. Am I correct that it is “Ahv-en-eer” like “avenue”?
    No matter its pronunciation, it is amusing/appropriate that they are calling their upper trim level “a veneer.”

  • avatar
    VoGo

    Reading between the lines, Avenir means improved interior materials. OK, but should’t EVERY Buick have an interior that is a cut above Chevy? Otherwise, I can just get an Impala/Malibu/Trak/Traverse and cut through the marketing BS.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      DING!

      Especially in the “big car” arena. If I’m one of the dwindling number of sedan customers you need to give me a more compelling reason than “available AWD” to choose a Lacrosse over an Impala, otherwise I’m an idiot for not saving a few bucks and picking the Chevy.

      • 0 avatar

        Especially now that’s Chevy’s rediscovering its “secret sauce” that moved a ton of cars 50 years ago. Well-equipped, stylish, performs well, all at a decent price. And there’s talk of making AWD an option on Impala. (They need to match Ford model-for-model on AWD)

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          I was wasting some time and looking at CPO Impalas and Lacrosses on AutoTrader.

          I stumbled across an Impala LTZ in “white diamond” with a leather interior that was almost the color of peanut butter and had black piping. Forget Buick, that sucker put most of Cadillac to shame.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            You have been silent about pearl white for quite some time now, I was getting worried.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            This car rekindled the lust again.

            If the Highlander was paid off I’d be saying: “Baby, I think we ought to take a drive to Goodyear AZ, there’s a car I want to look at…”

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      Buick is no longer above Chevrolet. Now, it is just the clearing house for cars from countries with worse quality reputations than the US, sort of a bizarro-world Geo for the times. Where can you see the latest mistakes from China, Germany and Korea? One dealer’s got them all! Daewoos, Opels and SAICs on one lot! NUMMI, Isuzu and Suzuki are the stuff of dreams by comparison.

    • 0 avatar
      MLS

      The standard Buick interiors already are a cut above their Chevrolet counterparts, so that’s not really a problem. Perhaps the new Avenir models would include further upmarket trim similar to the leather-wrapped dash/door panels and open-pore wood available on the Chrysler 300C Platinum. Buick already floated a similar concept back in 2011:
      https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/11/buick-goes-upscale-bumps-into-new-cadillac-xts-in-concept/

  • avatar
    ajla

    I assume Mr.Fowle knows that cars, CUVs, and trucks/SUV attract different demographics.

    A blinged out Sierra 2500 Denali might be cool to the truck set but a Lacrosse with extra gingerbread could bring up comparisons with Granny’s Century.

    I don’t really buy that “works for the Yukon” = “works for the Regal”

    Much like Buick in general, I’m guessing this is primarily for China anyway so the handful they sell over here won’t matter much.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      I don’t think any Denali beyond the Yukon has a lick of credibility. A friend bought a new Sierra Denali 4×4 with a hard working 5.3 liter V8. Previously, he had a Terrain Denali. The only two non-Yukon Denalis I know of were owned by the same guy, who isn’t known for his wise choices in vehicles.

      GM acts like they know why the Yukon Denali worked, but it was probably just an accident that they made the Escalade too tacky for most higher income people who always wanted a Suburban nicer than what was available. The Denali was quiet on the outside and nice on the inside, probably because GM can’t resist badge engineering and thought the Cadillac’s bling was an asset. The right people bought the GMC, and the Yukon Denali became Detroit’s Land Cruiser. GM responded by blinging out everything in the GMC line and slapping Denali badges. Broken clocks are better at their jobs.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I think Regency Elite would’ve been more appropriate.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Hey, Corey, I saw this car the other day and thought of you…

      https://www.cars.com/vehicledetail/detail/680702264/overview/

      Totally cherry old DeVille.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Very nice indeed, the interior looks brand new! Pity it’s got the N* curse. I think those have got to be my least favorite wheels for that model.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          I have a bizarre craving for this car…how long before the engine sadness sets in, assuming the thing is a creampuff?

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            It could happen at any moment, unless it’s been fixed already. I’d say normally between 100-140k miles. 28 might have a more exact figure there.

            Honestly there are only a couple of acceptable N* circumstances.
            1) Head bolts fixed properly with paperwork and documentation.
            2) 06+ DTS or STS.

            That price is too high, if you’re seriously considering K-body DeVille. Look around more!

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Yeah, it appears to be a high price, but that car is REALLY nice…even nicer in person. If I had a few grand cash, I’d make an offer.

            As it is, more looking around a good zero-out-of-pocket lease at this point, which I’ll be doing once the ex is off my payroll in a few months.

            And after six years of driving an old LeSabre, I’m ready for something that doesn’t say “b*tch, please” every time you try to drive it even remotely quickly. Still, that Caddy is brougham-tastic.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Freed, here’s a true story. Three and a half years ago I had junked my beloved Audi and was in search of a new headache, I was presented two older automobiles: a MY99 Cadillac DeVille D’Elegance/49K for $5,000 and an MY93 Volvo 244/150K for $2,000 which was marked down from $2,500. Both were of recent inspection and were close to “front line ready”, and I was very intrigued with the DeVille. This example was dove grey, full carriage roof with opera lamp, newer Vogue tires, moonroof, immaculate interior, and belonged to a 94 old mother who was being put in a home by her daughter. I thought 5 was steep but the example was about as close to extra clean an MY99 is going to get outside of a collector or museum example. The issue of course was… Northstar.

            The Northstar prior to about 2005 is junk. All of them. Visit a pick and pull and you will see them in droves, vs Townies which are well worn when they hit the yard. There is a “fix” which supposedly works to mitigate the design issue which involves removing the motor completely from the engine bay, and my price for my guy’s Northstar guy to do it was $3K all in. So I said to my guy (who was essentially just wholesaling it for the daughter for a small fee) can she come off of 5 because I don’t want to be 8 into what essentially is an immaculate $3,000 car at best a year or two down the road. She refused to budge during the subsequent cell phone conversation he had with her, so I passed and bought the Volvo. I still have the Volvo, which is a tank, and I refuse to part with it. That dove grey Cadillac? I saw it about two years later at the shop. Evidently my guy found a buyer at 5 who had a similar but rattier example DeVille which was in the shop when he purchased the dove grey ’99. Essentially this buyer liked the K-body Northstar so much he would buy one and simply drive it until the motor blew. I don’t recall the reasoning this particular Deville was in the shop that day, but it wasn’t in for inspection and I haven’t seen it there since.

            So these are my thoughts. You love the K-body Northstar Deville? Be prepared to do the “fix” to the motor which will run you several Gs out of pocket unless you find one with documentation. The example you cited has 25K more miles and has aged a further three years than the example I was offered at 5. Therefore it is at least 2,500 overpriced at the gate, and is still probably tip top worth 2,5-3, and in reality might bring 1,500 at many auctions (edit: I can just hear voices arguing with me about the nuances of pricing in different regions, but I say an old car is an old car everywhere, we’re not talking West Coast MY14s vs East Coast 16s ). Why? Northstar *will* fail, and nobody wants these anymore. So if you must have one, find a clean one and low ball bearing in mind the additional fix investment.

            What I would personally do right now in your shoes is call Flybrian on this MY97 he has:

            http://www.motorsportsflorida.com/1997-Cadillac-DeVille/Used-Car/PalmHarbor-FL/7905747/Details.aspx

            Why?

            He’s not going to screw you on the car.

            He’s not going to force you to take it at $4,999.

            This is a Florida car so *no rust*.

            FB has some known history on this example as it belonged to one of his friends IIRC.

            If you love the K-body and can acquire a clean example at reasonable money, the “fix” coming later won’t bankrupt you and you’ll have a nice Sunday car. But as for the ’99 you cited at 7,5 and no history? Run.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            See? I told you he would have more info. Lol.

            Also, keep in mind you CAN find a clean K-body 4.9 from 94-95, it just has the older and pointy front end on it (a 28 favorite).

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            That thing is priced deep into WTF territory.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Apparently you have to watch out for the HVAC system though.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I should imagine the 94 and 95 have even more complex electronic climate controls than the 93 does.

            But at least they’d be on R134, which would have made fixing my problem for a reasonable amount of money possible.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Eh I don’t think its much more complex, I’d wager its the same system with a different user interface since it sits in the dash cluster and not the “information center” area.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            It’s got that passenger door mount temp control thingy too. And probably more complex actuators for zones, I bet.

            Edit: I really dislike that on the ’93 there’s no level control for face/feet. You may have all vents with or without AC, or defrost. That’s all.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            That HVAC control came out in MY85, I’m actually almost certain they are interchangeable between all of those MYs. I’m not sure on the newer ones.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Aww and used in the Audi 5000 as well, just with rearranged buttons. That climate control has been with me throughout life!

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            See, this is why I read this site.

            Thanks, 28…

            …and Corey, too…

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Np, anytime Freed.

  • avatar
    rpol35

    “The latter component essentially clarifies that Avenir models will be differentiated from conventional Buicks by declaring that they’re Avenir models.”

    What a load!

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    So they named their upscale trim line.

    Okey dokey.

    • 0 avatar
      Paragon

      Yes, sub-brand sounds entirely inaccurate, when they are speaking of a trim package. Or, as you correctly said, their upscale trim line. But, they are merely trying to generate some buzz for their cars which, sadly, seem to be over-looked by so many car shoppers. I’ve actually kinda liked both the Regal and the Verano. And, the all-new Lacrosse looks quite nice. Certainly better than the last one.

  • avatar
    Roberto Esponja

    Great, a name that sounds like “to come” in Spanish. Don’t these marketing people ever do any research?

  • avatar
    kogashiwa

    I don’t see this working at all. High-end trucks are already a status symbol and the Denali brand is the best way to inform everyone else stuck in traffic with you that you have more money than they do.

    Anyone looking at a Buick that wanted to make that statement would just buy a Cadillac instead. I suspect a lot of Buick buyers could easily afford a Cadillac but get Buick specifically *not* to make that statement.

    • 0 avatar
      Paragon

      Very much agree with your second paragraph. Not everybody wants something seen as ostentatious.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        My issues with Denali (and by extension the Escalade) along the way have centered around the forced larger engine (the 6.0 or 6.3 IIRC), mandatory AWD rather than simpler and more efficient auto 4×4, and required air suspension which is big money down the road*.

        *These things may not apply to the Sierra Denali, I’m not sure.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          In their defense, Cadillac’s air suspensions seem to be holding up better than Lincoln’s air suspensions (judging by a sampling of the hoopties I see regularly.)

          Being upset about the larger engine and standard AWD falls into the category of: “If you have to ask the price, you can’t afford it.”

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I’m not necessarily upset by those things, but I see them as unnecessary. I want the styling/trim/leather, just not the bigger engine stuff. It’s already plenty wasteful with 5.3 and 4×4.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            Yeah but that 6+ liter beast is what makes the Escalade worthy of comparison to the big block Caddy’s of yore. :-)

            I saw a short wheelbase 2004-2006 model in traffic yesterday and it was clean and well maintained. It made me think that Escalades will someday have a following with enthusiasts like the 1965 to 1970 Sedan de Villes.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            How did you know it wasn’t an 02-03? I wasn’t aware of any visible exterior changes between 02-06.

            I saw the same super clean black one with gold emblems that I had seen a few months ago (at a gas station), and in a similar location. It’s always spotless, and had the same license plate of WALTON4. On the sides, there’s custom gold initials script on the driver’s door like an old Fleetwood! This time I ended up right behind it.

            And when it turned off into a local business, I saw the reason why it was 4th in the fleet. There were trucks in the parking lot bearing Walton Distribution Inc. signage.

          • 0 avatar
            shaker

            “WALTON4”

            Probably because “TAXDED4” was already taken?

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Today (no joke) I got to see what WALTON5 is.

            It’s a dark blue XK8 Coupe.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Someone who leases a Denali isn’t going to care about long term durability.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Durability is reflected in residual values, so in a way leasers do benefit. This is why leasing costs on Hondas and Toyotas are so low.

        • 0 avatar
          SC5door

          It sure the hell doesn’t apply to the Terrain— 2.4L and FWD for $35K.

  • avatar

    The most important GM brand to protect is CHEVROLET.

    For years, Ford has enjoyed a more premium reputation in the marketplace, at least in part because Ford offered more premium models of its vehicles than Chevy.

    True, that strategy made Mercury redundant, and so it was killed.

    But until just the last decade, Chevy had to stay downmarket to protect the other marques in the GM portfolio. Despite once having had a flavor all its own, proof of which can be seen at any car show or cruise night.

    A flavor neglected for the better part of 35 years.

    Now, the current Impala and some of Chevy’s pickup/SUV lines offer models that can stand head-to-head with the more premium Ford offerings. Offering AWD in their car lines as Ford and Buick do would also help take Chevy upmarket, where it can best compete with Ford, Dodge, Toyota, Honda et.al.

    Buick, as it is, needs to stay upmarket enough to stay out of Chevy’s way. And if an Avenir sub-brand – which frankly, I’m not too comfortable with – takes Buick into Cadillac territory…

    …then maybe it’s Cadillac that needs to react by going further upmarket.

    Remember Chevrolet represents most of GM’s NA volume, around 70% in the US.

    Also remember that Cadillac is arguably operating in Buick territory NOW.

    50 years ago, Buick was the doctor’s/lawyer’s car. Enough style and panache to make a premium statement…but still not a Cadillac. Because Cadillac used to play – and win – in Rolls-Royce’s league.

    Wanna bring the average purchasing age down, Buick? Build stuff people drool over. Build the Avenir/Avista concepts and sprinkle some of that fairy dust on your crossovers.

    Or maybe don’t. Maybe make Buick/Avenir the car line and rebrand all crossovers GMC. You’re selling both in most every Buick store anyway. Define those brands more clearly, then move Cadillac further up the ladder.

    Leave Chevrolet as the “all-things-to-most-people” brand, like Ford and Toyota. Resist the temptation to take Buick places where it should not go, just because BMW and Mercedes are.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      “True, that strategy made Mercury redundant…”

      I’d say Mercury was redundant for decades before it got axed. Lincoln has been downmarket of Cadillac for a long time too, so the mix was wrong. Buick has always been a far more viable brand, even in the Dark Years.

  • avatar
    Snail Kite

    Name sounds like a brand of orthopedic shoes for the elderly.

  • avatar
    npaladin2000

    Wasn’t GM just forced to eliminate brands at bankruptcy-point? Now they’re trying to do an end-run and create a new one? Yay, more brands in more places, self cannibalization, let the bailout commence? In other words, here we go again.

  • avatar
    RHD

    “Avenir” is French for “Future”. I guess it sounds sophisticated and European enough to impress the Chinese.

    Unsubstantiated speculation indicates the following models will soon be availabile in China:

    Avenir Ferraille
    Avenir Secouer
    Avenir Ablette

  • avatar
    Acd

    Apparently the people at Buick forgot that Americans don’t buy cars with names they can’t pronounce or are easily mispronounced.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I wonder if they could combine the trim name with some kind of special buying experience, ala Lincoln Black Label.

    Might be an interesting marketing tack…not-so-expensive cars with expensive perks.

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    This is not a bad strategy per-se. For comparison, Lexus does pretty good with its F-Sport model/trim, and this is a similar move. It will acquire some cache among Buick fans but earn zero attention anywhere else, least of all the cross-shoppers they are trying to capture. Bottom line – build stuff like Avista and Avenir, better more interesting cars.

  • avatar
    Whatnext

    “Sierra 1500 Denali buyers are actually younger than other Sierra 1500 buyers, 48 versus 47,” said Fowle

    Wow, that’s a huge whopping difference. Thanks for highlighting that!

  • avatar
    MoparDave

    Hmmm…..Avenir. May as well just rename them Buick,but what to do about the non-Avenir models? Maybe if they tool up some new grilles. Yeah-new grilles! Maybe one with a split grille motif! Hmmm-now for a name (can’t call ’em Buick anymore). Hey-let’s bring back Pontiac!
    Seriously, though-with GM axing Pontiac and putting in all sorts of vehicles under the Buick nameplate, I always felt that they really should’ve kept Pontiac and not diluted the Buick nameplate. Most of Buick’s line appear to be one grille change away from being Pontiacs.

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    Well, if they’re just going to go with names instead of all new models, why not a LeSabre trim, or Park Avenue trim for the LaCrosse, or a Special, or Century trim, or a Wildcat or Electra or Roadmaster trim, or even a brougham. They’ll just be going back to what GM did in the 1950s, with one base car and separate names for various trims.

  • avatar
    Johnster

    Out in flyover country, where GM has shut down most of the small number of remaining small Cadillac dealers (and is trying to shut down the few that remain), it makes sense to have something expensive for rich old people to buy.

    The Lincoln, Chrysler/Jeep and and GMC/Buick dealers are doing a good business absorbing former Cadillac owners and if Buick can pinch a few more of them with an Avenir, good for them.

    • 0 avatar
      Truckducken

      Yup, these’ll look good in the assisted living parking lot.

      • 0 avatar
        Kenmore

        Tell us your secret for backwards aging!

        *realizes he’s too late*

        Well, whose little boy are you?!

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        that doesn’t really make any sense; people in assisted living can no longer drive.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          @jimz: that doesn’t really make any sense; people in assisted living can no longer drive.

          Near me, there is a combined independent/assisted living facility. The independent side does have parking and cars. It’s a really nice place and I think upper income. Looks kind of like a business class hotel. It’s sort of similar to Henry Ford Village near you.

          You’d think that people in assisted living facilities wouldn’t drive, but there is this story:

          http://www.mercurynews.com/2016/09/28/paralyzed-former-indy-driver-gets-first-driverless-car-license/

        • 0 avatar
          thattruthguy

          Assisted living isn’t an automatic indicator of disability. An assisted living facility may simply start by providing a room, suite, cottage, etc. with housekeeping, meals, etc. and on-site support staff.

          • 0 avatar
            Kenmore

            This. And often the assisted living facility is adjacent or very close to a more intensive care/hospice one owned and managed by the same consortium.

            The sense of being smoothly and sequentially ushered to the grave is not lost on anyone and there can be shuttling between the two buildings as temporary needs require until those needs are terminal.

            It’s kind of like a ballplayer dropping to and returning from the minors until he can’t come back again.

            But, damn, the better-off folks in the assisted-only part sure can bring some sweet rides with them.

  • avatar
    seanx37

    Why aren’t they selling that minivan here? They could move some of those.


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