By on November 5, 2015

11-12-07-lexus-ct-200h-in-china

Lexus won’t be building cars in China anytime soon due the automaker’s concerns regarding production quality, Bloomberg reported Thursday.

“There’s too much quality risk in China to produce there,” said Takashi Yamamoto, executive vice president of Lexus International.

Did you hear that mic drop? Hello? Anyone there?

Toyota’s luxury division, which is one of very few automakers to eschew production in China, could prolong “pricing disadvantages relative to locally produced German luxury cars,” said the report. BMW, Mercedes-Benz and Audi produce cars in China in partnership with Chinese manufacturers.

According to Bloomberg, that makes the Lexus IS sedan about 30 percent more expensive than a comparable BMW 3-Series, and 35 percent more expensive than an Audi A4 in China.

However, Bloomberg tries to play the other side of the coin for a moment with this graph:

-1x-1

That’s right! It’s the J.D. Power Initial Quality survey rearing its ugly head, showing that Chinese cars have a better perceived initial quality than those sold in the United States. Or does it?

“It doesn’t necessarily mean that China vehicles have better quality, but it shows the competitiveness of the China-produced vehicles,” Geoff Broderick, an automotive analyst for J.D. Power, wrote in an e-mail.

While Geoff Broderick does his best to curb Bloomberg’s enthusiasm, the rationale provided doesn’t really explain the truth behind the numbers.

That truth: Cars sold in America are more technologically advanced, on average, than cars sold in China, and people buying cars in America have issues using all that new tech.

It also doesn’t take into account the main flaw of J.D. Power’s IQS numbers: all problems are treated equally — whether they are perceived or real. Whether it’s an engine failure or a sticky door handle, it’s all the same. If the problem is reported, it is counted, regardless of whether or not it truly is a problem with the car.

Back to Lexus: The luxury arm of Toyota is famously known for monitoring quality issues and instituting measures to keep those issues at bay. If Lexus sees China as a quality risk, so much so that they refuse to build vehicles locally there, but are willing to build those vehicles in the U.S. and Canada in addition to Japan, maybe that’s a better indicator of what countries build better, higher-quality vehicles.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

56 Comments on “Lexus Rebuffs China Production Due To Quality Concerns (Bonus: “F— This Graph” Edition)...”


  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    As General/Guangzhou Motors imports & incorporates more & more Chinese fabricated components (including entire engines) into its vehicles sold in the U.S.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I wonder if me 93 has any Chinese bits in it.

    • 0 avatar
      threeer

      Yep…Buick is chomping at the bit to import made in China Buicks. Heck, the Encore is already something like 19% Chinese and nearly 80% Korean in content. I’m not convinced that I want a Chinese-built car in my driveway. Yes, I know the computer I am typing on is made in China, but I do my dangdest to avoid Chinese goods in my home, even when it costs more. We all have our reasons, I have mine. But I find it telling that Lexus is staying away from Chinese assembly/production.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I’m not sure this will assist their sales there any. I bet Chinese people are nationalistic in that sense; a point of pride is there for owning a locally produced car, even if it is foreign marque.

    Another issue with the IQS, we have no idea how likely the Chinese are to report such problems. And whether they’re more in tune (ha) with their infotainment (probably are) creating fewer “quality issues.”

    Keep in mind a Chinese person who had a 10 year old Chinese made Hongqui GX-440-L-Chair that gets a new A3 will be pleased if the door handle only sticks, rather than falling off and turning into a dirty razor blade.

    So there’s that too.

  • avatar
    DeeDub

    Yet they have no qualms producing Toyota-badged cars in China.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      To play devil’s advocate, Toyota branded cars are mainstream. In other words, cheap compared to Lexus brand cars. A Lexus buyer should enjoy higher quality standards than someone who buys a Corolla.

      The can probably keep quality in control enough to build cheaper cars, and theyd have to as they sell on price and all of their compeditor’s are the same way. Its a little easier to absorb 30% more money out of an IS customer than it would be a subcompact buyer.

      • 0 avatar
        probert

        The perception of Luxury has little to do with manufacturing quality or engineering. The engineering of a toyota is as refined as a Mercedes, and the manufacturing possibly superior. In fact the German luxo car makers invited Toyota to school them on their manufacturing methods for this very reason.

        A lexus has no higher build quality than a Camry. Luxury is – huh – a state of mind which may be why China is off the books here.

        Must say – it does nothing for Chine/Japan relations which are pretty cold after WW2.

        • 0 avatar
          andyinatl

          Agreed on some points, however luxury is not just state of mind. It’s also better paint jobs that are more resistant to chips/scratches, thicker/plusher carpets as opposed to painted paper that looks like carpet in mainstream brands, switchgear that is more solid and designed for longer use, much better quality of materials and many other things. Leather in Civic feels completely different than leather in Mercedes or Volvo.

          Granted, not all luxury makes are the same and there are plenty of VW switchgear in Audis, but there are distinct differences between mainstream cars and luxury cars. The new mainstream cars cram more electronics in their cars, but those are cheap and really the only thing that mainstream brands can compete on. Improved materials cost more money than dirt cheap chinese chipsets….

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    Way to go Lexus! The graph is meaningless because Chinese built cars are owned by Chinese. It’s not a population that complains due to fear and for other reasons. In the U.S., people bitch on Yelp if their steak is medium versus medium-rare. That aside, are we really going to trust a Chinese survey? LOL! Like the Chinese government has NO incentive to show that cars built there aren’t built like the rest of the crap they produce. I’ll trust the judgment of Toyota Motor Company over a likely biased survey that I’d barely use to wipe my a–.

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

    I absolutely agree. Look at what happened to Ford’s “quality” when the MyFordTouch came out. The issues that people had were mostly related to thst one area. But, to the untrained eye, its easy to assume that Fusions are blowing engines and F-150’s were falling apart when the truth was that Ford had made huge strides in quality, as shown in quality surveys taken before MFT. Their interiors were greatly improved from the cost-cutting 90s/00s as for example, F-150 set new standards for half-ton pickup interiors. The GM-Ford 6-speed auto is one of the most reliable units in a long time from Ford or its suppliers. The V-6s and 5.0L engines enjoy a great reputation.

    None of that is reflected correctly when you count everyone who got lost in MFT-land and thus reported a “quality problem”. Yes, MFT should count against Ford’s quality index some, it was problematic. But, not as much as an engine failure on a one year old car or a wheel bearing going bad at 7,000 miles.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      “Look at what happened to Ford’s “quality” when the MyFordTouch came out. The issues that people had were mostly related to that one area.”

      This needs to die. Ford is having some very real problems with a number of vehicles, namely cracked heads on eco-boosted escapes, F150 Ecoboost issues with the direct injection crudding up intake ports, and issues with the cap-less filling system in northern climates.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        JohnTaurus is a completely whacked out Ford Fanboy complete with Ostrich blinders.

        Ford is having massive reliability problems with many of their currently unveiled vehicles, from the Ford Escape/Lincoln MKeCape, to the Focus, to the Fusion, to the F150, and on and on (transmissions, motors, suspension parts, etc.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

          Thanks for that brillian deduction, DW. Dont you have a farm tractor -vs- ATS comparision to bore us to sleep with instead of acting out your angry personality issues on me?

          What is an eCape? You cant even fail properly.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

        @
        gtemnykh

        I realize there have been issues with EcoBoost and DI (as it is for pretty much everyone who uses it), I didnt mean to give the impression that Ford is perfect. You cant always bat 1,000.

        I was referring to the nose dive they took just after MFT was introduced. Their quality was on a strong upswing before that. MFT has, by now, had its bugs worked out. Im not blaming MFT for current issues and I did not intend that at all with my comment.

        Anyway, Im glad youre here because I came to TTAC to find a recent comment by you and show you this:

        http://boise.craigslist.org/cto/5297421233.html

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          15 for a ’99 oddball with 90K? Worth something but not quite. I think ODB named an album after the mental response I had…

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

            It was just a car he expressed interest in a while back (Esteem wagon with a manual). I dont expect him to seriously consider it. BUT, remember, it is in Idaho, meaning no rust. 90K is pretty low for a 1999 that was mostly sold as a commuter car.

            Me, I want a 5 speed sedan. I dont care much for wagons, but if I had the means, I might consider this one. Id have to paint the wheels silver, add chrome lugnuts. Might be cool if I made a sorta “sedan delivery” out of it by removing the rear seats for a larger cargo hold.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            That’s a nice Suzuki, but doesn’t meet the TTAC Commandments of:

            1) Rear wheel drive (or light AWD system, sending no more than 18% of power to front wheels)

            2) Diesel (turbocharging a diesel, unlike a petrol motor, is not only fine, but the only way to fly)

            3) Manual transmission with hydraulic foot operated clutch & 5 or 6 speed gear lever

            4) Durable yet supple whale peni foreskin leather interior trim* (or PeniTex per 30-mile fetch; see below)

            5) Mocha and/or dark’caramel brown exterior paint option

            6) 0-60 time of less than 7.5 seconds/top speed of 150 mph @ 48mpg

            7) Starting MSRP of $12,998 with fully equipped model maxing out @ $16,339, including destination

            8) Factory standard bumper-to-bumper warranty that is 12 years/120,000 miles

            9) Only station wagon or true hatchback configuration

            10) Actual center console mounted, non-electronic hand brake

            *Per 30-mile fetch: 30-mile fetch
            March 19th, 2014 at 9:00 am
            “DeadWeight,
            I see nothing unreasonable on your list. Except the seating surfaces. Would vinyl grained to imitate whale foreskins be sufficient? Named something catchy like V-fore or Peni-Tex? No?”

            **Tom Szechy
            March 19th, 2014 at 9:03 am
            “PeniTex sounds awesome!”

            ***FoulWX
            March 19th, 2014 at 9:57 am
            “Fore-tex”

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I’m not sure if it would be possible, but I would find a D186 Taurus wagon much more interesting.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

            @28, I know a guy who swapped in a 5 speed manual into a 1987 Taurus wagon (Vulcan). The Mazda-designed/built (iirc) manual transaxle made for the Tempo V-6 and Taurus SHO 3.0L is what he used. I wouldve followed with a MT-5/SHO center console and bucket seats, but he chose to keep the stock flight bench seat. I guess so he can fondle the middle passenger when shifting into 2nd, 4th and Reverse lol.

            I was thinking of putting a rubber mat down in the Esteem’s gutted rear area in the place of carpet. Maybe in the front, too, to make it more utilitarion. I bet it has 14″ (maybe 13″?) wheels, so Id probably find some 16″ steelies to paint (or powder coat so long as we are dreaming) silver and put on it.

            I dont know if its true in your neck of the woods, but its getting hard to find anyone who stocks a decent supply of tires 15″ and under, new or used. Thats one reason I put 2006 Taurus alloys on my 95, the other was because I love their look on the older car (but I want some newer Focus/Fusion alloys baaaad lol). I couldnt find anyone with the stock tire size I needed for my Aerostar (stock 14″) a while back when I had a poorly timed flat, again, the main reason I put 16″ Explorer XLS wheels with lower profile tires on it after that.

            Instead of the Esteem wagon as a psuedo utility/cargo vehicle, though, I think this would serve me much better (but its price is quite a bit higher):
            http://www.minitruckdealer.com/stock_details.php?stock_no=4001

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I think a manual Taurus wagon is right up your alley, assuming you could get the manual trans and not have to drill too many holes in your chassis.

            I can still get 15 inch tires for my Saturn and I think the Volvo uses them too (haven’t needed to buy Volvo tires yet). Anything less than 15 was more difficult to source, at least last I checked.

            I like that Toyota truck/van thing.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

            No. Me no likey Taurus/Sable wagon. I tend to like small wagons (Escort or this Esteem), unless they are a two door “shooting brake” type, namely the Ford Ranch wagon of yester-year, etc.

            I like old Datsun 510 wagons (and the earlier ones), the good 510s, not the later Stanza-rebadged as a Datsun 510 they marketed here before phasing out Datsun. Id rather have a coupe or fastback hatch B210, no wagon. Dont like Tercel wagons either (had one, hated it).

            As you may have seen before, Im not much of a fan of Toyota trucks they sold/sell here. I guess the T100 would be okay with a better powertrain as a basic midsize work truck. Maybe if a Land Cruiser Inline 6 would fit? Edit, I remembered I like the Stout the sold here in the 1960s. Its awesome looking! For a small import truck, Id rather have Datsun or Mazda older pickups over Toyota and Mitsubishi Mighty Max later over the “pickup” (pre-Taco).

            But, that HiAce is frickin sweet. I love the COE design, how utilitarian it looks, the fact that it should be capable with hi/low 4wd, manual trans, diesel engine. The engine is the weak spot, litteraly. I read it should make 90-100 hp. I think replacing that boat anchor with a Cummins BT4 would be a smart move. Im sure the stock engine is good enough for Japan, but asking it to do 70-75 with people and cargo on board would probably tax the hell out of it. I dont want a race truck, just something that can keep up with US highway speeds without wringing the life out of it. A Ford Tempo has similar hp, but its not a crew cab 4×4 truck lol.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

            I texted him. $2500 + itll cost a minimum of a grand to go get it. Nope. I can find something much closer for less.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            People want money for rare and oddball stuff sometimes, about half the time they are right.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          Hoo boy that is a nice find. Totally unknown, underappreciated, and underrated cars. It gutted me to see them start slinging rebadged Daewoos (Forenza, Reno, Verona).

          I’m a big fan of Suzuki SUVs as well, grand Vitaras and sidekicks namely.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

            I like the Verona, only because if I had one, Id stick my upper body out of the sunroof and sing “M-M-M-MY VERONA!” (adapted from “My Sherona” 1980s song).

            Nahh, seriously, I find its transverse mounted Inline 6 interesting, but I hardly aspire to own one like I do a manual Esteem sedan or a sweet Suzuki Jimny. Not much of a Vitara fan, I worked for a GM dealer doing transfer drives in the south east region in the early 2000s. Did not like it when I got stuck in a Chevy Tracker.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            The Porsche developed transverse I6 is definitely an interesting approach, sort of a Korean Volve S80 3.2.

            I remember my family test driving a 5spd Tracker ZR2 in the early 2000s (cross-shopped against a 1st gen CRV and 1st gen Rav4). The salesman had us take it to a snowy parking lot and engage the manual transfer case into 4wd, seemed really exotic and cool at the time to people that only knew ancient Soviet cars and more recently a series of old FWD Hondas.

            My brother has a 2002 Grand Vitara XL-7. the long wheelbase variant, with a manual transmission and the 2.7L V6 (185hp). A surprisingly satisfying vehicle to drive on road and off, and it gets very respectable mileage to boot (up to 25 in the summer). The long wheelbase and not so great ground clearance limit it off road, but it is still much more capable than most people would give it credit for.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

            Maybe Ive misjudged them. I just remember being surprised by the cheap feeling interior and the (what I considered) poor manners at highway speed. I havent driven a Grand Vitara, so have no idea about them.

            I actually liked the X90. Id totally rock one! For a small SUV, Id love a first gen Kia Sportage 5 speed 4wd. Based on Mazda bones, including the 2.0L engine. Ive wanted one since they were new! 4 door or the ‘vert, just make it a manual trans and 4wd.

            Oh yeah. My best friend lives something like 45 miles from this Esteem sedan 5 spd. I should put JDM badges on it! Gotta find a tach cluster for it and dump the hidious wheel covers.

            http://seattle.craigslist.org/sno/cto/5220652440.html

            I told him to go get it for me! Lol

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Oh the interior is pretty horrid, his pre-2003 has the ugliest steering wheel I’ve ever seen on a vehicle. A two spoke affair, where the spokes are these weird concave bulges :/ His other car is a 1989 Mazda MPV (rwd, 2.6L I4) with 230+k miles, the Vitara was a pretty big downgrade in terms of roominess and interior quality, but for his locale and outdoorsy hobbies, the Vitara was a perfect fit. I reckon that Mazda of his has seen more offroad miles than 99% of SUVs in the US. Fire roads, stream crossings, you name it. With a set of snow tires and chains, he’s even taken it WAY too far for comfort down some fire roads in the winter. So for him to start driving an actual BOF SUV with a legit low range transfer case was a godsend. He’s put a set of manual hubs on the front and some Cooper AT3 All terrain tires on it, but has so far resisted installing a mild lift which I think would make a big difference. As it sits, the manual hubs helped him pick up a solid couple of MPG on the road. my ’96 4Runner, bone stock, obviously obliterates the poor little ‘zook offroad, but the Suzuki is significantly better on-road in terms of ride and handling.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

            I know Suzuki built decent off roaders, including the Vitara (as opposed to car-based models), and I really respect the Samuri.

            Likewise, my ’86 2-door Trooper was pretty decent off road, and the automatic hubs worked flawlessly, even with 16″ wheels and slightly oversized Wranglers.

            The Sportage’s interior is nothing to brag about either lol, I just like them more overall.

            What your friend needs is an All-Sport! Duh! Lol I rather liked the All-Sport. Of all the minivans pretending to be SUVs, it was the most convincing. Honda shouldve given the first Oddy AWD, a little ground clerance and a more powerful engine, to be sold next to the big replacement. it wouldve been ahead of the crossover curve!

            Speaking of Honda’s, despite being a car-based vehicle, Id like an AWD 5-speed Element. Ive never driven an Element but I like them a lot. I know it probably wont go where a true SUV would go, but I bet its a great all-around utility-cum-gas saver.

            If I had a Sportage like I wanted, Id probably do a two inch lift. I dont want to be the biggest baddest vehicle lol just a little more capable than stock. I see them online with manual hubs.

            On the other hand, my best friend has a 91 Ford Ranger XLT ex-cab 4.0L, automatic, *manual transfer case and factory hubs*, in very good shape. He wants a commuter car like a Honda or something like that. So far, I tried to convince him not to get rid of the Ranger because he and I both know he will regret it. we’ve been through this several times since his first 92 similarly equipped was rear ended (at a stop) by a 4Runner doing 60+. I was trying to get him to save up and buy a cool little CRX or something, but keep the Ranger for truck/off-road/snow situations.

            maybe instead I should just let him sell me the truck. I could use a pickup for work anyway. Lol Why didnt I think of this before?

    • 0 avatar
      Superdessucke

      Volvo is about to find this out the hard way.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Yuuup.

        What irks me about it is – they’ll be making the cars for what, 35% cheaper let’s say than in Sweden.

        Are they pricing the S60 25% lower to pass that savings to the consumer, and pay them for their sacrifice in driving a Chinese break-apart mobile? Nah.

    • 0 avatar
      Number6

      The 6-speed slush box in my 2013 Fusion is miraculously worse than the 2011 F-150 6-speed EB I used to own. And that’s not even considering the leaky driver-side bearing that the TSB covers.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

        I dont doubt it, I was just comparing old FWD 4 speeds and the tried-and-failed CVT on the early D3 cars to it. Overall, that transaxle has a decent track record. Seems like someone mentioned on here the other day that its more common for Fusion and Escape than it is in the late 00/early 2010s+ D3 and others that use it.

        My parent’s 2012 Taurus has nearly 75,000 on it, shifts like new and has no leaks. The powertrain in that car has been solid since day one. The car is an SEL, not the Limited. I believe MFT was on the Limited, but SEL shared it’s powertrain. The car has had 0 mechanical or electrical issues. Ive maintained it with nothing but Motorcraft air filter and oil/filter The interior is of much higher quality in terms of materials and performance of the EATC, Sync, etc. Nothing is broken

        By the time their previous car (a 2008 Grand Marquis) had this mileage, it really showed it inside. The Taurus interior still looks/feels pretty much new.On top of that, the Grand Marquis had several issues such as the CD player not working (replaced under warranty) and I had to replace the failed EATC (actually sent it and recieved it back to a guy on eBay that fixes the flaw).

        As I said, Ford’s quality took a big step forward in just a few years.

        That’s what Im talking about.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          Ford Tauruses from any era are 8000% more reliable than their Toyota Camry & Honda Accord counterparts, and anyone who dares claim otherwise is part of the Vast Anti-Ford Conspiracy that has been sweeping the nation for the last 35 years.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Lexus is correct.

    My employer (a Fortune 100 company) believes all you need to make products in China is a print and a purchase order. Hence the closure of another profitable American factory. My job as a design engineer is in jeopardy because my work can be done cheaper in Asia, by one person to do design work, and 2 people to fix it.

    But I’d suggest Lexus desperately needs to improve its grille designs – just about anyone does them better.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      A highly skilled CNC operator at FCA Sterling Stamping told me 25% of his time was spent getting Chinese sourced parts into proper spec before going on vehicle components.

      He said there was no doubt in his mind that FCA is paying more for such redundancies versus just having competent shops stateside or elsewhere make those parts properly the first time, but he loved the overtime.

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    We’re talking manufacturing right, not design? So how is a fastener installed in Japan better than the same fastener installed in China? Or is there a cultural issue in China where people are lazy/unskilled and cannot install said fastener?

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      1. It won’t be the same fastener, because the Chinese supplier will make it from “steel”, rather than the proper grade. That saves a penny.

      2. The threads will be smooth for first article inspection, then rough for production. That saves a penny.

      3. The work instructions at a supplier will be missing or out of date, so the fasteners installed on a subassembly may not be torqued correctly.

      4. After each holiday, the suppliers will lose 10% of their workforce because people found different jobs, taking whatever intellectual property with them they could.

      5. The Japanese worker won’t sleep if the job isn’t done perfectly, but the Chinese worker figures it’s ‘good enough’.

      • 0 avatar
        ksmo

        SCE to AUX –

        Spot on. Excellent break down.

      • 0 avatar
        jansob

        Totally on target. I work in Japan, and my Chinese students are very honest about the fact that cheating the customer is par for the course in China…they buy Japanese-made goods to bring home as gifts. China has strict laws that are utterly unenforced, and foreign businesses must do business through Chinese go-betweens whose loyalty is, to put it mildly, questionable. I’ve been told flat-out, by the son of a factory owner, that unless you have your own inspectors in the factory, your goods will not meet the specs you paid for. There’s no incentive because the prices are so low there’s a never-ending stream of customers.
        Good for Lexus.

        PS: and just to be clear, Chinese factories/workers are certainly capable of world-class work (the iPhone I’m typing this on is Starfleet quality)….but it requires rigorous monitoring, and Lexus knows that even after paying for such oversight, its potential customers know the risks of manufacturing in China.

    • 0 avatar
      Funky

      Cactuar,It is not a cultural issue where people are lazy or unskilled. But, instead, a cultural issue of not wanting to admit to having made a mistake (and, doing whatever is necessary to cover-up a mistake that has been made without drawing attention to the mistake thus resulting in “quality issues” or “manufacturing non-conformances”). This is a particular problem when a manufacturer is building an item where safety is a concern (eg. a car’s safety related components).

      • 0 avatar
        mchan1

        “… a cultural issue of Not wanting to Admit to having made a mistake (and, doing whatever is necessary to cover-up a mistake that has been made… ”

        How is this any different than any Other company esp. American companies?

        Like… GM or even VW? :X

  • avatar
    Aquineas

    I’d be curious to see what the actual numbers are for the cars being made in Mexico.

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    This sounds as much like a branding initiative as it does a frank assessment of the limits to Chinese production capability.

    “Lexus is too demanding to trust Shinajin.”

    • 0 avatar
      jansob

      Definitely. Put your own inspectors in the factory and you’ll get first-class products…..but Lexus’ customers know the reputation of Chinese manufacturing: cheap, fast and probably not up to spec. And in the luxury market, reputation is everything.

  • avatar
    tekdemon

    “That truth: Cars sold in America are more technologically advanced, on average, than cars sold in China, and people buying cars in America have issues using all that new tech.”

    Do you actually have data for this claim? Because in my experience Chinese OEMs are much more apt to throw in relatively cheap to implement in car tech like nav systems, backup cameras, to somewhat gimmicky stuff like remote driving your car because that stuff is easier to catch up on than beating American/European/Japanese manufacturers on powertrain technology.

    Most cars sold in the US don’t even come with a basic nav system so to try to pin this entirely on in-car tech is pretty ridiculous.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    You should compare the US and Chinese IQS results directly by brand. You’ll note that US-market cars consistently have higher problem rates.

    Examples:

    Porsche: 56 in China vs 80 in the US

    Volvo: 64 in China vs 120 in the US

    Land Rover: 66 in China vs 134 in the US

    Lexus: 71 in China vs 104 in the US

    VW: 106 in China vs 123 in the US

    This tells me that there are meaningful differences in the surveys and/or respondents. The scores between countries are probably not directly comparable.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • dal20402: These cars were the near-exact equivalent of the mini-stereos that all the Japanese electronics companies...
  • ToolGuy: The period from 1987 to 1995 was not kind to Subaru [skip to the “Annual Vehicle Sales Chart”]:...
  • cimarron typeR: I don’t know why you wouldn’t buy a G70 /Stinger GT over this. True rwd and 100k...
  • cimarron typeR: Interesting that the prndl gear display for auto is the exact as our 81 Corolla wagon growing up....
  • 28-Cars-Later: Should I review the MY14 Cadillac SRX I drove a drunk girl home in last night? :D

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber