By on September 30, 2015

It is no surprise that environmental activists are staging protests in reaction to the Volkswagen emission scandal. Members of Greenpeace marched last week outside the VW plant in Wolfsburg, Germany. Somewhere in America, we are sure someone will print off one of those red and white pro-union banners saying “Shame on XYZ Volkswagen” and plant themselves in front of a VW dealership.

But to shame a TDI owner who is possibly already miffed knowing his car may be dropping in value — and possibly gas mileage and torque after the emission fix?

Portland resident Rick Gencarelli found the following note under the windshield wiper of his Jetta TDI over the weekend:

Hello, VW TDI owner. While cute, your TDI is outfitted with a cheating device meant to elude emission standards. Your car is currently polluting at rates higher than nearly any modern gasoline car today. Not to mention VW lied to you and the public, and was founded by Nazis (sad face). Perhaps it’s time to consider a different car.

(Signed) A sympathetic and concerned citizen of Portland.

As the locals say — in a shameless ripoff of Austin, Texas’ motto — “Keep Portland Weird!”

“It’s ridiculous. And very funny, and very Portland,” said Gencarelli in the clip above.

Kudos to Gencarelli for laughing it off, but would you?

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110 Comments on “Portlandian Plants “Nazi” Note On Dirty Diesel VW...”


  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    Nope. I would have it analyzed, find the A-hole and put a bullet in his or her head. Then I would blame Obama.

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      Satire, right? This has to be satire.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      The problem is, the one who wrote the note is right on Nazis. Thousands of prisoners were worked to death at VW factories. How would you buy a car from the company with such passed? We always say Hitler and his Nazis… but these guys, from German companies were ardent supporters and profiteers. And their families to this day benefit from it.

      • 0 avatar
        Wheatridger

        So perhaps you’d like to make today’s Germans pay for the Nazi atrocities? First, you could kill off their largest employer, VW. Then you could boycott all other german products, too, because BMW, Porsche, Bosch and the rest might employ the offspring of Nazis. Once the evil Nazi spawn have no jobs, you could put them in work camps to make guilt-free products, or just do hard labor. If there’s not enough work for them and they’re too expensive to feed, then there’s the Final Solution…

        Isn’t it obvious that assigning collective guilt for age-old sins is the same sick game that the Nazis played?

      • 0 avatar
        geozinger

        If that’s the case, then, no one should by from Fiat. Or Mitsubishi, or maybe any Japanese company. Many of the descendants of these people and companies have benefited greatly, too.

        Loads of people seem to forget that Italy was a part of the Axis powers and while they basically retreated from all Allied advances had their own atrocities in Africa.

        Also forgotten are the death marches of Allied POWs all over Asia and that both non-Japanese civilians and POWs were used for horrible chemical and biological experiments. Not forgetting the “comfort battalions” made up of non-Japanese women forced into sexual slavery.

        • 0 avatar
          Syke

          Given the Italian performance in WWII, I don’t think its necessary to boycott them. After all, they gave the British some badly needed victories in the dark days of 1940, and collapsed very nicely once the Allies had taken Sicily. Their fighting abilities (actually, their officer’s fighting abilities, Rommel though the enlisted ranks were pretty solid soldiers) almost made them allies by default.

          • 0 avatar

            I’m Jewish. My father served in World War II, lost a lot of family. He harbored a lifelong resentment/distrust of Germans. In 1973, he was about to buy a Capri until he found out it was made in Cologne, not Dagenham.

            Nonetheless, the old man couldn’t hold a grudge against the Italians — except maybe Mussolini’s leadership. Even to him, they were too lovably inept at war.

      • 0 avatar
        Domestic Hearse

        slavuta,

        BMW built aircraft engines for the Nazis. Mitsubishi built planes for Imperial Japan. Ford built tanks and trucks for the U.S. and the Allies, and also licensed its engines for profit to the Germans. Hitler’s limo was a Benz.

        War is a racket. Multinationals profit. If you boycott every car company with ties to former enemies and ruling parties, you’ll be riding a horse. But then, Lee rode a horse. So did Grant. Custer rode a horse. So did Crazy Horse. Hmmmm.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          FUN FACT: The Soviets stole the tools, dies, and assembly equipment for the original Opel Kadett and sold it as the East German assembled Moskvitch 400 for years.

          “Cars as well as truck production lines were lost by Opel. As reparations for war destruction, under plans of the Allied Forces, the Soviet Union asked the Allied Military Government for the tools, jigs, dies, fixtures, and drawings for the Kadett. This, they said, they would use to begin auto production at an Opel subsidiary in Russian-occupied Leipzig. The equipment was duly delivered to the Soviets in June 1946, and that was the last Opel was to see of it – but not of the Kadett.

          Just a year later a new Soviet car, the Moskvitch 400, rolled off a Moscow assembly line. It seemed to be the Opel Kadett in every detail, with only the name changed (various sources provide contradictory information; see the respective article). By late 1950, the Russians were exporting these Kremlin Kadetts to Belgium, stressing in their promotion that spare parts could easily be obtained from Germany. Not until 1959 was a Moskvitch model introduced that bore no trace of Opel engineering. And by that time, Opel was just about ready to introduce a new Kadett of its own.”

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opel

          • 0 avatar
            Synchromesh

            Russians didn’t “steal” anything. It’s not like they snuck in, grabbed the stuff and left quietly. They took German technology as part of reparation. Much like tons of other nations including US who benefited from a lot of German research immediately following the war.

            They modified the designs too since coping with Russian conditions was a different matter entirely. On top of that, there were tons of German cars brought to Russia after the war. Not to copy but to use. That’s perfectly normal, considering how much damage the Germans had done to the Russians overall.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Hmmmmmm taking property that didn’t belong to them without compensation at the point of a gun… sounds like theft to me. Let’s call it what it is and note that all nations do it as spoils of war.

            I’m not surprised to learn about Russian modifications but that’s an interesting point you added. Russian engineers are certainly clever with their auto/aircraft designs made to handle Russia’s varied topography. Reading about the Soviet era jetliners and their capabilities is worth the time.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          Was horse made in Germany?

      • 0 avatar
        Maymar

        Opel made trucks for the Nazis, so GM’s out. Henry Ford was a known anti-Semite and Nazi sympathizer, so rule them out to be safe. NASA used just a whole bunch of German scientists post-war, so we should cancel that too.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          GM claimed it was seized after war was declared. How true that is I do not know.

          “GM’s Alfred Sloan recalled:

          “(Opel) had been seized by the German government soon after the war began. In 1942 our entire investment in Opel amounted to about $35 million, and under a ruling which the Treasury Department had made concerning assets in enemy hands, we were allowed to write off the investment against current taxable income. But this ruling did not end our interest in, or responsibility for, the Opel property. As the end of the war drew near, we were given to understand that we were still considered the owners of the Opel stock; and we were also given to understand that as the owners, we might be obliged to assume responsibility for the property.” ”

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opel

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          Gather ’round while I sing you of Wernher von Braun,
          A man whose allegiance is ruled by expedience.
          Call him a Nazi, he won’t even frown,
          “Ha, Nazi, Schmazi,” says Wernher von Braun.

          Don’t say that he’s hypocritical,
          Say rather that he’s apolitical.
          “Once the rockets are up, who cares where they come down?
          That’s not my department,” says Wernher von Braun.

          Some have harsh words for this man of renown,
          But some think our attitude should be one of gratitude,
          Like the widows and cripples in old London town,
          Who owe their large pensions to Wernher von Braun.

          You too may be a big hero,
          Once you’ve learned to count backwards to zero.
          “In German oder English I know how to count down,
          Und I’m learning Chinese!” says Wernher von Braun.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        You’re being extremely silly. You kind of *had* to be a supporter of the Nazi party back then. Beside that, I think there’s a point at which benefitting on past exploits (of other people) is no longer unethical. Most of the people who were genuinely in support of the Nazi party are no longer alive; why punish their ancestors? And if you really want to go that route, we as Americans benefit today because our forbearers abused and exploited the Native Americans that were originally here. Where does that leave us?

        • 0 avatar
          Toad

          slavuta, don’t forget that many US (and foreign) crops are grown farms that once benefited from slavery. Factories that produce goods you use may also benefited from slavery, and your house probably sits on land taken from some sort of native people. Oh, and you probably attended a school and/or university that benefited from slavery, discrimination, and a countless microagressions.

          The only solution is to give away all possessions, flog & starve yourself, and spend the rest of your life in a cave, covered in ashes, wearing only a loincloth. Enjoy your penance.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            Right, all the crops in the breadbasket of the nation–the Midwest–are on former slave land. Pull the other one. Now, former Native American land, yeah, probably.

      • 0 avatar
        derekson

        Mercedes, BMW, Ford and GM also had German factories that had imprisoned workers and that built tanks and planes for the Nazi war machine. And IBM’s German division built the computer systems they used to track and tabulate the Jewish people and other “undesirables” to round them up and send them to the concentration camps. Ford and IBM both helped the German war efforts with the consent of their U.S.-based leadership.

    • 0 avatar
      S1L1SC

      From what I remember there was a whole race of people that got exterminated during the settling of the USA. Maybe we shouldn’t support any of the companies or the corporations that resulted from that.

      Last I checked there were no Native American owned and run automotive companies in the USA though…

      Pretty damn silly to trott out the whole Nazi crap 70+ years later when most of the people responsible for that mess are dead or close to dead.

    • 0 avatar
      GeneralMalaise

      Forget it, Jake. It’s Portlandia

  • avatar
    jrmason

    “(Signed) A pathetic and delusioned citizen of Portland.”

    Fixed it for ya.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Probably a rep touting from a none VW stealership. It would work the other way for me I’d shop VW for discount.

  • avatar

    Maybe if TDi shaming becomes a thing outside of Portlandia passive-agressive types, I predict owners will be spending some quality time with a hairdryer and goo-gone, removing the offending badges.

    (Nothing against Portland, Oregon, or the Pacific NW, just against passive-agressive behaviour like this)

  • avatar
    notapreppie

    The thing I hate about this crap isn’t the professed sentiment, it’s manner in which the sentiment is expressed. An anonymous note doesn’t allow for any kind of discussion.

    The author is actually only interested in feeling smugly superior.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff Weimer

      “The author is actually only interested in feeling smugly superior.”

      Welcome to Portland.

    • 0 avatar
      Toad

      This could be the genesis of a great “Portlandia” episode! Putting anonymous shaming notes on different vehicles, then buildings, then homes, then people, and finally yourself.

      Self righteousness, given enough time, usually becomes a circular firing squad.

  • avatar
    EAF

    This makes the news in Portland? Lmao! The note was left by a concerned neighbor slash citizen, no big deal. I don’t find the note even remotely offensive. People are way too sensative, it is not like the car was vandalized or the owner threatened.

    Lastly, VW was founded by the National Socialist Party and VW did install cheat devices, so the note does not lie either.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff Weimer

      It’s the implicit assumption that a VW TDI owner has no idea there is an emissions problem with his car or the history of the company.

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      “…VW was founded by the National Socialist Party and VW did install cheat devices, so the note does not lie either.”

      True, but they’re only tangentially related. The National Socialist Party referenced in the note ceased to exist about 70 years ago, but VW is still a going concern. Using that same logic, I guess maybe we should also bring up Henry Ford’s ardent anti-Semitism every time there’s an issue with a Ford product. Or Henri Peugeot’s anti-Semitism (not as relevant in the US, I guess). But that would be just as ridiculous as that sanctimonious note…

      I grow weary of at any time there’s an issue with even the slightest German connection, we go straight to Godwin’s Law (Corollary?) and mention Hitler or the Nazi Party. So many wonderful things came before and after that 12 year stretch of insanity (that caused just as much pain to Germans as it did to others) and the resulting shame is something that they may never escape, totally.

      But, give the whole Nazi thing a rest already…

      • 0 avatar
        redav

        Hey, the Nazis were the first to demonstrate the link between tobacco and cancer, and they began efforts to eliminate tobacco use among their “master race.” After all, clean air, pure water, and the best natural foods were what the Nazis prescribed because nothing was too good for the ubermensch. I hope Portlanders don’t abandon those things just because the Nazis promoted the same.

        People have to learn to separate the bad things people do and the good work they produce.

      • 0 avatar

        The VW Beetle itself was actually conceived by a Jew. I’m sure Ronnie can fill us in. In fact, I think he wrote about this in the past.

        • 0 avatar

          While it’s true that Josef Ganz popularized the idea of a “volkswagen”, a people’s car, simple and cheap but technically advanced, and while he undoubtedly influenced Dr. Porsche (there is a photo of Ferry Porsche test driving one of Ganz’s prototypes), the Beetle itself was Dr. Porsche’s design. Porsche acknowledged “looking over the shoulder” of Hans Ledwinka in the design of the flat four engine and after the war VW would end up paying a few million deutschmarks to Tatra over the issue, so it’s not unreasonable to say that Porsche also borrowed some concepts from Ganz. The Standard Superior Volkswagen, produced in 1933 and 1934, designed by Ganz, was on the list of small cars that Dr. Porsche compiled when he solicited Hitler about working on the KdF/VW project.

          However, the postwar Volkswagen company was started by the British occupation forces under Major Ivan Hirst, who saw the Wolfsburg factory as a way of helping Germany rebuild. Heinrich Nordhoff, a former Opel executive, was brought in to run the company in 1948. A quick search doesn’t show any connections between Nordhoff and the Wolfsburg factory that made early Beetles and then Kubelwagens and other Type I military variants during the war.

          The Volkswagen company wasn’t the same organization that was created to make the KdF Wagen, but it did use the same factory and many of the former employees there.

      • 0 avatar
        snakebit

        I always wonder why Americans don’t connect Californian millennials to their great-grandparents who rounded up and imprisoned Japanese-Americans at Manzanar during WWII, but are still fine with holding German millennials responsible for the atrocities of their great-grandparents who were NAZI participants. At what point do you plan to give current German citizens, who weren’t alive 70 plus years ago during the war, a pass? At what point do you plan to learn about the Germany of today?

        • 0 avatar
          Chan

          Some people just aren’t interested in facts and learning. They are only interested in being right. If they can’t be so, they at least want to feel like they are right.

        • 0 avatar
          kmars2009

          Not long ago, VW had to pay out to the Jewish descendants of Nazi slaves. Proof that Nazi’s were a big part of VW. I’m not certain Ferdinand Porche was a Nazi. However, he did work with the Nazi’s during that time. Hence the payout.

          • 0 avatar
            Syke

            He was. Now, how enthusiastic a Nazi is called into question. Membership in the Party was pretty much mandatory if you were working in the defense establishment. Then again, he was personal friends with Hitler. At the same time, I don’t think he was considered a war criminal once passions had cooled down a couple of years after the surrender.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          Actually, I give current Germans more respect for turning around Nazi to normal than other nations, especially in the Eastern Europe. But I will never give a break to VW as a company.

      • 0 avatar
        notapreppie

        Godwin’s Law.

        Next time somebody points this out to me, I’ll remind them that Ford Motor Company was founded by a raging anti-semite.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Anti-Semite does not equal exterminating a race of people.

          Henry Ford certainly had his flaws, and they should be brought to light. However, if you look at almost anyone that was born over 100 years ago through 21st century eyes, you are going to be disappointed in many of their social views.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          We know this. Henry Ford – personal friend and supporter of Hitler.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            There is certainly a connection between Henry Ford and Hitler. The Germans admired what Ford had done with assembly lines, modernization, and manufacturing power. Ford liked that the Nazi party wanted to do that on a national level. Hitler probably also saw Ford a contemporary that wielded power and disliked Jews. They both started writing in the twenties about the Jewish threat. They also had a business connection. Let’s not make him part of the Final Solution though.

          • 0 avatar
            jpolicke

            Hitler didn’t have pictures of any other Americans on his wall. Just Henry.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Oh well, if he had pictures of Henry Ford on his wall, that means ol’ Henry fired up the Zyklon gas chambers. I’m not aware of what is or is not in Hitler’s personal memory book, but it makes perfect sense that he would admire a successful industrialist that wrote “The International Jew”.

          • 0 avatar

            There’s no indication that Henry Ford and Adolph Hitler were personal friends. As far as I know they never met. There was some level of mutual admiration and Ford proudly accepted a medal of honor from the Nazi regime. Most of us have seen the photos.

            I’ve seen some not very well documented allegations that Henry Ford provided some financial support to the Nazis before they took power but I don’t believe them.

            There is a little more basis to the claim that Edsel Ford would have been indicted for trading with the enemy had he not died. It appears that FoMoCo in Dearborn may have been exercising control over the Cologne works via go-betweens in Vichy France. Again, some of the sources are of questionable reliability but there seems to be more to this than the apparent urban legend the Henry funded Adolph.

            Ford was a Jew-hater (I prefer that honest term to the sanitized “anti-Semite”). There’s no doubt about that. He was an uneducated farm boy with prejudices against bankers, Jews, engineers and accountants. There is no indication, however, that Henry Ford was an exterminationist Jew-hater, and much evidence to the contrary. He divided world Jewry into two groups, the “good Jews”, people whom he personally knew, like his architect Albert Kahn, and the “bad Jews”, the boogeymen of his fevered imagination. Every year, along with the other prominent clergymen in Detroit, Rabbi Leo Franklin, of Temple Beth El, and also a neighbor of the Fords in Detroit’s Boston-Edison district, received a new Model T as a gift from Henry. When the Ford-controlled Dearborn Independent started publishing The International Jew, more or less a version of the Protocols of the Elders of Zion forgery, Rabbi Franklin sent back his Model T. Ford didn’t understand. He thought Franklin was one of the good Jews.

            That being said, since Henry’s death, the Ford family, most notably Henry Ford II, have been good friends to the Jewish community. I’ve written about that here at TTAC at some length but one story will suffice for now. In 1973, while the Yom Kippur war was still raging, Henry Ford II literally asked the question (I know a witness), “What can Ford Motor Company do to help Israel in this war?” and subsequently arranged for the emergency shipment of trucks and lowboy trailers from Europe so the Israelis could move tanks to the front (by then Pres. Nixon had started to resupply them after they’d lost many of their front line armor in the initial attacks from Syria and Egypt).

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            You right – Henry and Adolf never personally met but Adolf called Henry “a personal friend” and awarded him with Germany’s highest honor http://rarehistoricalphotos.com/henry-ford-receiving-grand-cross-german-eagle-nazi-officials-1938/

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      “Concerned”.

      BY WHAT?

  • avatar
    MrGrieves

    South Park really nailed the “smug” factor in the episode featuring Priuses. I’m sure this person drives a Prius and loves the smell of their own flatulence.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    And that is why we refer to it as the left coast, weird but really no harm done, perhaps he or she should have left a downpayment for a Telsa so Portland would be safe.

  • avatar
    Compaq Deskpro

    When will we start seeing VW diesel wagons rolling coal?

  • avatar
    MBella

    I always thought that Austin ripped off the slogan from Portland.

  • avatar
    andyinatl

    As someone who spent (regrettably) 13 years in Pacific NW, this doesn’t surprise me one bit. This is very indicative of the type of people that live there. Not everyone, but enough of these types to notice them daily. I live in Atlanta area now, but having visited Portland this past summer to see relatives, i can report that nothing changed.

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      The first time that I ever visited the Pacific NW which was a brief layover in Seattle in the late 90s. Even in those halcyon days they had like 6 different categories of recycling trash cans.

      There’s very little about those people that isn’t improved by distance.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    Ah Portland, this was only a matter of time.

    If I was rocking a TDI I for sure would have the hair dryer and goo gone out this weekend. A note from some tool is harmless and perhaps even a bit comical.

    Any takers on the over/under on how many days it takes for this escalate to less amusing forms of communication like keys or spray paint?

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      I look forward (sarcastically) to people doing that to 2006 and earlier VWs that *don’t* “cheat”.

      And I would not be at all surprised to find this person thinking “hey, those old Mercedes veggie oil conversions are totally awesome!”, because hey, who cares if they have *no emissions tech at all*, it’s not using oiiiiil!

      (* My ’76 300D didn’t even have a catalytic converter, from the factory.

      I’m pretty sure just starting the engine released more soot and NOx than a modern TDI VW emits in half an hour.

      I am only slightly exaggerating.)

  • avatar
    Pig_Iron

    I think I might go Dieselpunk for Halloween.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    Hmm, I’m going to go with simply “fake” as at this point the owner has not sought any financial compensation for the letter (which he wrote himself) as far as I can tell, so he’s just seeking attention. Once he starts looking for reimbursement, then I’ll declare it “fraud.”

    • 0 avatar
      Domestic Hearse

      Being the Pacific NW, I’m pointing the finger directly at Bigfoot, tree-hugger extraordinaire.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      Why do you think it’s fake?

      Note that people who *live in Portland* find this *completely plausible*.

      It’s not as omnipresent as some people suggest, but the kind of idiotic smug superiority on display *definitely exists* here.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    Not much “sympathetic” about that note, but kudos to having enough car knowledge to distinguish a diesel VW from a gas. I keep waiting for something like this to show up on my 5 cylinder Sportwagen.

    I wonder if Mr. or Mrs. Concerned Citizen is aware and outraged that his/her non-GMO flax and quinoa fortified Panda Crunchies are probably shipped by a diesel 18-wheeler and not on the back of some carbon-free alpaca train.

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    Throw it in the trash and move on, nothing to see here.

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    Maybe the owner is gay and will want to get married in Rowan County, KY; both sides can have a crack at him.

  • avatar
    brettc

    Gas mileage? What is that? TDIs do great for fuel economy but “gas mileage” is not a thing with cars that don’t run on gasoline.

    I’m surprised I haven’t heard about this in Portland, Maine yet. Lots of hippies here too.

  • avatar
    06V66speed

    Shocked that the same parties involved with writing that damming letter didn’t pop out of some nearby shrubbery and flog the TDI owner to death with their flip-flops.

    “Next time, buy a PRIUS!!!”

  • avatar
    runs_on_h8raide

    Both the note placer and VW are cowards. The note placer for being an anonymous twat, the VW for not having the balls to go out and by a Ram Cummins turbo diesel P/U and turning it into a lifted coal roller with NRA and “smoke ’em if you got ’em” Stickers plastered on the bumper and tailgate.

    Just from this article, I surmise Portland must be a shithole of an immeasurable magnitude.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      “Just from this article, I surmise Portland must be a sh**hole of an immeasurable magnitude.”

      Well, they forced out their AAA baseball team, the Portland Beavers (a member of the original 1903 Pacific Coast League) to convert the stadium for a women’s pro soccer team. The mayor dawdled over finding/financing another ballpark, and the owner sold the team to the parent club, the Padres, who moved the team to Tucson, and there have been no Beavers in Portland since.

  • avatar
    redliner

    People take this way too serious. Life is short. Laugh it off. The circumstances that created this situation are uniquely human, and as such, worthy of mockery.

  • avatar
    theoldguard

    Reductio ad Hitlerum

    http://www.fallacyfiles.org/adnazium.html

  • avatar
    JimothyLite

    To put it in context, consider: Oregon is the only member state of the Pacific Bloc with a worker pool talented enough to handle the specialized equipment at fueling stations, thus keeping the citizens’ hands away from harmful petrotoxins and preventing spontaneous oilfires. If anyplace is qualified to issue Nazioil cards, Oregon is.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    It’s nice they chose the VW commercial font to use for their note, while the note itself is obnoxious and self-righteous. And the TDI lettering on his car is really freakin crooked, as well. I couldn’t drive around like that.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I once had some idiot leave a note telling me I should engage in buttsex with Obama because I had his sticker on my car.

    Morons are morons. And clickbait is clickbait.

  • avatar

    On a somewhat related note, Karl Ludvigsen has a new book out, Professor Porsche’s Wars, about the military machines that Ferdinand Porsche made, starting with the Austro-Hungarian empire and ending with the Nazis.

  • avatar

    How about I just drive whatever the hell I want without being made to feel like I have to make amends for some long-ago travesty?

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