By on March 2, 2015

Honda-Civic-Type-R-Live-02

At 310 horsepower, the Honda Civic Type R represents the first turbocharged performance vehicle from Honda, and the big H is aiming for the fastest front-wheel drive time around the Nurburgring.

Unlike past VTECs, peak torque of 295 lb-ft will come online at just 2500 rpm. The only transmission choice will be a 6-speed manual transmission. Brembo brakes, bucket seats, a stiffer suspension and selectable drive modes round out the rest of the package. While the front suspension features a new “Dual Axis” setup similar to Ford’s RevoKnuckle system in the old Focus RS, the rear utilizes a torsion beam rather than a fully independent suspension.

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30 Comments on “Geneva 2015: Honda Civic Type-R Revealed...”


  • avatar
    APaGttH

    …the rear utilizes a torsion beam…

    Whiskey
    Tango
    Fox-trot

    • 0 avatar
      superchan7

      The Euro Civic has had a torsion beam rear suspension for a while now. If it’s designed and tuned well, it shouldn’t be a problem. The car probably already rides stiff anyway, being the sportiest Civic.

      This is kind of like the outrage over Porsche using MacPherson struts on all of its sports cars. It works, and mid-engine Porsches stand on their own in terms of handling prowess. Especially for their price.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      I asked this in another thread: the old Euro Civic had this, too.

      It’s the same suspension as the Fit, and as a result it has the same awesomely flexible seating and huge interior space. The Fit is a little more practical because of the higher roofline, but this is a nice touch.

    • 0 avatar

      Ewwww. But it makes for a better excuse to buy that BRZ or WRX, so it’s actually good in the grand scheme of things.

    • 0 avatar
      Silence

      Hey hey, don’t knock it. Torsion suspensions come from a very long line of racing tanks dating from WW2.

    • 0 avatar
      duffman13

      While I didn’t agree with it, I could at least understand why they got rid of the double wishbones up front fr crash test and packaging reasons.

      Getting rid of them in the rear though? Ok, if they went with struts there too. But for a non-independent rear-end? Does not compute.

  • avatar
    carguy

    Honda has claimed a 0-60 time of 5.7 seconds.

    That is either very conservative or the Type R has real problems getting the power to the ground.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      All manufacturers claim conservative 0 to 60 times with lawyers everywhere ready to sue over any perceived deception.

      My understanding with FWD about the best you can do is 5 seconds to 60 and still have a street driving friendly car.

      You cannot change the laws of physics

  • avatar
    Speedygreg7

    What is the point of this car? Why would you put so much engineering effort in to a compromised chassis? I fully understand a fun front drive car like the old Civic Si and CRX and GTIs. However, when you get to 300 lb ft of torque in a front driver you have to engineer special steering knuckles to combat torque steer and probably have to have the ECU limit the engine in gears 1 & 2 like Mazda did in the Mazdaspeed3.

    Wouldn’t all that engineering effort have been better used adding the CRV’s AWD system to send some power to the rear?

    I just don’t get it.

    • 0 avatar
      superchan7

      The Civic never being intended to drive the rear wheels, the basic structure does not leave room for a driveshaft.

      This car exists because Civic, and because Type-R. If it drove the rear wheels, it wouldn’t be a Civic.

      I agree that this power level is overkill for a FWD setup.

    • 0 avatar
      Beerboy12

      The point, like every thing else, is to make money, because there are people who want and will pay money for this little pocket rocket.
      And because they can.

  • avatar
    maxxcool7421

    t bet it will be the rpm limit. if it is still in the high 7’s cut off at 8… the time to spin the tach will account for the non-5.0 or under 0-60.

    also factor in the diff, which will still be geared for “economy” …

  • avatar

    Honda can do great things. AMERICAN Honda looks for the bland among the flavor, omits the chocolate, peppers, and spice, and sends us tapioca and vanilla, in three shades of off white and grey. I still have some german Honda catalogs that show yes, they can make great stuff…it is just not sold here.

    I look forward to the 15k ADP sticker.

    • 0 avatar
      AnotherMillenial

      Any hope said engineering could make it over to the ILX? A version of this as an Si is too deep in “not gonna happen” land.

      It’s funny that global Hondas usually ended up as Acuras. They seem to be doing a bit more to differentiate now, but your point remains.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      The European Civic Type-R isn’t much—if it all—nicer than our Si: suspension is a little less controlled and it makes a bit more power.

      Don’t be taken in by the unobtanium.

      The gap isn’t really that great, and, honestly, European Hondas are also “grandma” cars. This one is different, but I wouldn’t be surprised to see a turbo in the next Si or ILX.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Last generation, the euro type-r gave up the helical LSD and multilink IRS of our Si but gained a giant hole in its structure. The best thing I can say about Europeans is that they didn’t want one any more than I did.

      • 0 avatar
        spreadsheet monkey

        “European Hondas are also grandma cars”.

        Honda in Europe probably has a worse “old person” image in the UK than Buick did in the US ten years ago.

        The current range comprises the Jazz (Fit), Civic, CR-V, and a couple of hybrids which no-one buys. No more Accord or Legend.

        Until the new Civic Type R is launched, the most powerful engine in the current range is a 160bhp diesel, which is weak even by Euro standards. It really wasn’t that long ago that Honda sold the Integra, S2000 and Prelude over here, and was known for making “serious driver’s cars”.

  • avatar

    I am far from an expert, but I see the following
    – the most important reveal of Geneva thus far; actually, the only interesting one
    – as the car was getting heavy, they added power

  • avatar
    Beerboy12

    At least this car has a passing chance of making it to the US. The one I really want, the Renault Megan is unobtanium…

  • avatar
    calgarytek

    I’d like to see that dual axis front strut setup. And can I swap it in to the 8th gen Civic SI/Acura CSX/Acura ILX?

  • avatar
    Turbo Is Black Magic

    If this thing does sticker for what a top spec GTI goes for like the UK mags are saying and can pull a sub 7:54 ring time (skeptical) this will be a performance bargain.

    If only Honda of America would step up and demand of the overlords that it be sent here. If this really did sticker at top spec GTI prices ($32k) range I honestly would probably buy one.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      I call sheningans before it even hits the track. Ring time (which is kind of meaningless) of under 7:54:00 would best the previous fast FWD car by almost 22 seconds. The Renault Mégane RS R26.R did it in just under 8:18. The Chevrolet Cobalt SS (non GMPP trim) did just under 8:23. The Mazda MazdaSpeed Mazda3 (what an awful name) I believe is third place for a FWD car at 8:39 flat. The Focus ST in 2005 was faster than the Mazda3 but I can’t find anything to confirm/deny it was FWD vs AWD and I have to confess, I’m not 100% up on my Euro trim cars. So it is possible the Mazda is in 4th place – gladly corrected.

      7:54 would be equal to a Nissan GT-R, a 997, and faster than a F430 F1. It would be over 50 seconds faster than the last Civic R to take the track.

      Norfolk and Weigh.

      • 0 avatar
        Turbo Is Black Magic

        The current FWD record is 7:54.36 set by the Renault Megane RS 275 Trophy R… Honda has said this new Type R will best that record. If it does indeed do it, it will be a crazy performance bargain… we shall see.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          Holy crap the Megane RS 275 Trophy R seems so – pedestrian by the specs.

          Curb weight of 3000 pounds. 275 HP, 8.6:1 compression rate, 4 piston Brembos out front, solid disc in the rear, 6-speed manual, McPherson strut with double wishbone up front, torsion beam in the rear, 19″ rims with 235/35 rubber.

          On paper, this is definitely a hot hatch – but by the specs sure doesn’t come across as an under 8 minute around the Ring car.

          There must be some impressive engineering there – and of course the Aussies get it – but we don’t.

      • 0 avatar
        Turbo Is Black Magic

        It’s official this little winged wonder did a 7:50.63 on the ring, in other words it’s 21 seconds faster than the new AWD MK7 Golf R… this thing is legit.

        • 0 avatar
          superchan7

          20 seconds is within the margin of error for Ring times, so a 21-second difference must mean that the new Type R does have a performance advantage.

  • avatar

    Meanwhile, in the real world, here’s the first comment at Insty (http://pjmedia.com/instapundit/203192/):

    “Manual gearshift only? What am I, a cave man? :)

    I understand that some people still like having a manual transmission (even though these days they’re typically slower in a drag race, especially compared to dual-clutch jobs) but c’mon, give us an automatic option. We know Honda have automatic gearboxes that can handle that much power. My car has one…”

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