By on November 4, 2014

2015 Dodge Challenger Hellcat

Since the 2015 Dodge Challenger Hellcat roared at the 2014 New York Auto Show, enthusiasts have been waiting for the day the big cats would enter the showroom.

When ordering opened in October, so did the floodgates.

According to Allpar, Dodge CEO Tim Kuniskis reported over 4,000 orders for the $60,000 707-horsepower musclecar were taken as soon as ordering came online, with an additional 1,000-plus entered since then.

The brand knew demand would be strong, but it had no idea it would come in hot, too; Dodge initially planned to build just 1,200 units annually. There’s also a dealer incentive to get the Challenger Hellcat into customers’ hands as soon as possible so that more can be delivered to the showroom as production moves forward.

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100 Comments on “Dodge: Over 5,000 Challenger Hellcats Ordered Since October...”


  • avatar
    mikey

    Wow ! Kudos to Dodge. Its certainly not the car for me. I’m just happy that a vehicle like the Hellcat can still be bought. I guess 5000 buyers thought the same way.

    • 0 avatar
      challenger2012

      The guys at Dodge may have stumbled upon a way to make people, who would never ever consider buying a Dodge, actually consider a Dodge for their next purchase. None of the other manufacturers had the balls or brains to produce such a product at this price, and Dodge seems intent on getting as many Hellcats on the road as possible vs gathering dust in dealers’ show rooms with 20K or more mark ups. 707 HP has super star draw. And while most buyers, myself included, will not drive home in one of these, they may like the association of the Hellcat being sold by the brand they drive. Also, I can’t imagine Dodge would restrict this engine to the Challenger and Charger. It might find its way into trucks and maybe modified to be placed into the upper scale cars FCA makes.

    • 0 avatar
      challenger2012

      The guys at Dodge may have stumbled upon a way to make people, who would never ever consider buying a Dodge, actually consider a Dodge for their next purchase. None of the other manufacturers had the balls or brains to produce such a product at this price, and the Dodge seems intent on getting as many Hellcats on the road as possible vs gathering dust in dealers’ show rooms with a 20K or more mark up. 707 HP has super star draw. And while most buyers, myself included, will not drive home in one of these, they may like the association of the Hellcat being sold by the brand they drive. Also, I can’t imagine Dodge would restrict this engine to the Challenger and Charger. It might find its way into trucks and maybe modified to be placed into the upper scale cars FCA makes.

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      I just can’t see dropping $60-70k for this car. In the end, happy for Dodge to be able to produce it. Who knows, maybe this is the halo car as the Viper is barely produced.

      • 0 avatar
        superchan7

        I wouldn’t either; my interests lie in other types of cars (besides, 700 hp would get me in trouble very quickly).

        But this hits the right note for many buyers. An insanely powerful car that cruises great, is roomy inside, costs $60k? Heck yes?

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    I would bet serious money that upwards of 80% of these will be stored, and not driven, as an “investment” for future sale.

    And if I’m even remotely, roughly accurate in that estimation, that’s sad.

    • 0 avatar
      7402

      I’m not thinking it makes sense to buy and store one of these. At 5,000+ units it will be decades before it’s rare enough to have performed as an investment. This is not the next Ford GT.

      Still, folks will start wrecking these the first week they are on the road; anticipate brisk demand once that lovely motor becomes available for lumping into whatever is stored in the garage.

    • 0 avatar
      319583076

      I concur. These cars are strictly for boomer daddies and granddaddies that think someday when little Kayden/Hayden/Jayden grows up, he/she/it will appreciate it or be able to sell it to fund a nest egg or some other nonsense.

      Honestly, I’m over the Hellcat and the entire Challenger phenomenon. It’s not a great thing that these cars are widely available. They represent too much power available to too many people that can’t handle it. And…each one of these cars ties up resources that could arguably be better put to use elsewhere.

      It will never happen, but I would support legislation to strip driving privileges from Boomers at some pre-determined age – say 73 – primarily for public safety and secondarily to eliminate stupid, overpowered, river barge-like nostalgia machines.

      /rant

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        You pinko commie! Driving is a right and the only power of government to regulate it is for public safety. Arbitrarily pulling licenses by age, especially at 73, makes no sense and is an abuse of the government’s power.

        Until we see profile data of the buyers, I’ll assume you’re wrong about boomer daddies buying these muscle cars. The term is ‘enthusiasts’, and they come in all ages. Chances are, those sniveling dot-com billionaires in their 20s are well represented in the 5,000 buyers, as well as the Hollywood types who keep their Prius only for PR purposes.

        Finally, there’s no such thing as “too much power available to too many people”. You don’t know how much you can handle until you get behind the wheel, and you can LEARN to drive that power with proper training – just ask Jack Baruth.

        • 0 avatar
          Jack Baruth

          Since I was invoked in this conversation, I’ll note that the Hellcat is extremely pleasant to drive on the street and during Road and Track’s PCOTY process I saw plenty of average-skill drivers really enjoy it safely.

          :)

          • 0 avatar
            319583076

            I’m sure it is. One of the points I’m trying to make is that if you’re driving a Challenger on the street – the V6 model is more than enough. Let’s be honest – Hellcats are like Magnum condoms. All guys want to be seen with one because of the implications. However, everyone knows that the capacity exceeds the demand.

            Jack, if you’re dropping $70k on a street and track machine, do you buy a Hellcat?

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            “Hellcats are like Magnum condoms. All guys want to be seen with one because of the implications.”

            The “implications” being…?

            https://www.google.com/search?q=hummer+now+everyone+will+know

        • 0 avatar
          319583076

          Calling it arbitrary doesn’t make it arbitrary. At what point – on average – does a human being’s eyesight and reaction time deteriorate to such a point that they are endagering the public while at the controls of a 2-ton vehicle? 73 is a placeholder, data may show it is more or less than that, but it is not arbitrary. Randomly selecting any age between 16 and, say, 100 is arbitrary.

          Extrapolate that to the rest of your opinions. Your opinions are not facts or truths, especially not because you’ve posted them on the internet.

          • 0 avatar
            mikey

            @ 319583076..As a guy that has spent 60 plus years on the planet, I don’t think your idea is is all that crazy. Mandatory retesting at age 65 also sounds good.

            Problem is Dude! It aint never gonna happen. Even the dumbest elected official, {and there aint no shortage of them} doesn’t dare screw with old people…They always vote. They might not remember what they had for breakfast this morning. But they don’t ever forget, a poltico that screws them

          • 0 avatar
            wstarvingteacher

            Retesting is a fact here in Texas. For the first time I have to wear glasses. I understand I get to do that every two years when I hit 80.

            I’m 71 now and don’t know your age but I have some suggestions for you as well. There is something you could do in the privacy of your own home that would be anatomically impossible, however, knowing you tried would give me immense pleasure.

          • 0 avatar
            FormerFF

            If you’d look at the available data, you’d see that the fatality rate among older drivers starts to increase around age 80, partially because they start getting in more accidents, but mostly because injuries that a younger person can recover from will kill someone of that age.

            As far as being a hazard to others, it’s teenagers and young men that are the greatest risk.

            Mandatory retesting is a good idea. Yanking someone’s driving privileges at an arbitrary age is not. Yanking someone’s driving privileges at an arbitrary age based on someone’s personal prejudices is absurd.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          The Supreme Court has held repeatedly that the Constitution provides a right to travel between states and within a state.

          They have never held, and will never hold, that there is a right to do so *by driving.*

          Driving is a privilege which the state can regulate at will for any reason it likes. And I’d like to see stricter regulation that would keep both unsafe people and unsafe equipment off the roads. With 30,000+ annual deaths (more than ten 9/11s every year) we aren’t doing it right.

          • 0 avatar
            OneAlpha

            The only reason that driving isn’t protected by the Constitution the way firearms are is because the automobile didn’t exist when the Constitution was written.

            If cars had been around in the 18th century, they very well might’ve become a protected technology, on the grounds that personal liberty isn’t just secured by guns, but by mobility, and in a mechanized society, that means cars and trucks.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            OneAlpha,
            I don’t know where you get your facts, because the constitution is mute on the rights to own or use weapons.

            If you are referring to the second amendment, all it provides for is the right to go sleeveless, within the context of a state militia.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            “If you are referring to the second amendment, all it provides for is the right to go sleeveless, within the context of a state militia.”

            That’s just like, your opinion, man. The Supreme Court has a different one.

      • 0 avatar
        probert

        700hp is the bare minimum for a cosco run. What’s the problem?

    • 0 avatar
      wumpus

      Just how many cars gained 300% in the last 20 years? That’s what the S&P earned, and that’s pretty much a no-brainer (just buy the Vanguard fund). “Investing” in cars isn’t quite as bad as investing in seafood, but it’s close enough.

      Hint: buy iphones. You want something the current generation wants in their youth, so that when [if ever] they have money they will want to [re]buy to recapture their lost youth.

    • 0 avatar
      AJ

      My father-in-law has a collection of classic Dodge muscle cars, including three very rare ones. One is factory original with less then 50k miles on it. At one time it was a grocery getter, but thankfully it’s been mostly parked as it’s super cool to see. He also has a graveyard of cars that were not parked, that he’s been selling them off over the last month (he sold his auto body shop). They were driven into the dirt. Maybe some of them will be restored, but many probably not as they continue to rust away in a guy’s garage while is wife bitches at him about it…

      Anyway, I wish I could buy one too, but my wife told me I’d have to sell my Jeep! :(

  • avatar
    SaulTigh

    I wonder what the sweet spot will be for a used one? 3, maybe 4 years down the road? Next time gas spikes above $3.50 a gallon? I’d love to have one, but at half the price.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      A 1970 Challenger with the 440 6-pak went out the door for just under $6,000. That’s about $40,000 today. Only about 2,200 were built in 1970, so while you have to pay more today, you have a better chance of getting one.

  • avatar
    nguyenvuminh

    It’s not a matter of how much horsepower, it’s how the car’s chassis, suspension, brakes, etc. able to handle that much power without putting the car into a ditch. I don’t see Chrysler has a history of providing good handling cars and there’s nothing in their recent racing experience to say otherwise.

    • 0 avatar
      nickoo

      Huh?? The viper is legendary in racing circles. Rumor is that the next viper will be even more capable as a response to the zo6. SRT dropped out of race sponsership to fund the 15000 viper price cut, which was the right move If you look at sales. These hellcat cars were never meant to be anything beyond quarter mile drag racers.

      • 0 avatar
        energetik9

        The Viper may be legendary, but I question that. A viper racing platform is far removed from it’s street twin. Pretty much in name only. The Viper was also famous for slamming into stationary objects [email protected]@ end first. I suspect this car will be the same.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          “A viper racing platform is far removed from it’s street twin.” No, not really.

          The previous gen ACR in street trim set Nurburgring and Laguna Seca lap records. You can’t do that if the car can’t boogey in the turns.

          Honestly, where do you people get your info that the Viper isn’t a world class handler?

          • 0 avatar
            energetik9

            Where do I get my information. Mostly from my time driving a Viper.

            As far as the race versions (any platform) in Lemans and Tudor, have you looked at these cars close up? You must realize they are modified, engines detuned, etc.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      I’m not one to tell people what to do, buy, drive, etc., but I, too, am over the Hellcat (and I’m a fan of the platform, too).

      The Chrysler 300 chassis/platform makes for a solid, quiet, safe, comfortable cruiser at a good value, and a torque monster old school muscle car in SRT Challenger or Charger iterations.

      But 707 really makes no sense given the dimensions, brake & suspension parameters, etc.

      It’s battered, deep-fried sticks of butter.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      The Hellcat models have a substantially revised chassis and better brakes. I have no doubt that they’re capable of handling 707 horsepower. The issue is whether 707 horsepower can make them fun. I doubt it. They still weigh 4400-4600 pounds and have the footprint of large SUVs.

      • 0 avatar
        energetik9

        Which makes them great at spinning tires and drag races to the next stop light or down a straight road. The much weight will make them ackward at best around a corner at high speed.

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      There’s two possible meanings here; both coming across as ignorant to me:

      A. You think the car is so poorly engineered that one or more of the chassis, suspension, brakes, etc. (whatever that includes; I have no idea) are going to fail catastrophically and send the driver into the ditch.

      B. You’ve never been on a track and have no concept of what driving at the limit is like, or why street cars should have much different handling characteristics than race cars, so you don’t realize that it’s typically the driver that determines whether the car goes off track. I suspect that the handling of this car is capable and predictable, like all modern Challengers, and that’s all any competent driver needs to keep it on the pavement.

      • 0 avatar
        energetik9

        I’m not sure about the engineering comment. I assume that is directed at another poster. I’m confident that Dodge made adjustments to handle the output. Although I don’t care what car it is, time will tell and there are always weak points.

        In regards to the limits/track comment. I’ve spent years working in NASCAR and IndyCar. Even spent some time in Lemans and Tudor and even a few driving, performance, and track courses here and there. I’ve also owned (and currently own) a few high performance cars of the years. I will never call myself a race car driver and I am not trying to compare against any experience you have, but I think I have more familiarity and understanding a race dynamics than most. I have read mixed reviews on the handling capability of this car. I am very suspect of a car that pushes out that much HP, offset by that much weight. Simple dynamics tell me that weaknesses of this car will show up at a track or during spirited cornering on the road. You and I both know that HP measurement alone is a very shortsighted measurement on the performance of a car. I am also fully aware of the role a driver plays, but let’s face it, as a road car, most drivers won’t even hit that 80-90% range of performance and won’t see the limits of this car and in the end, won’t ever have any issues. Price dynamics alone tell me the average buyer of this car is likely in their 50’s-60’s, not some 20 year old experiencing a high output car for the first time.

        • 0 avatar
          rpn453

          My comment was in response to nguyenvuminh. It’s not easy to tell which comment a person hit the “Reply” button for. I guess I should go back to copy-pasting the quote.

          I don’t disagree with your comments, energetik9. While a nose-heavy musclecar doesn’t compare well with a rear-biased sports car like the Viper, both examples have enough power to overwhelm most drivers if they’re not cautious and I’m sure a few will be destroyed because of that. Really, with this sort of power, almost anyone could get themselves in trouble if they don’t respect it at all times. A regular SRT8 Challenger would be more than enough muscle for me, and I’d appreciate the lighter weight. But this relatively understeery Hellcat will certainly be more forgiving than if it were set up for the more neutral handling that a skilled racer might prefer on the track.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      American roads are generally wide and flat. This thing was not built for threading needles… it was built for wrinkling drag strip asphalt and giving GT-Rs a scare on highway rolls. Methinks you miss the point completely.

  • avatar
    nickoo

    The hellcat is capable, but the smart buy is the scat pack version, by far the best bang for the buck.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    Power to the people, baby!

    I like how this beast is widely avalible, not just some limited production run. Really fits with Dodge’s image. The working man’s muscle car.

  • avatar
    3Deuce27

    So much for the ‘rarity’ and ‘Collectible’ status if Dodge continues to take all orders on this phony ‘HEMI’.

    Sounds like it already exceeded the total production the SVO in its 2-1/2 year run in only the first week.

    And, yes, they won’t get driven much as in a few years there will be a huge annual carbon penalty tax on big V-8’s and other vehicles that suck fuel at a prodigious rate.

    COL!

    • 0 avatar
      superchan7

      I don’t recall Chrysler intending to produce the Hellcat with the primary function being exclusivity.

      Also, I don’t see anything “phony” about an engine that puts out over 700 horsepower. I’m not a muscle car fan, but that doesn’t make these cars any less awesome.

      Perhaps you’re referring to the “Hemi” name and the not-so-hemi engine head design, but that’s nothing compared to BMW calling a 2.0 Turbo engine “_28i” and Mercedes-Benz calling a 6.2L engine a “6.3”.

    • 0 avatar
      ellomdian

      Common fallacy. People are ordering these like they will be collectible some day, just like people bought every holo-foil variant of a comic in the 90’s.

      The difference is the car stands a better chance of getting you laid today than the comics ever did.

      Seriously though, I am super happy to see Chrysler step up to the demand – having this be just-another-COPO style car is awesome. If you want one, and you have the money (and it’s not that much money, seriously) you can get one.

  • avatar
    theupperonepercent

    Enter a new era of high speed car accidents!

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      What? Pure assumption on your part. You should look closer at the whole collection of high power cars on the road today. This car will have zero impact on your premise.

      • 0 avatar
        superchan7

        Any bro-dawg vehicle will see certain numbers in pieces all over the road (or forest). Hellcats would be no exception.

        Examples:
        Older M3s
        Hayabusas (or any sport bike)
        STis and Evos
        Stangs/Camaros

        They don’t, however, represent a statistically significant portion of buyers.

  • avatar
    jrmason

    A lot of haters here. If the Hellcat is too much manliness for you pocket protector loving types, then don’t buy one. I promise I won’t point and laugh when I pass you in your Prius.

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      I appreciate it for what it is. Just a zero desire to own one. I already own a high performance spors car that weighs far less than this portly beast. Feel free to throw in a Prius joke, but I do not drive one. I prefer my cars to more performance oriented and in a more complete performance package. 4500-4600 pounds relegates this to a fast mover in a straight line all in a package that looks pretty much the same as the base model. I would have more fun with half the weight and 1/3 the hp.

      Again, more power to it and more power to Dodge, I just don’t get it.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Or, here in Seattle where it’s damp most of the time, I promise I won’t point and laugh when I beat your Hellcat off the line in my turbo Forester.

      (True story. My wife, driving the Fozzy, has left me in my G8 GXP in the dust twice because of lack of wet traction.)

      The problem with the Hellcat is it’s just a numbers exercise, far removed from what’s really fun on the street.

    • 0 avatar
      OneAlpha

      Not pocket protector types – more like metrosexuals, The Enlightened, modernists and those who judge other people’s possessions and purchases by the concept of “need.”

      To say nothing of those who believe that a loud, powerful vehicle is “compensating for something.”

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “If the Hellcat is too much manliness”

      Traction control, stability control, heated and ventilated Nappa leather seats, 8.4in touch screen entertainment. It’s a cool car but it is hardly a Shelby Cobra or Super Duty Catalina.

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        If you are going to crow about your manliness, you need to:
        1. actually own the vehicle in question,
        2. prove you can truly drive the vehicl, preferably with a manual transmission, and
        3. state your case without insulting people who make different choices.

        In which case, you wouldn’t feel the need to crow about your manliness, and you would stop whining about how everyone thinks you’re compensating for something.

        • 0 avatar
          jrmason

          Even the most indirect ribbing always results in an overheated pencil sharpener or two as The rebuttals are whittled out. Lighten up! My statement was not an insult it was a response to the naysayers who say this car should not be built. Bottom line is it’s a very specific market that has a steadily growing fan base. It’s not for everybody, just like a minivan isn’t for me. As for my qualifications, I could list them for you but I don’t want it to seem like I’m bragging over the measurement of certain body parts.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    Ha! Haters gonna hate. They’ll rag on something for not selling enough and call it a failure. When it sells like crazy, it lame because it’s too common.

    There’s clearly a lot of buyers who see the performance value here and are jumping on it, I don’t blame them one bit. I look forward to buying their twisted remants for sweet sweet donor parts.

  • avatar
    JGlanton

    5000 people in Hellcats? I love my fellow man!

  • avatar
    jrmason

    Exactly.The Hellcats are a real game changer. More horsepower than a Lambo at a 1/4 of the price. Before anybody starts crowing about how you get what you pay for, consider this when comparing the Hellcat to any high end sports car. You are absolutely paying for the name and heritage and high performance materials such as carbon fiber and exotic metal alloys to shave a few pounds off the curb weight. This is all fine and dandy but realistically how many of us on this forum could afford to have a quarter million dollar car sitting in their garage? I bet there are VERY few. Enter the Hellcat with a much more affordable carbon steel frame and sheet metal. They focused on the key elements of building a muscle car in the drive train and suspension and left the rest alone and the result is an entry level high performance car that is within the reaches of middle class America. IMO The Hellcat platform has Fiat written all over it. Fiat also has stakes in Ferrari and Maserati and they certainly have the ability to design a performance chassis to handle the power. I think it’s a great platform.

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    With the Hellcat your basically telling every other driver on the road to go f#$k themselves without saying a word or raising your middle finger! I love it!………..LOL

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      There are plenty of cars on the road that essentially do the same. Importantly, that “go f#$K yourself” you message you reference is only sent if 1) The other driver even cares (most won’t), 2) The other driver even knows what you are driving (I bet 80%-90% of drivers won’t even recognize one of these on the road) and 3) If there really is an actual advantage over the other car (I’m sure plenty of sports car owners would not see an advantage to the Hellcat over what they are driving).

    • 0 avatar
      superchan7

      Most drivers will barely notice a Hellcat. Maybe an “Oh, that’s an interesting shade of green.”

      The smug guy is the one who is under the self-created delusion that other people care about what he drives. That applies to everything from sports cars to lifted trucks to Priuses.

      There are exceptions, such as the higher-level exotics.

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      You’re thinking of lifted pickups with blue headlights and a loud exhaust. Nobody that isn’t into cars will even notice the Challenger. Well, unless you put a loud exhaust on it. But then you’d probably still need the blue headlights for that finger to even be noticeable.

  • avatar
    Boxerman

    Many cars have their own unique appeal. While I love my lotus for backroads a challenger has it own appeal for the big open highway, horeses for courses. The V8 challengars are the synthesis of everythign that made the old personal coupe category of american cars so great, but the chalengaers can also brake and go round bends.

    From my exoperience the regular v8 challengers are sorta fast, but other cars are a lot fatser, think AMG mercedes for exampole. What makes the hellcat appealing, it has upgraded suspension and brakes and probably plenty of pwer anytime just like an amg mercedes. Its an extreme vehicle, just as any exotic is.

    As to how they are on track, its irrelevant these are not track cars, nor is an aventador, they are road cars, and everythign I have read indicates they have more than ample suspemnsion and brakes to cope with road conditions given theri power.

    They are dinosaurs, the sythesis of everything that once made american cars great with all the convenience and saftey of a modern, when they are gone we will not see their likes again.

    Probably anybody would have been satisfied with a scat pak, but now that the hellcat is out why not have nmore.

    As to their being put away. Not necessarily true, they may not be daily drivers, but many special cars are driven like motorcycles, 1-3k per year for many many years, that probably is the fate of hellcats, certainly what I would do with mine.

    Perfomance and size sell, this is no more riduiculous than a raptor, another exceptionaly cool and sucessful quintessentialy american vehicle.

    These are not everyday cars, they are special occasion vehicles, kudos to chryco for produicing it. Do otehr cars weigh less, handle and brake betetr yes look at a Macklaren 650’s, but a hellcat has a good balance of power and handling to be quite driveable.

    get one while you can.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    That means about 2,500 of these magnificent engines will be available in a junkyard near you – if you don’t mind the embedded phone pole, oak tree, fence post, speed limit sign, and some partial brain matter.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      This is what happened to a Ferrari on a road near me. The scary part of this incident is that my daughter commutes to and from school on the same road.

      http://www.boston.com/cars/news-and-reviews/2014/10/20/dead-after-ferrari-crashes-middleton/ugwyY5GeTDJKjVwS2y6K7N/story.html

  • avatar
    superchan7

    5000 pre-orders means there will be many thousands more in the production run.

    Cars that are immediately collectible are only produced in the hundreds (see the halo cars from Ferrari). Anything else is pure guessing and would be poor investment by any standard.

    These cars will be drivers. I’ll bet most will not be DDs, but driven a few times a week for leisure.

    Maybe in 15-30 years they’ll recover from depreciation and go from there.

  • avatar
    energetik9

    What confuses me the most about the Hellcat is how much traction in the media this car gets. There are other high performance cars out there and others that will match 0-60 times. The first counter arguement will be price, but what about the Mustang RTR as just one example. It’s (from what I understand) a $20k permium and offers 725hp. To each their own, but chasing HP does not a better car make.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      There’s a big difference between tuner cars with questionable build quality and reliability and something engineered and warranted by the factory. There’s never been a factory 700 hp sedan before. Ever. And there’s never been a coupe with this much power anywhere near this price category.

      (Of course, as my earlier comments make clear, that still doesn’t mean I want one).

      • 0 avatar
        SayMyName

        “There’s a big difference between tuner cars with questionable build quality and reliability and something engineered and warranted by the factory.”

        When it’s a Fiatsler factory you’re referring to, I tend to place greater trust in individual tuners.

      • 0 avatar
        energetik9

        I agree on tuner cars and not really a fan in general. But to complete my point, the Mustang RSR is a box check straight from the factory (as far as I understand).

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          No, it’s a car sold through Ford dealers, but developed and warranted by a tuner. I wouldn’t expect a factory level of finish or durability.

        • 0 avatar
          3Deuce27

          Driveable High Hp American coupes/Pony’s are nothing new and tuner/fabricators have been building these cars for the OEM’s for years,now.

          For a few years now, Hennessy has been building highly streetable Camaro’s with HP figures exceeding the Hellcat’s numbers, and those Camaro’s get around a corner with alacrity and the brakes will plant your face on the windshield all while hauling around about 600 pounds less mass. That 600 pounds makes a big difference.

          700Hp is a big deal, but 4,500 pounds dampens the equation considerably in real world dynamics.

          HPE800> http://www.hennesseyperformance.com/hpe800camaro.html

          HPE1000!> http://www.hennesseyperformance.com/hpe1000camaro.html

          • 0 avatar
            319583076

            “That 600 pounds makes a big difference.”

            Like Colin Chapman said, “Add power and you can go faster in the straights. Remove weight and you can go faster everywhere.”

            Hellcat power doesn’t change physics…

    • 0 avatar
      superchan7

      700 hp from a factory car, under six figures. Those are headline numbers, and IMO deservedly so.

      • 0 avatar
        energetik9

        We all know that really HP means nothing by itself. Throw in good torque numbers and good handling numbers and you have something. Chasing HP is like chasing megapixels in photography. Good to a point and then useless on the top end. And in regards to my previous argument, there are other cars with high performance numbers and under 100k. Again, my Mustang RSR example. 725hp, under 100k. It’s not the only game in town and my gut tells me the Mustang is a better performer.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      Everyone’s excited because not only is 700hp available in a family sedan and pony car, they’re priced within reach of the common man. 700hp super cars that cost six digits or more will pique some lust in the average enthusiast, but knowing that he has the chance to acutally afford it will really get his blood pumping.

  • avatar
    nickoo

    I would love to see this race a Tesla dual drive around a road course. Battle of the sports sedans!

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      I’d like to see that battle too! The Tesla has the advantage of all wheel drive and a lower center of gravity. I’m not sure the Hellcat would have much of a chance if the drivers are evenly matched.

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      That comparison doesn’t even make any sense. Battle a true sports sedan like a BMW M5, or a Mercedes AMG. How about a 300 R/T. There are much better choices.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        If the Tesla P85D isn’t a “true sports sedan,” nothing is. 0-60 in 3.2 seconds, quarter mile in the elevens, and nearly 1.0 g of grip.

        • 0 avatar
          jrmason

          The technology of the Tesla is cutting edge and very impressive, but if I had $130k to spend on a sports car would not be an electric car. First off, I’m pretty sure the dealer support pretty much sucks in good ol’
          O-H-I-O, LOL. Second, even though 300 miles is an impressive range for an electric car your done after that(and it’s realistically more like 225-250 depending on driving conditions). They are neat and I’m sure the wave of the future, but for now I’ll stick to my oil burners.

        • 0 avatar
          energetik9

          I love the Tesla. They are everywhere here where I live in Chicago. I see probably upwards of 5 of these a day. Beautiful car and glad to see it produced. Performance aside, I just have a hard time classifying this as a “sports sedan”. I see it more in the luxury space than performance space, maybe more of a sport tourer in line with a BMW 6 series. Another example, I live in an affluent area and I see Bently Continental GTs all the time. A 600hp car, yet I don’t classify this as a sports car even though a variant of this car races in the Tudor series.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      Simple strategy. Drive just hard enough to drain the Tesla battery and drive away for the win.

  • avatar
    jrmason

    The Teslas 0-60 times are so impressive because of an electric motors ability to produce 100% torque @ low rpm. But stretch it out over a 1/4 mile and a performance production car (like the Hellcat) will be right there with it.

  • avatar
    JimC2

    Wow, a lot of gnashing of teeth over a few themes here.

    If your personal idea of the “pursuit of happiness” is a car like this, then go for it! I actually can afford one but it’s not my thing. I’ll still probably give you a thumbs up if I see you driving it.

    If it bothers you when people poke fun at the stereotype* for your favorite choice of vehicle, all I can say is grow a thicker skin and stop worry about what you think the other guy thinks of you. Sticks and stones, remember that?

    *No matter what that stereotype- macho man compensating for a small weewee, limp-wristed granola eater, tree hugger in comfortable shoes, metro chick magnet, cougar magnet, whatever. Get over yourself. Sheesh!

  • avatar
    cbrworm

    I would love to have the Charger version as a family sedan. But, I like to drive my cars hard, and I honestly think that having 400ft-lbs of torque at 1,200 RPM would make it a very boring car to drive at a moderately fast pace.

    I should test drive one though to make sure.

  • avatar
    3Deuce27

    The game ain’t over to the fat lady sings.

    Ford prepares to up the anty on 2015 Mustang performance with a Roush Super Charger package for the GT offered through Ford Racing, but will it, in light of the Hellcat, migrate to a complete OEM model.

    At an estimated 624-640Hp, the Mustang has a power to weight advantage over the Hellcat, and it will go around corners like a cat after a mouse. Of course a Hennessey Camaro will best both of them, but a test of a the new package with some other treatments, produced a run of 10.97 when fitted with this new street friendly blower setup.

    At and estimated package cost of around $8,000/plus installation, the cost per HP advantage goes to the Mustang, leaving enough bucks to do additional chassis enhancements and brake work while still coming in at a lower price then a Hellcat, especially as most Hellcats will carry added cost with ADM/ADP.

    See more at: http://www.torquenews.com/106/2015-mustang-gt-gets-600-horsepower-ford-racing#sthash.j5f0Eodj.dpuf

    http://www.torquenews.com/106/2015-mustang-gt-gets-600-horsepower-ford-racing

    • 0 avatar
      jrmason

      Yawn.

      I owned a GT and a Cobra of different generations and the suspension was washy At best. I recently rode in a friends 13 and not much has changed. And while Ford stretches the horsepower limits of the 5.0 The 6.4 Hellcat is sitting at a detuned 707HP, down from the original 850 Chrysler had the early prototypes at. Theres no replacement for displacement.

      • 0 avatar
        3Deuce27

        I owned an SVO and a 2000 Cobra ‘R’, and neither were bothered by ‘washy’ suspension, other Mustangs did have their handling issues and some of the late ones were quite capable in a crude sort of way. As good as they(SVO/’R’) were, the new 2015 Mustang is a whole other animal when it comes to handling.

        And nobody ‘yawns’ at 600+ Hp. especially if it results in a 5.75/1 pds to Hp ratio_Mustang with Ford/Roush supercharger pkg. The Hellcat as advertised, is only…LOL! 6.5/1. LOL! cuzz nobody can laugh at that ‘only’ ratio of pounds to Horsepower, except F1_750Hp_2.0/1 and LMP1 drivers_2.8/1, and Hennessey Camaro drivers who have 800Hp_4.75/1 to 1,000Hp_3.8/1 Hp available.

        Oh! And me. My old Sevenesque has a ratio of 3.75/1 with a traction limited 2.8 seconds to 60mph.

        To my way of thinking, the new Kawasaki H2 is a bigger deal then a Hellcat, it will find like company with my old H1 and H2, 750 Turbo, and Hayabusa.

  • avatar
    jrmason

    There is a road course that I have frequented over the years and I have ran several of my cars there. Nothing competitive, the track opens up periodically for enthusiasts to run a few solo laps.I was particularly fond of my Cobra but when pushed hard in the corners it had some less than favorible understeer. I’ve ran low end Porsche’s, modified Supras and 280 and 300zx’s on that track and they all handled better than either of my Mustangs. We’re talking cars that are 2 decades older.
    Remember the Honda NS400R (2stroke)? I had an 85, it was a scary fast bike with a sketchy powerband in it’s day.

    • 0 avatar
      3Deuce27

      No argument that a lighter ‘sports car’ will out handle a 2-dr saloon, but Ford has majorly changed the handling capabilities with the new generation Mustang.

      Reg; “Remember the Honda NS400R (2stroke)?”… Yes, and I
      have an example of its direct competitor in my bike collection, the two-stroke, twin crank, 1987 Suzuki RG500 ‘Gamma’ that I imported from Canada in the late 80’s. They were never sold here in the US.

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