By on August 28, 2014

2015_Ford_F-150_Pickup_Truck

Did you put in your order for the new aluminum 2015 Ford F-150? If so, you may be waiting a bit longer to join the Overlord of Truck Mountain in its court.

Automotive News reports all fleet and some retail consumers who put their orders in early will be waiting until February 2015 for delivery, according to a leaked dealer memo issued August 20.

The delay is due to the automaker ensuring the launch of its newest truck will go better than when the 2013 Lincoln MKZ stumbled out of the gate early last year, as explained in the memo:

We understand the desire to get the customer units as quickly as possible, but do not want to compromise our commitment to quality for the sake of a few additional weeks of delivery.

Those who are waiting until the F-150’s showroom arrival will have better luck, as all 3,000 of the Blue Oval’s dealers will receive a handful or two of the new pickup near the end of the year, with the first pre-production units expected to roll off the line near the end of October.

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33 Comments on “2015 Ford F-150 Customer Orders Delayed Until February...”


  • avatar
    VoGo

    If I were Fields, this launch would absorb 100% of my attention. Ford has GOT to get this right.

  • avatar
    Detroit-X

    ‘Operation Cowpie’ requires Fields for success.

  • avatar
    HerrKaLeun

    Regardless of brand, one always skips the first model year to avoid bugs.

    I rather have a delay than a bad product.

    • 0 avatar

      There’s a counterargument to that. Sometimes an automaker will release a new or redesigned model, but will delay iffy or troublesome features because they want to buoy their initial quality rankings. I believe that BMW did just that when they released the E70 X5 for MY2007, but delayed the air-suspension option until the next model year.

      But…in favor of *your* argument, sometimes after the first year, the automaker will install an option or a mechanical part that’s not a reliability problem or correction, but that should have been there from the get-go. When Buick released the eighth-generation Riviera for MY1995, it had the older keyless-entry system, the “Series I” 3800 engine, and a blander dashboard. I don’t believe it had full OBD-II either. In MY1996, the Riviera got a bunch of upgrades to rectify all that. Two more-recent GM examples I can provide are the addition of a manual transmission to the SS for MY2015, and a new 8-speed in the trucks for MY2015.

      • 0 avatar
        Chopsui

        Sometimes, they’ll also start doing cost reductions like cheaper plastics, fewer options, etc. Although I don’t know if it typically starts in the second year.

      • 0 avatar
        Mr. Bill

        As the owner of a ’95 Riviera, you are correct on what you are saying. It has still been a good car, but I do draw up a little when the parts man at the local GM dealership goes looking for parts….

        Mr. Bill

  • avatar
    rpol35

    I know styling is subjective, and I’m not a truck guy, but that’s about the ugliest thing on wheels I have ever seen.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      As that model is a main-line XLT, and not a cowboy-poseur King Ranch or gaudy Platinum, nor a fleet-queen XL, I have to disagree with you. The middle-model F-150 has never looked any less than decent.

      Except those rims–they’d have to go.

      • 0 avatar
        crtfour

        The rims look like they were lifted from the Taurus.

      • 0 avatar
        JImJa

        FYI, those rims are optional. Styling – including rims – is subjective. Clearly Ford has made the new F150 look massive in order to be on the same page as Dodge. Whether or not you like that or not, well, the market will decide. I’m not crazy about the looks, but there are significant pluses like the 2.7 and AL body. The MPG thing also has to weigh on Ford Admin too. Particularly with Dodge’s 28 on their light weight diesel. I’m not much of a Dodge fan, but they pretty much own NW Wyoming where I live. Chevy is next. The nearest Ford dealer is 130 miles away.

    • 0 avatar

      That particular truck isn’t all that attractive, but I’ve seen a bunch of the 2015s up close and in person. They look like F-150s, they’ll do just fine.

    • 0 avatar
      crtfour

      I’m a “truck guy” but just can’t warm up to today’s truck styling, especially with all the chrome. I miss the clean truck styling from the 80’s and 90’s. I currently have a ’97 T100. Nothing fancy, but I love the simple and clean lines.

    • 0 avatar

      I also disagree. Normally trucks are kind of basic and lowbrow-looking, but Ford really took the time to make this one look upscale and interesting, even in plebeian trims like this XLT. I think it’s quite eye-pleasing. I might not even be upset when I end up staring at one because it’s two feet behind my rear bumper on the highway, when I’m already moving at a brisk pace.

      But yeah, those wheels would have to go. I’d order a different set.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    What was the % of total profits that the F Series P/U contributes to a) Ford’s North American operations, and b) Ford’s global operations, again?

    It was at least 88% in North America, if I’m not mistaken, and may have been as high on a global basis (given weak or even loss-inducing results in Europe and elsewhere).

    This truck had better underpromise and overdeliver given the light duty P/U truck competition (and production capacity, ala incentive wars).

    • 0 avatar

      Any percentage you see is a guess, Ford keeps that info very very secret. But all agree that the F-Series accounts for the majority of Ford profits in North America, and North America is carrying the whole company at the moment.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      90% of global profits was the Morgan Stanley estimate a few years ago. That included the entire F-series line and the Navigator/Expedition. Ford has tried to bring that number down. Until last quarter, Ford hadn’t made money in Europe in over three years. Because European losses offset any profit globally, Ford has been very dependent on North American profits in general.

      I’d like to see what the number is now. I’d bet any automaker is on a single product, but the Ford is more dependent on the F-series than percentage should have gone down.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @DeadWeight,
      You’ll find that the full size pickups overall in the US make a profit around the size of the tax protecting them, 25%.

      Cars are the same their tax is around what’s protecting them, 2%.

      So, long as the protection is offered to these vehicles, they will not lose money, they will just cost more.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        @BAFO – What does 2% do to “protect” US cars, like the Accord, Camry, Elantra, Civic, Corolla, Altima, Sonata, Taurus, Sentra, Cruze, Malibu, Subaru, Mazda, BMW, VW etc?

        And “protect” them from what exactly? Peugeot? Renault? Tata??

        By the same token, what are US pickups, like the Titan, Frontier, Tacoma, Tundra, Sierra, Silverado, Canyon etc, “protected” from???

        And would the profitability of US pickups be zero without the Chicken tax? And is this the same Chicken tax that allowed the ’80s mini-truck craze/fad/market trend to flourish like insanity??????

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      These things are enormously profitable because only a modest amount of additional spending is required to turn a $25,000 truck into a $50-60,000 luxury good. The willingness of higher-end truck buyers to pay high markups for the extras is one of the wonders of the auto industry.

      The marginal profits are surely impressive on the higher-end trucks. In contrast, the base models are probably only barely profitable.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    So, the Morgan Stanley analysis was extrapolation and wasn’t based on any concrete numbers provided by Ford?

    Thanks to both you, John, and bball, too.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Correct, like John said, Ford keeps all that information private.

      However, we can all agree that the percentage of Ford’s total profits based on the F-series is SIGNIFICANT.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      I keep hearing the 90% number time and time again.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        That’s because everyone reprints the Morgan Stanley estimate from a few years ago. I’ve not seen anyone else publish their own estimate. Articles always say, “Morgan Stanley estimate….” What MS basically did was put a number on how much they thought Ford made per F-series truck/SUV, and then multiplied it by sales. That number was 90% of Ford’s yearly profit.

  • avatar
    gregaryous

    Most all auto makers earn the majority of their profits from North America and the Big-3 are all dependent on trucks to support them.

    The 2015 F150 will be a Grand Slam for Ford because of all the innovation in this truck… For years!!!!

    • 0 avatar
      bosozoku

      Unless there are unforeseen reliability or design issues, of course. Even with today’s engineering and manufacturing methods, these things are not impossible.

  • avatar

    That’s good. Ford has learned its lesson. I’m far more of a GM person myself, but Ford has historically had better timing than GM as far as what products are appropriate for the market and how to make sure that they are as well-received as possible. GM, on the other hand, is usually playing catch-up, and that’s probably going to be the case here as well.

    Meanwhile, I have at least six friends who are all lined up to pay through the nose for these new F-150s when they finally arrive. I think it’s a pretty impressive truck myself; Ford sure isn’t resting on its laurels.

  • avatar
    65corvair

    Ford couldn’t get my ’11 Fiesta right, already in production a couple of years elsewhere in the world. Old tech. All new technology with the pickup. I would be very afraid. I would have done it more gradually. Aluminum hood, doors and box. They bet the company on the truck and they are going to lose.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Historically speaking, given that this is a Ford redesign (and to add to that, incorporating a newly integrated VERTICAL [i.e. not just hood] aluminum body panel system), the early buyers will be beta testers for the real world, and are more statistically likely than not to take some serious lumps for their willingness to be guinea pigs.

      I sincerely hope Ford pulls off a halfway decent launch of a relatively trouble free (at least of major systems) vehicle, but sadly, alas, history and statistics are not on their side.

      I’d never buy a first year model vehicle from any automaker other than Honda, and even then, only with a manual transmission (Honda’s motors are pretty much bulletproof across the board).

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @DeadWeight – I agree that it is best to stay away from first run “anything”.
        I bought a 2010 F150 and got a great deal. It has had no problems and statistically it has been much more reliable as a model year than subsequent F150’s.
        Even with that being said, Ford does have durability ratings better than Ram. Even the 6.7 Power Stroke SD has better ratings than Ram Cummins combo.

  • avatar
    bomberpete

    I don’t always agree with DeadWeight, but I think he’s right on the money here. I suspect 2016 F-150 and Mustang buyers will be much happier than those who bought 2015 models.

    • 0 avatar
      Ion

      I sort of strategically planned my lease out this way so the 13 will go back when the 16s are out. That said the rumor is the 16 will get some new powertrains. But I’m hoping the 5.0 remains relatively unchanged.

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