By on August 9, 2017

Jeep Trackhawk

Jeep announced pricing for the Grand Cherokee Trackhawk this week and whether it’s a good value or not largely depends on your priorities. At $85,900 with an additional $1,095 destination charge, it’s essentially the same price as the Dodge Demon before dealer markups. That’s roughly $20,000 over Dodge’s four-door Charger SRT Hellcat, which uses the same supercharged 6.2-liter V8 engine delivering an identical 707 horsepower.

So, how do you plate the price to make it appear more appetizing? Direct comparisons. Midsize performance SUVs sit in an odd category almost entirely dominated by premium German vehicles and two less-lavish American models using a seven-year-old platform derived with help from Daimler. What sets the Trackhawk apart is it’s the most bonkers of the bunch and manages its madness at a lower price point than the competition. 

Jeep Trackhawk

The BMW X5 M is debatably the best example in the segment. But it starts at over three figures and only delivers a lousy 567 horsepower with a top speed of 150 mph. While that might be fine if you want to convey your family across town quickly, it doesn’t ensure the same panicked screams as the Trackhawk’s 180 mph. The BMW may have superior curb appeal and a much nicer interior but it won’t terrify your children like the Jeep can — making it an invaluable parenting tool.

It’s a similar story for the rest of the performance SUV segment. You’ll always come up short on performance and, when you try, you’ll inevitably push yourself beyond the $100,000 mark.

Jeep Trackhawk

According to FCA, the eight-speed all-wheel-drive Trackhawk’s supercharged V8 propels it to 60 mph in about 3.5 seconds and through the quarter mile in 11.6 — absolutely obliterating everything else in its category. Upgraded Brembo brakes, the largest ever fitted to a Jeep’s front end, allegedly bring the vehicle to a stop quicker than either the Durango SRT or Grand Cherokee SRT. Riding an inch closer to the ground than either, it also possesses Jeep’s Selec-Trac system, Bilstein adaptive damping, unique 20 x 10-inch titanium-finish wheels, yellow brake calipers, a redesigned fascia, and four exhaust ports.

However, if you want to upgrade the interior, you’ll have to shell out some extra dough. Among the most desirable options are likely Jeep’s dual-pane panoramic sunroof and towing package — assuming you want to take advantage of its 7,200-pound towing capabilities. Other premium options include a Harman Kardon high-performance audio system, dual-screen rear-seat entertainment with Blu-ray, lightweight forged aluminum black wheels, dark red seat belts, and a fully wrapped leather interior package in either black or black/dark red.

Jeep Trackhawk

Color options for 2018 include Billet Silver, Granite Crystal, Diamond Black, Ivory Tri-coat, Bright White, Velvet Red, True Blue and two exclusive colors: Rhino (which has to be non-metallic gray) and Redline 2.

Jeep says it will begin taking orders for the Trackhawk on August 10th.

Jeep Trackhawk

[Images: FCA]

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32 Comments on “2018 Jeep Grand Cherokee Trackhawk Costs the Same As a Dodge Demon...”


  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    More utility + same powertrain as DEMON + same price as DEMON = likely even more popular than DEMON

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Where’s BTSR when you need him?

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    I find nothing in all of autodom more pointless than a “high performance” SUV. I’ve driven an X5M, it goes like He!!, stops, and turns, but it also rides like the shocks are bars of chrome steel, and you had better have stock in a good tire company. And your own personal oil well. If you want to go fast, it sure works a lot better to keep the CoG and weight down where they belong. No free lunch. The automotive equivalent of an F4 Phantom (i.e. you can make anything fly if you strap big enough engines to it).

    And I agree with PDan, it will certainly outsell the Demon. Which IMHO is pointless, but at least has a singular purpose that I can admire a little bit.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      ” it goes like He!!, stops, and turns, but it also rides like the shocks are bars of chrome steel, and you had better have stock in a good tire company. And your own personal oil well. ”

      How is this any different from a 700 HP sports car, besides the ability to not need another car? And the whole “get a sports car and a regular car” thing is kind of bogus too. For example I only have 2 spots in my garage and we park in the winter. What then?

      I came into this comment thread to say the opposite- after driving my wife’s MKX I totally get the hi po SUV thing. It specifically is hampered by unusually high curb weight (4400lb vs ~3900 for a Murano or Santa Fe Sport) but it handles decently. It actually has good turn in and steering feel. With less weight, more power and more grip the high CoG wouldn’t be that big of a deal. The X5M will twirl around a skidpad at 0.96 g… the days of flippy dippy Suzuki Samurais are dead and buried.

      If anything the Demon is the pointless one. And I doubt the Challenger/Charger Hellcats handle much better.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        The difference is that an M5, which is just as fast, won’t beat up your kidneys with the ride, won’t tear up tires at quite so fast a rate, and only needs you to have a half share in that oil well by comparison. An MKX is not even in the same realm as something like this. And to get the X5M to go around corners, the whole thing is lowered to the point that the “utility” in SUV is right out the window. And tires that are useful in snow are not going to have enough grip to deal with the power and the weight. Much of the magic of these tanks is in the super sticky, super expensive, super short lived tires they are fitted with at the factory.

        If you want to go fast, get something that is actually intended to go fast. A really fast pig isn’t a racehorse, it’s still just a fast pig.

        A 400hp SUV is still plenty stupid fast for what it is, and doesn’t need nearly the level of compromise in the aspects that make an SUV actually useful. I find 185hp to be more than adequate in my Land Rover Disco, I don’t need to go fast in a garden shed on wheels. Tows a 7000lb boat as quickly as I am willing to tow 7000lbs, what more do you need?

        • 0 avatar
          Aqua225

          Not everyone who buys these machines plan to drive it like a hot rod at all times.

          However, it is nice to have the horsepower on tap in a large towing vehicle, because you ain’t going to do much short gap passing with 185 hp.

          I have a large truck, which I can afford to fuel because I work from home, and don’t drive much, with a lot of h.p. (well, not as of 2017, but it’s still a 6sec 4wd). When I am latched on to a heavy object, it’s nice to be able to get some real go (and not just show) when on country roads. A placid pass, may become something a bit more rushed at just the wrong time.

          That’s when you want something with some real teeth.

          I do not drive my big truck like a sports car either, but I do like a bit of spirited straight line acceleration when there is little traffic in front.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            Nobody is towing anything with an X5M. Or this thing. I will be hugely surprised if the tow rating on these isn’t “not recommended”. We are talking about a vehicle with *700hp* – this is so far beyond what is needed for rapid passing it can’t even see it from here. These things are a physics experiment gone stupid. How do we make a 5000lb truck with a CoG 2′ off the ground perform like a Porsche 911 Turbo? You can do it (for short periods before the tires and brakes are destroyed), but the compromises necessary utterly ruin the thing for what it would actually be useful for.

            Ultimately, if you have $90K to spend on a cool toy have at it, but don’t b!tch about the ride, or the cost of the brakes and tires, etc. For that matter – see Jack’s article on brakes for why this sort of thing is colossally dumb. And then BMW will sell you the even more retarded version, the X6M. Which doesn’t even have any useful space in it to boot.

        • 0 avatar
          jalop1991

          I drove a 280hp Alfa Stelvio today. Wicked nice driver, Alfa all the way–and that 280hp is plenty, with a system that’s tuned well to deliver it, including their d/n/a choices. Dynamic does really well.

          Anyway, you’re absolutely right. As much as I’d love a Quadroformaggio version in theory, that 280hp with dynamic mode is plenty.

          I guess one way to look at it is like Miata. Let me tell you, the Stelvio could make me switch to SUVs, it drives that well. Sure, not the highest horsepower–but a superb overall package that lights up the drive in ways I’m sure the Lexus or Acura can’t touch.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      It’s a good thing that manufacturers offer a variety spicy, sweet, savory, and even sour to satisfy the market’s automotive cravings.

      This truck is not for me. And that’s OK. I fall more in line with krhodes in that I don’t see the need for all the power and the resultant cost. I’d rather have the V6, and spend the 50 grand savings on something low slung and sexy.

      Which brings me to another point. Again, this is my opinion. Mine and mine alone. I don’t understand equating a sports car with other types of vehicles based on their power. For me a sports car is relatively small. And low. And it caresses the road instead of trying to force itself upon it. Doesn’t need to be the most powerful but it does need to be light on its feet.

      Sport sedans are a good compromise. But drive a Cayman back to back with an M3 and the sports car becomes readily apparent.

  • avatar
    ajla

    We need a Ram HD HellCummins with 550hp and 1500lb-ft of torque.

  • avatar
    NoID

    I can’t make a personal value proposition on something that costs more than I’ve ever made in a single year. I’m simply not in the market. That said, this is the first (and only) vehicle I’ve driven that has ever made me giggle. It’s the perfect kind of ridiculous, and if I ever tripped over $90k walking out my front door one day, I might very well pick it up and drop it off at my local Jeep dealer.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    I suspect these will sell very well. My neighbor DD’s an X5 M with a Dinan tune and exhaust. He claims puts it at 640 HP, which i have no reason to doubt.

  • avatar
    pmirp1

    I don’t just like this Jeep, I lust after it. Simply the best overall vehicle in the world today. Bravo Jeep.

    side note, truth be told, I be happy with the regular SRT too.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      This is the unfiltered truth. The entire Grand Cherokee lineup is phenomenal.

      • 0 avatar
        dmoan

        I do like GC find them to have little better reliability but ultimately it is FCA product so buying them is like a game of Russian roulette.

        • 0 avatar
          EBFlex

          Right. Makes total sense. They have one of the best powertrains made today (HEMI + 8-Speed), the best in vehicle entertainment (uConnect) etc.

          Hell I’m on the original set of wipers on my Grand Cherokee with 44K miles. I guess that’s your idea of low quality.

          • 0 avatar
            dmoan

            Well I don’t think you judge a car quality because you didn’t change your wiper that said FCA cuts corners when it comes to quality. Yes GC is better than other FCA products but that doesn’t mean it’s immune to its cost cutting. There are few GC that have held up well and you are lucky that yours has as well but Jeep GC forums are filled with horror stories.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            EVERY car forum is filled with horror stories. Nobody goes on a forum to post that absolutely nothing broke on their car today.

            Statistically, Jeep Grand Cherokees are not as reliable as a Corolla. That does not mean they are “unreliable”.

          • 0 avatar
            Cole Trickle

            Kinda like measuring your gas mileage by how many days you have between gas station trips.

  • avatar
    IHateCars

    I’m sure that this will start at $100K or thereabouts up here in Canuckistan…..bummer!

  • avatar
    MLS

    Having recently rented an underwhelming X5 for a week, I’m not ready to agree that it has a “much nicer interior” than comparably-priced Grand Cherokees.

  • avatar
    mrdcjohn

    Go 60 mph daddy. Fast as you can ! 0 – 60 faster than you can say go fast daddy!

  • avatar
    mrdcjohn

    Ahh were out of milk, be right back

  • avatar
    mrdcjohn

    Darn forgot the bread. Be right back

  • avatar
    mrdcjohn

    Im back, You say we’re out of butter ?

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    I would bet better than even money that the Jeep rides and drives better than the BMW in this case.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      They would have to try really hard to make it ride worse than the BMW. I’d put my money on the BMW going around a racetrack better, but what is the point of taking an SUV on a racetrack?? This will certainly go down a dragstrip faster, but again, why???


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