By on July 2, 2017

Toyota Camry Assembly Factory Georgetown

Toyota is claiming that its TNGA modular platform represents more than a sea change for the Camry. It points to an entirely new direction for the company as a whole, highlighting its commitment to American manufacturing and a future involving more exciting vehicles.

While the latter remains to be seen, the Toyota New Global Architecture has warped the company’s midsize sedan into something almost unrecognizable. With substantially “more-aggressive” styling, the Camry is also boasting efficiency and performance gains — thanks to the platform’s low center of gravity and increased rigidity. But Toyota doesn’t want to keep the technology limited to America’s best-selling sedan, the architecture and concept are set to be baked into future vehicles as well. Because what good is cost-saving modular platform if you are only use it on a single model? 

“TNGA is really about an overhaul mindset for the company,” explained Tom Burrows, Toyota project manager for vehicle quality and production engineering, to Automotive News. “It’s an opportunity for the designers, stylists and our production engineering and manufacturing to think about — and create — what is the best vehicle possible, the best plant possible.”

Toyota Camry Assembly Factory Georgetown

The plant is the TMMK assembly plant in Georgetown, KY. Toyota is spending $1.3 billion in upgrades at the plant to ensure production of the Camry remains ready for assembly using the TNGA platform, while also prepping the facility for future models. According to Toyota, TMMK hired more than 700 additional people to support the launch of the new Camry, bringing its total number of employees to over 8,000. As the largest Toyota plant in the world, TMMK has produced more than 11 million vehicles in its 31 years, over 8 million of which were Camry sedans.

“The launch of the next-generation Camry is important for Toyota in America, and expands the company’s footprint in, and commitment to, Kentucky,” said Wil James, president of TMMK, during last week’s production launch of the new model. “We are proud to be the first in North America to produce a vehicle with TNGA. It’s a testament to the skill and dedication of our team members.”

Toyota New Global Architecture facilities are appearing worldwide to give the Japanese automaker some much-needed flexibility within the marketplace. While Mexico will be using the modular platform to produce the updated Corolla, its assembly lines will be better poised to pick up the slack on other vehicles without undergoing extensive conversions. Likewise, the Kentucky plant will be able to use TNGA to build the Camry and other body styles conducive to American tastes — crossovers, like the RAV4, for example.

A shrewd move if U.S. car sales continue to give way to CUVs.

The contemporary architecture makes the radiator part of the engine module, meaning it doesn’t have to be installed separately. TNGA vehicles can also take four and the six-cylinder motors for the gasoline-powered cars, as well as hybrid engines without forcing assembly lines to reconfigure themselves quite so heavily as before. It’s dollars and cents but it adds up for a manufacturer.

The only exception would be body-on-frame trucks and SUVs, which obviously wouldn’t use the same framework.

Once Toyota’s Avalon switches to the platform in 2018, the Georgetown plant can eliminate one of its three trim assembly lines due to the streamlining of tasks and the use of modular assemblies, said Dan Antis, vice president of manufacturing at TMMK. “As a result of TNGA and the commonization of the underbody, it makes it easier for us to bring in any vehicle, whether its an SUV or another car,” Antis explained.

Toyota Camry Assembly Factory Georgetown

[Images: Toyota]

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77 Comments on “Toyota Claims New Camry Represents an Evolution for the Entire Company...”


  • avatar
    carguy

    How much of this article is from the press release?

  • avatar
    zip89123

    Poorly packaged. One can buy/order a fully loaded $35K XLE hybrid or 4-cyl, but wait, Toyota won’t put factory NAV on it because Toyota expects you to use your smartphone, and then pay Toyota for the privilege after 3 years to use that smartphone. So smartphone smart, Toyota dumb. More buyers for the Fusion, Altima, Accord, etc., due to Toyota’s idiotic packaging.

    • 0 avatar
      quaquaqua

      I think you greatly overstate the popularity of on-board nav. Plus there was a survey done of dealers and less than 10% of people with NAV systems keep them up to date, rendering them pretty useless after a few years.

      • 0 avatar
        zip89123

        That used to be my opinion, until I bought a vehicle equipped with NAV. Now I’ll never do without it. Having moved twice in the past year, NAV was invaluable in new territory. Smartphones are great if you have a 4G or LTE signal, power, more data than you can use, or even own one, but if one of those 4 are missing, you’re SOL or paying for data. There are too many places I travel that only serve a carrier or two, and unless you have ATT &/or Verizon in those areas, the smartphone is either good for calls only or a brick. Last thing I want to do is download a Toyota app and pay Toyota to continue to use the app. My vehicles NAV goes where I go whether I have a smartphone or not.

        I know many don’t care, but Toyota is going to see their high dollar shoppers jump to other brands as a result of no factory NAV on non-V6 models. I jumped ship from Toyota in 2015 due to poor packaging of their products & failure to listen to the consumer, and the 2018 Camry isn’t going to get me back.

        • 0 avatar

          Toyota is basically unstoppable for the next century. GM had their century on top now it is Toyota’s turn. GM now has to worry about falling in fourth place behind Nissan. Nissan is only 150,000 vehicles behind GM in international sales this year. When we are talking about millions of vehicles sold being behind 150,000 really is not that much. Remember, Nissan is gaining market share every year, while GM is losing it faster than any other car maker in the world. The reason GM’s stock is stuck at 35 is because investors know it is still losing market share. Barra mad dash for profits won’t save GM.

          • 0 avatar

            I HAS ALREADY HAPPENED!! Nissan has surpassed GM in sales so far in 2017. Read below it is not a lie!
            https://www.forbes.com/sites/bertelschmitt/2017/06/29/worlds-largest-automakers-toyota-renault-nissan-volkswagen-neck-and-neck/#5e2484b172fe

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Akear
            I thought you were behind the times in your first post. Now GM has to worry about Hyundai/ Kia

          • 0 avatar
            brn

            It’s a sad day when garbage like Nissan and VW beat out GM.

            But volume doesn’t equate to quality. McDonalds sells more burgers than Mannys. That doesn’t make them better.

          • 0 avatar
            joeaverage

            Is the GM sales number with or without Opel?

        • 0 avatar
          Jack Denver

          Google Maps allows you to download maps to your phone over wifi so you don’t need to use data when you are in motion (unless you want traffic updates). Google maps is free, is updated constantly and integrates nicely with Android Auto / Apple Carplay compatible vehicles. On board nav costs thousands new and map updates are usually costly. The quality varies, but whatever it is, it is usually well behind the state of the art after a few years (even if you update the maps, the software usually stay the same) while Google Maps defines the state of the art.

          I have a car with a nav system but I prefer Google Maps. The only beef that I have with it is that, even if the phone is plugged into a charger, on a very long trip it will run the battery down faster than it can charge.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            You just need to upgrade your charger, assuming your phone can charge at the higher rate. I used to have that problem but then I picked up an adapter that will put out 2a. Now I can run Google Maps, and have a GPS speedo app or a OBDII program running at the same time and it will still be putting a slow charge on the battery.

            Personally I usually just use it for the final part of the trip. I’ll punch in the destination, check the route and if there is any usual traffic, then shut it down until I’m closer to the destination. Now if I’m driving during rush hour I’ll have it going all the time and monitor traffic and listed for it to tell me it has found an alternate route that will save time. IE bail on the freeway before I get stuck trying to make it past the accident that just happened 2 minutes ago.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @brn
            When Garbage like what GM is producing is now seen for what it is.

          • 0 avatar
            brn

            Robert, because VW and Nissan are producing quality??

        • 0 avatar
          dror

          You don’t need data to have NAV using your phone, I traveled in the most remote places in Iceland using my iphone on airplane mode (no data), you can use “here” (the app that was bought by the German automakers from Nokia) or off line google maps, “here” will let you download for free any region in the world.
          In my car in the US, I use apple car play (2016 Accord), once you start navigating, it will not stop even if you loose data for some time, same as with google maps.
          it’s a little strange what is behind Toyota’s decision to eliminate Apple Car Play and Android Auto.

          • 0 avatar
            VelocityRed3

            Scoutdude, what is the name of the OBDII program? Does it require a dongle be in the OBDII port?

            As to the NAV thing, the solution is Apple/Android that allows WAZE to work on the 8 to 11″ screen on the vehicle.

          • 0 avatar
            joeaverage

            You can also buy standalone navigation apps that never need data. I have Navigon on my elderly Samsung Centura that works a treat.

        • 0 avatar
          HahnZahn

          I’m gonna guess Toyota’s done their market research. If even my 63-year-old mother shopping for a new car intrinsically understands that NAV as an installed option is a huge waste of money, bet a lot of others do, too. Putting in Apple Car Play would have been a better play.

        • 0 avatar
          MrIcky

          @zip, you do realize you can download the nav map to your smartphone so data usage is not necessary right? Data is only necessary if you want on the fly updates on traffic situations.

          I have nav and still use my cell phone anyway. Faster, easier, can set it when I’m not in the car, etc. And I know that’s not ‘just me’

          • 0 avatar
            cdotson

            Not to mention you can lie to your phone and tell it you’re a passenger and it lets you operate Nav while the car is in motion. None of the nannying BS from your car that knows it’s in drive and ignores the fact a passenger may in fact be a “navigator.”

    • 0 avatar
      jalop1991

      You’re talking about Entune?

      I don’t have to pay for Entune just to use my phone–for ANYTHING.

      I would honestly prefer that they stop with Entune, save the money, pass the savings to me, and give me an easy way to mount my phone somewhere reasonable so I can turn on the maps and use them.

      (Actually, I would probably put my Garmin on the dash–with all of my favorites and history over the last 15 years–and leave the phone for talking duties. Navigation is something that deserves to be a unitasker. Every few years I upgrade to a newer Garmin, refurb for $100, now with lifetime maps and traffic data. Car companies should just plain get out of the nav business already.)

      • 0 avatar
        zip89123

        I’m talking about factory NAV, whether the Entune name is included or not. Garmin is a great product, and I wish manufacturers would buy the license for use in their vehicles. I want the embedded product, not the add-on. If it’s good enough to be an option for the XLE/XSE V6, it’s good enough for the XLE 4-cyl & XLE hybrid.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          Maybe it’s a generational thing, but I’d MUCH rather deal with phone sourced navigation setup (whether its running through a dash display or in a seperate holder) than anything factory sourced and built into the dash that you have to pay to maintain. A) the factory systems are never as good as Google Maps/Waze in my experience, and B) paying for anything to keep it updated strikes me as quite quaint. If you’ll be out of data coverage, just download the offline area to your phone. I did that down in Costa Rica and it worked perfectly.

          • 0 avatar
            jalop1991

            I don’t know that it’s a generational thing. I’m an old fart, and I agree with you.

            I want a car to be A CAR. Period. I don’t want it to be a rolling iPhone, trying to do all that crap.

      • 0 avatar
        Carrera

        Yes. I have Entune on my Corolla S. It is free. I have NAVI as well but never use it. I use Here We Go app ( no data needed) or Google maps. I love the Weather radar feature. That thing rocks.

        • 0 avatar
          zip89123

          You folks know more about all this app downloading than I do, in fact you know more about it than anyone I know. Folks I know just google driving directions for where they’re going. I’ve done that too as one of my vehicles doesn’t have NAV, but I like my in-car NAV better. Usually where I’m going is 600 miles away, one way, and I get live updates, meanwhile I can use my phone via Bluetooth if needed without trying to figure out how to do both. Maps are great downloaded, but can I navigate with them versus just reading a map?

          Still, my opinion is Toyota is screwing up not making NAV an option on otherwise loaded non-V6 vehicles. I’d pay for NAV as an option before I’d pay for other options they’re offering. It’s bad enough paying $5500 for a V6 upgrade, highway robbery IMO.

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            Toyota, while being the one benefiting from the retention of a V6 option, at least at this point (with Honda ceding the market by following the bean-counting, enviro-nazi crowd to turbo fours all-around in the Accord, unlike what was predicted, which was NA four and turbo four in the Camry, turbo four and V6 in the Accord) might not be in the catbird seat like we think; we’ll see in a couple weeks what the power ratings are when Honda raises the curtain in Detroit on the new Accord, followed by ride & drives in August. Right now, it’s even money, IMHO, whether Honda hits this out of the park despite the seeming engine shortcomings, or if they’ve lost the plot for good. (And whether they lose me as a 24+-year customer.) If the latter, despite what I’ll state next, Toyota will wipe the floor with the Accord! (One of the salesmen at my Honda dealer got a tongue-lashing from a customer who had leased a string of Accord V6s from him on the day Honda broke the news about the demise of that engine; yelled loud enough that he was done as a customer that the young couple sitting in his cubicle waiting to take delivery of a new Fit could hear him plain as day! Unlike that turkey, I’m going to at least test drive the new Accord 2.0T before I swear them off for good; the 2013 in my avatar is one payment away from being mine, and I’ll like not having a payment for a year or (probably) two!)

            The reason I say that is that one thing against Toyota is that, despite a multi-thousand dollar premium for the V6 (as opposed to a ~$2,100 upcharge to the V6 in the 2017 Accord EX-L Sedan) is the fact that some features which are common on at least the high-end trims across the class, such as memory seats and auto-delay wipers, aren’t even available on any Camry! (You have to move up to the Avalon for that stuff!) Is this also true on the Altima, which has the Maxima as the step-up?

        • 0 avatar
          joeaverage

          How about a car system that simply mirrors the smart phone screen on a quality in dash screen of a reasonable size and resolution?

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus

    Platform sharing is great!*

    *when toyota does it. Anyone else, well, its just the reason they suck.

    • 0 avatar
      quaquaqua

      Who the hell is complaining about platform sharing in this day and age? I mean, we all know where your Stockholm Syndrome loyalties lie, like, sure, people used to call out Ford/Lincoln for it, and that seems to have upset you vewwy vewwy much, but then they actually got decent platforms to share (well, one, thanks Fusion!) and then no one complains when it turns into an Edge or even an MKX, because it’s actually good. Funny how that works!

      • 0 avatar
        jalop1991

        There’s platform sharing, and then there’s just plain dumping new leather and a different dashboard into the EXACT same lower end car and declaring it to be a premium vehicle.

        Yes, Lincoln, I’m looking at you.

        • 0 avatar
          Jack Denver

          Exactly – platform sharing is NOT the same thing as badge engineering. Cars (especially FWD) that share the same platform can be so different from each other so as to make the fact that they share a common platform completely invisible to the consumer.

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          As a recent 1.5 gen MKX buyer I have to disagree. My wife, a complete automotive civilian, saw more of a difference between the Edge Titanium and MKX we drove back to back. Might not be as nice as an RX but it costs less too. And it’s tangibly nicer than even a fully loaded edge.

        • 0 avatar

          “Yes, Lincoln, I’m looking at you.”

          So doing the exactly same thing with Camry and calling it Lexus is okay in your opinion? Not saying that making little FWD Lincolns is a right thing to make Lincolns (they could keep Mercury for that). But Honda and Toyota are doing the exactly same thing. But Toyota still tries to make real luxury cars even though they cannot sell them. Ford apparently does not have guts to make real Lincolns. They tried to shortcut by buying JRL and AM, but you cannot buy greatness for money – you have to work hard and deserve it.

          • 0 avatar
            jalop1991

            Back in the day, the ES was NOT the Camry. It was platform sharing.

            Today, I don’t know how much of the ES is really just an Avalon with different leather and dashboard.

            I do know that Acura badge engineered the ILX out of the Civic.

            Toyota can sell everything they make with the Lexus badge on it. Not sure what you’re talking about.

            I would absolutely take a very close look at a real Lincoln. But I’m sure that ship has sailed.

    • 0 avatar

      Why isn’t GM slipping to fourth place behind Nissan not the top story here. It should be the automotive story of the year.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        Because Nissan is doing it by cranking out decontented junk and writing subprime loans to anyone with a pulse.

        Short term gain, long term pain. Just like GM of old.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          GM isn’t?

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            No, they aren’t Look at rebates on Malibu compared to the competition for starters…

            Malibu – $1500 on the hood or $209 lease $2500 up front

            Camry – $3000 on the hood or $179 lease with $2250 up front

            Altima – up to $4550 on the hood or $189 lease with $3200 up front

            Fusion – $2100 to $5650 on the hood or $236 lease with $3300 up front

            Accord – $0 on the hood or $189 lease with $2000 up front

            Mazda6 – $2500 on the hood or $199 lease with $2000 up front

            Sonata – $6000 on the hood or $199 lease with $2400 up front

            Optima – $2500 on the hood plus no payments for 5 months – no incentive lease deal offered

            320i X-Drive – $2500 on the hood* and $309 lease with $3900 up front

            Passat – $0 on the hood and $199 lease with $2000 up front

            =======================================

            So only Honda and VW has lower incentives for midsizers (I left the defunct Chrysler 200 out) than the ‘bu. The Camry is the largest fleet seller in terms of total numbers, the Fusion is the largest fleet seller in terms of percentage. GM has been growing retail share.

      • 0 avatar

        GM tries to cut unprofitable sales and Nissan does not care – they had much better reputation 10 years ago, I remember there even used to be Maxima fans. Now Nissans are considered as a pile of junk by many and no one cares about Maxima anymore.

  • avatar

    Folks, Toyota is the world’s number one car maker for the next century. Cut-and-run Barra pretty much assured that when she pulled GM from Europe, which is the world’s most competitive market. By 2020 Toyota will be the top car maker in America as well.

    Boeing and Toyota have to be the two best run companies on the planet.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Denver

      A century is an awfully long time in business. A lot can happen in a century. If the industry shifts to electric propulsion, then all bets are off for the current players. Maybe Tesla or some company that doesn’t even exist yet will be #1. Maybe it will a Chinese company. 100 years ago, Toyota was making fabric looms, not cars. No one has a crystal ball that is good for 100 years.

      That being said, Toyota is certainly well positioned for the next decade or two.

  • avatar
    EX35

    I’m a bit confused. can someone summarize what makes this “new” Camry so great?

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      More powerful V6 and no CVT.

    • 0 avatar
      tonycd

      Faster and better MPG, both without turbos, better handling, various improvements throughout. It’s the first truly new Camry, and the first unqualifiedly improved one, in 25 years.

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        As I said above, that’s their ace in the hole. It’s now Honda that needs to have a full house. As I learned from the one salesperson at my Honda dealer after he was berated by a longtime Accord V6 lessee over their decision to go 2.0T on the top, the V6 buyers are few but loyal, and pi$$ them off at your peril!

        As I also stated, the lack of some expected features found on other higher trims in the class, like memory seats, could reduce their conquest rate from Accord V6 loyalists, and perhaps Mazda 6 owners who want more power in a midsize sedan. (Many of the usual rags have stated that all of the handling and drivability gains seem to have been made in the Camry four, as, like the Accord V6, the new Camry V6 is less lithe in the corners than the four (as Jack hasn’t stated is the case in his Coupe, which also appears to be dying after this year), and is more of a straight-line standout, in the muscle-car idiom.)

  • avatar
    Joss

    Wake me up when Kentucky and Toyota are churning out hundreds of thousands of Eevee’s. I know I’m jumping Leaps and Bounds ahead but my visionary is made up and we’re on the cusp of a future world of electric vehicles.

    First we heated and illuminated our homes with wood and oil then we went to electricity. The infrastructure was built quickly and for Profit. For some reason the 20th century was some great evil empire of oil. That’s how it will be seen.

    • 0 avatar
      anomaly149

      The Prius is the first vehicle on the TNGA. Hybrid integration is assumed for the rest of the TNGA family.

      They’re already churning out an awful lot of HEVs.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        …and Toyota just got a patent for solid state lithium battery technology, so they seem to be on the move in the BEV space. Watch out:

        http://insideevs.com/toyota-solid-state-battery-patent/

    • 0 avatar
      joeaverage

      But why all this interest in EVs when gasoline is $1.88 a gallon?

      Are there predictions of $4.25 gasoline coming again?

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        @joeaverage: But why all this interest in EVs

        Because they’re awesome to drive. That’s the main reason I own one and love to drive it. Smooth, quiet, and that instant response. I think the driving experience is what’s really driving EV sales.

        Check out some of these videos of average people and their reaction to riding in a Tesla.

        youtube.com/results?search_query=tesla+mode+reactions

  • avatar
    johnnyz

    Idk my 2016 Maxima has a cvt and it is better than a slush box. It has a more connected feel and it will turn. 14.3 quarter mile.

    Nobody has made a better V6 than Nissan. Sorry toyo.

    • 0 avatar
      HahnZahn

      Haven’t driven a Nissan with a CVT, but my Subaru has one. Might be the best transmission I’ve ever had. It’s definitely better than the dual-clutch automatic on my previous TDI. At low speeds, it often felt like it was gonna just snap in half.

      • 0 avatar
        johnnyz

        My daughter’s 09 Altima cvt, not so much. The 16 Maxima gives. Real connected feel. It screams when you punch it at 50mph, like a manual in 3rd gear.

        You have to realize that the 16 Maxima has the latest Special Sauce CVT. It uses a programmed 7-speed fake map and it is rated to handle a 300hp motor.

        As time goes on the difference between CVT, conventional automatic, dualnclutch will disappear and it will be simply known as an automatic.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          This I agree with. A girlfriend a decade ago had an ’05 Altima with the CVT and it felt awful, and had solenoids fail at 80K miles. Nissan paid for 1/2, and then about a year later there was a recall.

          I had a Maxima earlier this year as a rental and I left my experience driving it not understanding all the hate. I thought it was a damn nice car. The price on a gently used 1 or 2 year old model makes them a screaming deal off-lease

          • 0 avatar
            scott25

            Every vehicle I’ve driven with a CVT has felt like complete and utter garbage. 15 CRV, C-HR and current gen Altima were the last 3. I’ve never driven a Maxima though.

    • 0 avatar
      tonycd

      “Nobody has made a better V6 than Nissan. Sorry toyo.”

      Disagree. The VQ is a rough, noisy relic that needs a BS rubber-band transmission to deliver decent gas mileage. Toyota’s V6 and Honda’s venerable J-Series both hand it its head, for my money.

      • 0 avatar
        caljn

        Nope. The 2016 VQ not rough and noisy. Smooth, powerful, quiet and pulls nicely with the re-worked cvt.

        Things change sir, like the new Camry evidently.

      • 0 avatar
        johnnyz

        Growing up in the 1980s and being a cheap ass, I always wanted my cake and eat it too. I never wanted to pay for gas in a V8 vehicle. So, that left me with a few V6 choices.

        Gm 2.8-3.1… unreliable and talk about rough power delivery. 3.8 is like a truck motor torque but no spin and definitely not a performance motor.. I do not think that Ford has made a good v6 until recently, maybe the yamaha sho, the 2.7 eco boost is pretty good. That left Nissan.Nissan makes the best NA V6. I do not find them to be rough. In fact, car and driver has compared the Nissan in a V6 to a Ferrari motor.

        Of course, na Motors are going by the wayside and will soon be extinct. Replaced by Turbo fours and hybrid systems.

        I will hang on to my Maxima for a few more years and then maybe get a nice Audi. For the life of me I do not understand all the hate directed at Nissan. I have put hundreds of thousands of miles on their vehicles with very little trouble. GM vehicles that I have owned have been a very different story!

        • 0 avatar
          Shawnski

          You need a little history lesson. Ford has been making mass market 60 degree V6’s longer than anyone. German and British built since the Sixties. The first 60 degree domestic V6 was in ’85 for the newly developed Taurus; 3.0 Vulcan. This all cast iron 150 hp prime mover was nothing to write home about but it was smooth and dead reliable, ceased production in 2011. The 2.5/3.0 DOHC V6 was introduced in ’94, and I believe no longer produced; used both in Europe and the US, I don’t have first hand experience, but I don’t know of any major issues with this engine family??

          Sonds like you know what is used now of the 2 current engine families 3.5/3.7/3.5EB and 2.7EB/3.0EB.

          Ford is usually ahead of the curve when it comes to 60 degree V6 development.

          • 0 avatar

            I have experience with both Ford V6 engines. I had ’94 Taurus with Vulcan and ’02 Mercury Sable with Duratec 3.0L. Both engines were super reliable, but Vulcan was pretty antiquated even in 1992. I would prefer any Japanese 2.0L I4 instead. Duratec was a good engine though not as refined as Toyota or Honda engines but pretty competitive. It run up to 175K with no issues when I traded Merc in for Fusion Titanium with 2.0 Ecoboost which is more capable engine except of inevitable turbo lag. Next car I am planning to buy most likely will be electric. Gasoline engines becoming too complicated and difficult to service.

  • avatar

    Radiator as part of the engine assembly? Does this mean owners will have to buy a $7000 engine just to replace a $150 rad?

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      no, it just means it comes *into the assembly plant* as a module. not that it can’t be replaced by itself after the fact.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        Ahhh, but are they thinking ahead on replacement where it comes in one module, or will it be a nightmare to replace because “what were they thinking when the installed this???”

  • avatar
    deanst

    This story reminds me of vw’s move to modular architecture, and claims of some undefined 25% reduction in costs. Didn’t seem to get them anywhere, but I would be inclined to believe their is more validity in toyota’s claims. Don’t know why more plants can’t move from sedans to cuvs easier. Despite all the miracle wizardry around modern manufacturing, there sometimes seems to be less progress than you’d expect.

    • 0 avatar
      cammark

      Technology moves forward more quickly than the mindset of those in charge of the spending and decision making. There is also a lot of 20 year old equipment out there that still has value on the books so the numbers guys want it to keep running until it won’t.

      Same thing happens with lots of ideas that make their way into futurism/sci-fi books and movies. The tech is here for flying cars and so on but until it makes business sense it won’t get done. Until all the guys who remember how it used to be done are retired and gone, change won’t keep up

    • 0 avatar
      anomaly149

      The answer is a bit more practical: you can flex your adjustable assembly equipment, but you can’t flex an instrument panel injection mold, or a hood stamping die.

    • 0 avatar
      Richard Chen

      I haven’t seen a better description of TNGA than Bertel Schmitt’s article from 2015:

      http://dailykanban.com/2015/03/toyotas-tnga-tps-2-0/

  • avatar
    SuperCarEnthusiast

    I am missing on why Toyota with it ugly front grills keeps on going in sales. It is totally mystery to me. Who is buying and/or leasing these cars that look like a psychopath design the front end! I talked to a couple of Lexus owners and they say that they hate the look of the front end but they stay loyal to the brand because of it reliability.

    • 0 avatar
      carguy67

      Front-end design by Calvin:

      http://tinyurl.com/y72sqhvg

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      “I am missing on why Toyota with it ugly front grills keeps on going in sales. It is totally mystery to me….I talked to a couple of Lexus owners and they say that they hate the look of the front end but they stay loyal to the brand because of it reliability.”

      Come on now, you just answered your own question. Polarizing front fascias aren’t going to be enough to offset the brand’s reputation for reliability and ownership costs. If the styling chases some buyers away, it may also bring some buyers in.

  • avatar
    threeer

    Does anybody else find it *slightly* ironic that Toyota’s biggest plant is in KY (and to add to the point, BMW’s biggest facility is in SC?)? Seems more foreign companies are interested in hiring Americans than are American companies.

    Anywho. I’ll reserve judgement on the new Camry until I’ve seen one up close. Somehow, that front end is just off-putting to me (in pictures, at least). But A for effort to finally spice up the Camry a bit, even if the massive number of people who bought one before didn’t really care. It’ll get an uptick in sales for a while, but I’m not sure much out there can stop the CUV/SUV juggernaut.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      “But A for effort to finally spice up the Camry a bit”

      The Camry has been spiced up a bit for 10 years now. The 2007 SE V6 was very quick and handled sharply by segment standards, and that’s continued through the SE and XSE trims of the outgoing generation.

      With so many beige and sky-blue XLEs floating down the road, though, the stigma has been hard to shake.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Is there word when the Lexus ES will be switching to this platform?

    It would be a bit scandalous if there is a new Avalon before there is a new ES. (Given that the ES is likely the bigger cash cow for Toyota.)

    • 0 avatar
      jalop1991

      The Avalon comes in 2019, a year after the Camry.

      Given that since 2013 the ES has been built on the Avalon platform, I’ll let you do the math.

  • avatar
    DownUnder2014

    I am interested to see where the next Camry will be built (for the Australian market), seeing as the Altona plant will close October 3rd, 2017.

    As an aside, are they using a revised version of the existing 3.5 2GR-FE V6 in the new Camry? Or is there a all-new V6 being fitted in?


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