By on May 19, 2017

ford logo

Welcome to the first entry in a new series, Domestics Abroad. We’ll be taking a look at the international models proffered around the world that wear a domestic company’s badge on the grille but are not offered in their brands’ domestic markets. This is ground zero for “you can’t get that here.” All nameplates you’ll see in this series are current production models.

We kick off the series with Ford, which has the largest number of other-market vehicles than any other domestic manufacturer despite its “One Ford” mantra.

Proceeding in alphabetical order:

Image: Ford B-Max Titanium

B-Max 

The European market receives the B-Max, which is a tiny minivan on the Fiesta platform. It has been on sale since 2012. Not bad!

Image: Ford Cargo

Cargo 

Moving on to South America, you can find the Ford Cargo — a cab-over semi truck. Keen truck observers may already know Ford sold the Cargo in North America from 1986-1993, but the company discontinued it here due to poor sales.

Image: Ford EcoSport, via Wikipedia

EcoSport 

Here’s a piece of short-term forbidden fruit. Ford will introduce the subcompact EcoSport in the United States in 2018, but the company has sold it in Brazil since 2003. The current generation you see here has been around since 2012.

Image: Ford Escort, via Wikipedia

Escort

A familiar-but-deceased nameplate to Americans, much like Tempo and Tracer, the Escort has been on sale in China since 2015. The Escort is classed as a compact executive car in that market (whatever that means) and positioned below the Focus. That’s interesting when you consider the Focus was a direct replacement for the deceased Escort.

Image: Ford Everest, via Wikipedia

Everest

Subject of some discussion on TTAC in past times, the Everest is a rear-wheel-drive SUV marketed by Ford in most other markets — but not North America. First based on the Mazda B-series pickup truck, it’s now based on the Ranger that we’ll soon see here. The Everest is surprisingly expensive, ranging from just over $39,000 USD in Australia for a base model, up to a heady $63,000 USD. Everest, indeed.

Image: Ford Focus ST Wagon, via Wikipedia

Focus Wagon 

Europeans (and New Zealand) have a Focus Wagon to turn to when the regular Focus just isn’t large enough. North Americans had this option through just 2007. It’s not difficult to find a few enthusiasts pining for this particular Focus solution. Note the example above is actually an ST variant.

Image: Ford Galaxy, via Ford Europe

Galaxy

Most of you will recall the not-so-good Ford Freestar and Mercury Monterey vans as the last minivans on offer from the Blue Oval on our shores (salty shores, where rust happens!). Other countries presently have the Galaxy van. Ford developed the first-generation Galaxy in conjunction with Volkswagen and SEAT as the Sharan and Alhambra, respectively. Two generations have debuted since then. The Galaxy is a big brother to the S-Max (below) and almost American-sized, but its lack of sliding doors might limit North American success were it to arrive here.

Image: Ford Ka, via Wikipedia

Ka/Figo

The Ford Ka is a perennial European subcompact favorite, on sale since the mid 1990s. The first one was odd looking (there was even a convertible, the StreetKa), but the current model forgoes those wacky styling tendencies and adopts a Fiesta look. India and Mexico get this model as the Figo.

Image: Ford Mondeo Wagon, via Wikipedia

Mondeo 

Now we all know Ford sells the Mondeo here as the Fusion, and before that it sold the same car as the Contour and Mystique. But for modern reasons (CUV-shaped ones), there are two Mondeo formats we do not get here: the wagon and the liftback. The wagon is shown above, teasing you mercilessly in pewter metallic. Your local Ford dealer asks you to come in and check out the Edge.

Image: Ford Ranger, via Wikipedia

Ranger

The North American Ranger was not the same as the international ranger, seen above in modern quad cab guise. Many people (and stores like NAPA Auto Parts) lamented when the Ranger left our shores after the 2011 model year. The truck you see here will be the basis for the return of the Ranger to North America in 2019, soon followed by a new Bronco in 2020.

Image: Ford S-Max, via Wikipedia

S-Max

As I mentioned above, the S-Max is the smaller sister of the Galaxy model — a smaller van. In typical European option fashion, gasoline or diesel is available, in manual or automatic guise, with front-wheel or all-wheel drive.

Image: Ford Taurus, Chinese Version, via Wikipedia

Taurus 

While our unpopular (D3 platform) Taurus would seem to be tottering toward the end of its life, China already gets a next-generation model based on the CD4 platform. That’s the very same platform you find underneath the Lincoln Continental. Currently, Ford only produces and sells the CD4 Taurus in China — and no matter where it goes from there, North America won’t be getting it.

Image: Ford Tourneo Courier, via Wikipedia

Tourneo Courier 

Bringing up the rear (alphabetically speaking), there’s another little European van we here in North America don’t receive. It’s called the Tourneo Courier, and it shares a platform with the B-Max, Ka, Fiesta, and EcoSport. To borrow a phrase from Jerry Seinfeld, it’s a stylish European Carryall, and smaller than the smallest Transit we get here.

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102 Comments on “Domestics Abroad: The Internationals From Ford...”


  • avatar
    kkop

    So many models – so much blandness! Not missing anything IMO.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      I agree. No Crown Vic next-gen, no Mark X, no 4-passenger Thunderbird convertible, no bench seat Ranchero, no LTD, no Montego MX Brougham!

      • 0 avatar
        dukeisduke

        Montego LX Brougham? Lol. My mom worked with a woman that drove one, a ’68 4-door with 302 (her husband sold cars at an L-M dealer in Dallas at the time). I rode in it only a couple of times, and I thought it was pretty sweet – much nicer than the ’68 Fairlane 4-door that a friend in high school drove.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          Montego? lol.

          Give me an early 70s Marquis (no Grand). Why? Because it showcases what a strange position Mercury was in for so much of its history.

        • 0 avatar
          Lorenzo

          I threw that in because I actually owned a ’68 4-door MX Brougham. I bought it from my mechanic in ’72, with a 4bbl 351 engine. My mechanic’s wife ran up a lot of tickets for speeding and accidental burnouts. It was pretty easy to spin the wheels, even with the automatic.

          It was the one car I wished I’d held onto, but moving from RI to CA, I couldn’t register it with the “illegal” engine, and sold it to a guy who came out to San Diego from Yuma to drive it away.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Pretty much. A bunch of sub 2.0L people movers and an aged cabover truck.

      • 0 avatar
        Eyeflyistheeye

        I like how the South American Cargo became the Dolly Parton of trucks with faces that just don’t match the frame. My favorite is the Cargo in the above picture, obviously Ford trying to adapt “New Edge” styling for the Cargo. Hilarious.

        • 0 avatar
          jhefner

          I think it is more like Ford trying to apply as much streamlining to the flat nose of a COE as they can; along with the corporate face.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @Eyeflyistheeye
          That is another TTAC mistake Not a current Brazilian or Turkish Cargo. Truck has been redesigned since then

          • 0 avatar
            Eyeflyistheeye

            @RobertRyan

            Thank you for yet another answer in search of a question as is deriguer of the Ambiguously Trans-Tasman Duo. I clearly stated that the Cargo pictured was a South American version.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @Eye
          It is an Old Brazilian version, not the current one.VW Trucks a division of MAN
          is the big seller of HDT Trucks in Brazil.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Scoutdude
      As well as being developed and engineerd in Australia the Bronco is being designed by the Ford Australia unit who have done the New US Ranger as well
      Got it right we are doing the whole dedign process

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    You also do not get the smaller Ford Transit Custom. Bigger than the Ford Transit City and a bit smaller than the base Transit.
    Everest is mainly 4WD not 2WD. It is powered by the 3.2 Diesel. As this cannot be upgraded to Euro 6 it is being replaced by the Lion V6
    So much for ” One Ford” LOL

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Nobody ever claimed that “One Ford” meant all models are for sale in all markets.

      But, you can pretend that’s what everyone said so you can make fun of it. That seems to be your standard operating procedure: make up facts and then ramble aimlessly around it.

      One Ford simply means no different models for different markets, like selling a Mazda rebadge midsize car some places, a Euro Ford midsize in other places, and an American Ford midsize in North America. Now we have one midsize car for all markets (with two different names, only because of history in the different markets).

      I know its super hard to understand. Maybe ask your teacher to explain it again.

  • avatar
    gkhize

    I like the looks of the Everest. It looks like it could have been the next generation Explorer if they’d stayed with the truck based platform here. That front end would look pretty good on the new Ranger too. The Galaxy and S-Max look like they could compete nicely with the Odyssey and such, assuming they added sliders.

    • 0 avatar
      Corey Lewis

      Nobody would pay that kind of money for it though.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        But Australian production is notoriously expensive (just ask GM) what would an Everest built in the USA/Canada/Mexico cost?

        I WANT IT!

        Give me 4×4, an optional 3rd row, and what ever engine options Ford sees fit to offer. I’d like mine in the 250-300 hp range.

        • 0 avatar
          Corey Lewis

          A fair point, those Australian labourers want too many aussiebucks.

          • 0 avatar
            AdamOfAus

            Yep. We won’t be making a thing down here soon. The government has basically regulated people out of a job over the years. Unions can share some of that blame too. A Japanese work ethic might of helped us too… : /

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            AdamofAus (?)
            How has the government regulated workers out of a job? Really, with unemployment at 5.6% your comment is amusing.

            What occurred is the government stopped subsidising the auto industry. This has nothing to do with regulations.

        • 0 avatar
          AdamOfAus

          Dan the Everest has some Australian development history but Ranger and Everest are both made in Thailand, making the asking price even worse on these models. Ford Australia is purely an importer now, with the design studio (type thing) remaining.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            Ford has stated their intent to make the Ranger and Bronco in the United States. I’m probably the ONLY person on this site who was hoping for an Everest based Bronco, everyone else seems to want a Wrangler/FJ Cruiser.

            Although the Wrangler Unlimited 4-door is a strong seller. I can’t see Ford introducing a 2-door only Bronco in the current market.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @PrincipalDan
          Absolutely nothing to do with it. It is built in Thailand for starters and the ridiculous cost is Ford Motor Co.pricing
          Others in the segment are much cheaper.
          Ford wonders why it does not sell that well.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            So, the Ranger and Bronco for sale in the US (WHICH IS WHAT HE WAS OBVIOUSLY TALKING ABOUT) will be imported from Thailand. You heard it here first, guys! RobertRyan has it covered.

            What? Ford is retooling the Michigan plant to build them? Nooooooo! That means…more upside down facts from Austrailia.

    • 0 avatar
      jpolicke

      Seems like it would be a viable competitor to Durango and Traverse.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    “One Ford” meant not making completely different cars to serve the same segment in different markets: in the old days, the Taurus, Mondeo, and Falcon were all midsize family cars.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      That’s not what it means. One pillar is “not having redundant architectures.” Like having the North American mid-size car based on a Mazda platform, while the rest of the world uses a completely different CD-size platform.

      it has never been about eliminating market specific top hats. There’s no point in trying to sell *any* of the above vehicles (except the EcoSport) in the US because there’s no market for them. People here aren’t buying Fiestas as it is, what would be the point of wedging the Figo/Ka in beneath it?

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @JimZ
        They will be selling the Australian developed Ranger and Bronco.Ford Cargo is not what is avaialble eksrwhere. Ford SUV’s and Pickups not saleable outside NA

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          what does this have to do with anything I said?

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @JimZ
            You said there was no markets for them in the US. Same applies to US Pickups abd SUV’s, Globally

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Jim, its Australia, and VW, and Australia.

            Oh, and Australia.

            Is it just me, or is there suddenly a disproportionate amount of commenters hailing from Oz? Or one with too much time on his hands?

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Focus and Fusion wagon…so much goodness.

  • avatar

    The Ford Cargo was discontinued as an NA Ford when the heavy-duty line of trucks was sold off to what became Sterling, not because it didn’t sell well here.

    In fact, Sterling produced this same truck for a few years before they themselves went out of business.

    • 0 avatar
      CoastieLenn

      Sterling is alive and well. Not sure that they ever went totally out of business.
      https://sterlingtrucks.com/

      EDIT- I stand corrected. I hadn’t read the note on the main page. Discontinued production March 2009.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        they didn’t really “go out of business,” Daimler just folded operations into Freightliner.

        • 0 avatar
          CoastieLenn

          Isn’t Daimler lumped in with Freightliner somehow or am I making that assumption based solely off the Sprinter?

          • 0 avatar
            Corey Lewis

            The semi dealer up at the north part of 275 here still has the Sterling sign up with the other brands.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Now that sounds like an investigative story for Corey.

            I want to know *why*.

          • 0 avatar
            CoastieLenn

            Corey-

            The website I linked says that they still have servicing and parts centers. They also show the Western Star and Freightliner logos so I’d imagine that they’re all in bed together at those locations.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            Daimler bought Freightliner, Western Star, American LaFrance, Thomas, and Detroit Diesel back when Jürgen Schrempp was building his empire (eventually becoming DaimlerChrysler.) When Ford got out of the heavy truck business, they sold it to Daimler who initially branded it as Sterling, later winding the brand down and folding resources into Freightliner.

            fun fact- for a short time, DCX sold the “Sterling Bullet” which was a rebadged Ram HD.

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sterling_Bullet

          • 0 avatar
            Corey Lewis

            Ah ha, thanks.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @CoastieLenn
            Freightliner and Western Star Trucks are owned by Mercedes Benz ( Daimler)

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            WOW RYAN THAT IS A RIVOTING PIECE OF INFORMATION!

            You forgot to tie it in with American trucks selling really awful. Plus VW is great, Adolf is good… Ahhh-mem. Australia.

        • 0 avatar

          Well, none of the vehicles that Sterling produced that were former Ford products are manufactured anymore, and Sterling is no longer producing new vehicles, so I’d say they pretty much don’t exist. A sad end to nearly a century of heavy-duty Ford trucks.

    • 0 avatar
      cdotson

      Cabover trucks were discontinued wholesale in North America because they didn’t sell well. The ICC was killed off and truck length laws were relaxed and NHTSA/DOT prioritized driver stress reduction/comfort over overall truck length, hence COE trucks are gone and long wheelbase conventionals rule the road.

      • 0 avatar
        jhefner

        Aerodynamics also played a role; starting with the Kenworth “Aardvark” T600, long nose trucks have better aerodynamics than COE trucks.

        COE trucks are still popular in Europe because their tight wheelbase helps in navigating narrow streets.

        • 0 avatar
          Ermel

          Also, length limits. A semi can only be 16,5 metres long in the EU, and may have 13,4 metres of cargo space length. Subtract another metre for semitrailer front wall, doors, and the space between cab and semitrailer, and you end up with a cabover if you need a bed (which you do even for our laughingly so-called “long distance” traffic). You could still use bonneted trucks with shorter semitrailers, such as tippers or tankers, and some still do; but it certainly wouldn’t pay to make any new ones for this relatively small niche, and so the truck makers don’t anymore. For truck-and-trailer combinations, the numbers are different but add up to the same outcome.

          In fact, the only bonneted truck available new in Germany that I know of is the Mercedes Zetros, which is a heavy-duty off-road number, based on the Actros/Arocs mechanically but closer to the Unimog in style and capability. You don’t see many of them even in heavy construction work although it would suit them well, because they’re too expensive — most of the few I’ve seen were either rescue vehicles or used for road maintenance (snowplows and such).

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @jhefner
          Conventional Trucks are basically a preserve of NA. Even in Australia long haul trucks, logging trucks are going Cabover. Currently on a trip across Australia and surprised how many Cabover HDT’s there are
          Fuel Economy newer New Cabovers have better fuel economy than Conventionals. Comfort ergonomics, safety all better

          • 0 avatar
            Ermel

            New cabovers may be better than new bonneted trucks, but not because they’re cabovers. (Maybe because many of them are European, though. :-)

            Fuel economy is essentially a function of aerodynamics, and making a bonneted truck aerodynamically good is easier than with a cabover that’s essentially 2.5 by 3.5 metres of vertical wall in the wind.

            Ergonomics and comfort would be better in a bonneted truck as well, with the floor closer to the ground (easier entry, more height, more space) and the engine further away (less noise, less heat).

            And safety? You could and would design a modern bonneted truck with its engine as deep in the frame as it is on cabovers, of course. So the center of gravity would be lower in all. Naturally, the engine would have to pass under the cab in a crash. The essentially empty room under the bonnet means a sleeker bonnet design is possible (again, better aerodynamics and also better roadview), and the remaining space could be used for secondary equipment like air compressor and airtanks, electronic components, maybe even storage for load safety utensils and other stuff that doesn’t mind getting hot too much.

            Google “Scania T” for an example of such a bonneted truck — it’s old, granted, but it clearly shows the possibilities. Note that the cab is identical to the Scania R cabover.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @ Eremel
            Not the experience in Australia. Bonneted Trucks have higher fatality rates. Heavier fuel use and are not as comfortable m reason they are selling a lot better rhan Conventionals

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Very few drivers would pick a COE over a conventional, when given a natural choice. I’ve driven COEs and the near horizontal steering wheel makes for a very long day. You can’t wait to climb out of the mofo.

            But in a crash, a driver’s biggest enemy might be the kinetic energy of the 60,000 lbs shortly behind them.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Ermel
            We get European, US, Australian and Japanese Trucks. Bulk of those are Cabovers. US/ Australian are split 50/50
            Con/ Cabovers. Europeans all Cabovers, same with Japanese

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            CABOVERS RULE
            All othet trucks are STUPID! Australia wins. Again.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    How many series do you need?

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    I saw one of the new Rangers in Dallas recently, wearing Mexican plates. I wanted to stop and get pictures of it, but it was in a gas station and the owner was filling it up, plus I was in a hurry to get somewhere.

    I do like the Everest, the Mondeo and Focus wagons. The B-Max is better looking than the C-Max we get here. The S-Max reminds me of the old M-B R-Class.

  • avatar
    Heino

    Well done Corey. Are those suicide doors on the rear of the B Max?

  • avatar
    Felix Hoenikker

    I saw one Ford Ranger on my recent trip to Ireland. I even photographed it, but have not gotten around to downloading the photos from my camera. In twelve days, I saw a total of three pickups. The Ford Ranger was the largest; the other two being compacts.
    The Ranger is more stylish than the GM mid sized PUs sold here, but in crew cab form, the bed is a cruel joke for hauling anything larger than a case or two of Guinness. Like here, the Irish seem to be in love with mid sized CUVs despite $5 per gal gasoline. That the love does not extend to pickups shows that the Irish have some respect for TCO unlike the drivers here who buy full sized PUs and never use them for much more than grocery getter and commuter duty.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Felix Hoeniker
      You would see few Pickups in Ireland, they are used as 4×4 forvoccaisonal off road forays. Carrying loads is restricted to cab chassis Vans. Pickups night tow something that is it

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Maybe because pickups here have a far lower TCO here? Because they’re often heavily discounted, gas is cheap, maintenance isn’t much, and most are as reliable as the sun.

      But damn people for buying what they want, and not the bare minimum of what they need. Do you ride a bike everywhere? Or do you normally buy and drive something you like that is roomy and comfortable for you and makes you happy?

  • avatar
    readallover

    Thank you, Corey! I always enjoyed when one of the carmags had the feature `cars you cant get here`.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I had a Focus wagon in France. It was actually pretty good, and the diesel engine got the job done. Not exactly what I would call thrilling. I felt like the power band changed every time I accelerated.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    The Ranger we will see in the US is not going to be based on the old Global Ranger. That truck is at the end of its life cycle. The one we get will be am “all” new Ranger with a new body and chassis. Sure they will certainly carry over some things like the differentials, transmissions and switch gear. But as we’ve told the wonders down under the new truck will be new not based on the old design.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Scoutdude
      It is being developed in Geelong Victoria and will be identical to the Global one.
      No, there will not be much change from the current one
      New Ranger very similar to the old Global Ranger

      • 0 avatar
        Guitar man

        Bet you anything the RHD model will be different to the US version.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        NO the new truck is a new truck, not just a refresh of the old one. Certainly it will look similar and have similar dimensions as the old truck. The US power trains will be different to meet the expectations of the US market and the US emissions regulations. There will also be other differences to meet the US safety regulations, flame retardant interior materials, better air bags ect.

        The Bronco is being designed in the US, the Australian operations are just doing the CAD and testing.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @Scoutdude
          Tbey are also designing ” doing Auto cad”

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            nobody uses AutoCAD for this stuff.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @JimZ
            What ever the current design software is
            Scoutdude mentioned Autocad which I thought was a bit odd

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            No I didn’t mention AutoCad one of the early computer programs now generically referred to a CAD.

            Yes the Aussies are doing CAD but it is at the CAD Monkey level.

            The product planners are in Dearborn as are the Architects. The set the specification did the basic layout and then it is all sent down under for the CAD Monkeys to do things like add the bolts ect.

            Just because someone does the CAD and the D stands for Design doesn’t mean that they are a designer.

  • avatar
    spookiness

    The sedan version of the Ka/Figo is the Aspire. At least in India. I thought the Gen1 Figo was kind of neat. The current one not do much, but the built in smartphone mount in the dash is clever. Wish my car had it.

  • avatar
    jhefner

    Cory;

    Enjoyed this very much, thank you. I take it that the Australian Ford Falcon did not make the cut because production has ended/will be ending?

    Regarding the Ford Ka, I thought the first generation was cute and unique, like the first generation Scions. I have a paper model of one in my Ford lineup. (Maisto makes a diecast of the StreetKa, but it is 3 inch instead of 1/64 scale.)

    The second generation Ka was just a facelifted Fiat 500. The third and current generation is a unique car again; but is “too normal” to stand out, like the later Scions.

    I think putting the new corporate face on the EcoSport is an improvement over the original shown here. I made a paper model of the EcoSport to add to my display:

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/75105572@N08/34596463982

    I built it twice to get the details worked right. Recently, I took the cardstock wheels off the first build, and glued the axles and wheels from a very cheap diecast car I took apart. It works so well I wished I knew I was going to do this, and added some washers or coins for weight.

    I started on the Escort, but did not finish flattening out all the parts, adding build tabs, and doing a test build:

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/75105572@N08/14685400415

    I have found a Ford Galaxy diecast by Siku and I think others, but plead guilty to not buying one yet. Haven’t found a 1/64 scale model of a B Max, Everest, Ranger, or S Max.

    Never heard of the Tourneo Courier; thanks. No diecast of it either. There is a Matchbox Ford Cargo from 2013 as well; whoda thunk. Just picked one up on e-bay.

    Once you finish the forbidden fruit of today; you could have fun looking at forbidden fruit of the past; so many oddities like the Ford Corcel in Brazil.

    • 0 avatar
      Corey Lewis

      That’s right, the Falcon and Territory RWD vehicles have ceased production, though they’re still listed under the new options on the Ford AUS site.

      You really put a lot of time and effort into your models!

      • 0 avatar
        jhefner

        Thanks Cory. Here is my completed EcoSport model with the plastic wheels and metal axles next to a Ford Supervan diecast. (The Supervan was a Ford Transit body mounted on a Ford GT40 chassis.)

        https://www.flickr.com/photos/75105572@N08/34631104951

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @Corey Lewis
        When they go. It will be grim times for Ford in Australia from making 150,000 sales to now barely registering. Thank you Alan Mullaly another job well done. Ford did their best to strangle the potential of Falcon Territory sales and now have virtually nothing.
        It seems Mullaly’s magic is now working on Detroit and rhe rest of rhe Ford empire.
        Tell me when rhey become the 8th largest Global Automotive Company

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          Yes, stupid Alan Mullaly, saving the company from worldwide bankruptcy. We all know the millions of cars Ford sells around the world just isn’t the same without a few thousand in Australia.

          Why don’t you thank your fellow countrymen for buying Toyota Corollas instead of Falcons and Commodores? Don’t you think that if they were still selling as strongly as they did in the past, that they would be worth redesigning and keeping in production?

          No, that’s stupid. Carmakers don’t need to make money or make rational decisions based on market trends and the cost of doing business. They just need to make people who don’t buy their products happy (which will never happen).

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    Ranger: Note how much bigger it is in that photo than the cars around it. Like other trucks, they have grown too large for the market segment in which it began. If I buy a Ranger, it will be because it’s the best of what’s available and not because it’s what I want. The more I see it, the less likely it becomes that I will buy one.

    The Ranger, by the way, is the ONLY vehicle in those photos that caught my eye. The rest are just differently-sized clones of each other.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      “The rest are just differently-sized clones of each other.”

      And all automakers lineups aren’t that way? Similar flavor, different size?

      “Like other trucks, they have grown too large for the market segment in which it began.”
      Which other trucks? The F-150 that has grown 7 inches in about 20 years time? The Ram pick up that hasn’t grown one bit since 1994? Or the Silverado that is pretty much the same as it ever was?

      Better make a truck out of a Fiesta, so we can use it to haul our cattle to the stockyard and pick up a load of cinder blocks on the way home.

  • avatar
    rolando

    Love that Transit Courier! It would be a great competitor for the Kia Soul!

  • avatar
    Dr. Claw

    I would take a Mondeo wagon over an Edge, each and every time. Raised driving position and extra heft in the name of… whatever it is, is for suckers.

  • avatar
    Dr. Claw

    The previous generation Mondeo’s “liftback” version was a genius design. It looked like a sedan from most angles, but the boot and back window lifted up to a huge opening (not unlike say… a recent Skoda Octavia). I would have loved to have seen that here as well.

    Current gen pretty much differentiates its look from the familiar sedan version.

  • avatar
    rolando

    Love the Transit Courier! Could be a great competitor for the Kia Soul!


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  • Joss: Not trying to be dismissive. But this is kinda small fry. I bet bribes are bigger $$$ in places like China,...
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