By on March 20, 2016

2013 GMC Acadia, Image: General Motors

General Motors will rely on the same trick it has with other models by continuing production of the current GMC Acadia and giving it the Limited moniker, reports Automotive News.

However, unlike the Impala Limited that’s only sold to fleets, the current-generation GMC Acadia will be sold alongside its smaller, lighter replacement on dealer lots come this spring, much like the Cruze Limited.

Brian Goebel, spokesperson for General Motors, confirmed the decision and stated it was based on production logistics.

From Automotive News:

The decision was largely a manufacturing one. Production of the new Acadia will be in Spring Hill, Tenn., rather than at the GM plant in Lansing, Mich., where the current Acadia is built alongside its platform siblings, the Buick Enclave and Chevrolet Traverse. The next-generation Enclave and Traverse will be built in Lansing but aren’t expected to go on sale until mid-2017.

GM wants to keep a full production schedule at the Lansing plant until another product can fill the Acadia’s void.

“Given the fact that those sister vehicles will continue their production, the current Acadia will continue to be built to offer another option for our customers,” Goebel said.

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89 Comments on “GMC Keeps Old Acadia New With Limited Nameplate...”


  • avatar
    gasser

    Fleet sales, subsidized leases, cash on the hood. GM knows how to keep moving those vehicles. With these “Limited” models, I’m never quite sure if I should be considering them as “outmoded” technology or as “tried and true” products. The “Limited” Impala seemed to provide my fellow posters with good service. Perhaps a subsidized lease on an Acadia “Limited” is what I need to replace an aging soft ute. I do know that my Dad told me never to buy the first year of a GM product, and I still think that such wisdom still holds as true in 2016 as it did in the 1960s.

    • 0 avatar
      200Series

      Move along…our 2013 Acadia ate two engines in 20k miles, along with all the typical shoddy build quality stuff (which I expected…the engines, not so much.)

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “I do know that my Dad told me never to buy the first year of a GM product, ”

      Meh – I’ve got one of the first GMT-900 Tahoes ever built in the now defunct Janesville, WI plant. Other than the oil consumption issues due to the AFM(1 quart every 1.5K miles) it’s been pretty darn reliable for the first 125K miles. Only recall was the windshield washer fluid heater that could catch fire which wasn’t a big deal and nothing we ever used or missed.

      I also just pick up a 2013 Volt and it isn’t any better reliability wise than a 2011. So sometimes they get it right w/first model year..

      My sister, who hates mini-vans, loves her Saturn Outlook but it’s proven to be less than bullet proof compared to the Nissan Pathfinder they had before it. So she’s not too happy about that. And i’m the one that told her, don’t worry, the Saturn will be just as reliable as your Pathfinder – Whoops!…….LOL Maybe I should tell her to trade it in on one of these classics. Should have the bugs/defects worked out by now. Not sure if she’ll buy another GM product or not.

    • 0 avatar
      Sjalabais

      I do know that my Dad told me never to buy … a GM product.

      Fixed that for you.

      With a statisticians approach and a cautious nature treating hard earned money, I can only assume the above correction must have been your father’s intentional advice.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Well, in the case of the Acadia and the other Lambda vehicles, they really are that outdated. They’re the only consumer General Motors vehicles not to be on the Global A electronics architecture that debuted 7 model years ago (2010). And reliability-wise, they’re hit-and-miss anyway, even a full ten years after they were first released. They like to go through transmissions, notably…and a lot of them have issues with the ubiquitous GM 3.6-liter DI V6, for some reason.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Kyree S. Williams,
        Timing belts?? I thought the timing belt issue was resolved?

        Also, did the US have the same timing belt issues with their SIDI 3.6’es?

        It took a while to fix that here.

        You can blame GMH and Caddy for that design flaw.

        • 0 avatar
          bts

          The Traverse / Acadia / Enclave might be on an old platform (from 2007?) but they’re hardly outdated. They’re still competitive against the other midsize crossovers making good use of their size for interior space and their fuel economy is still competitive for their size and power since they’re a bit larger and more powerful than other midsized. This is proved by sales of Lambda vehicles are going up.

          Just goes to show that GM was ahead of the competition back in 2009. Not everyone was using 6 speed autos and direct injection was rare. Back in 2009 wasn’t Honda just getting over those millions of defective 5-speed autos in the Odyssey, Pilot, Accord etc?

        • 0 avatar
          wmba

          @BAFO

          Timing chains my friend, not belts. And not the only GM engine of the period to have chain problems. The big fours aren’t great. And how about the BMW 1.6l diesel, the worst of the timing chain lot if percentages count – like 100% failure

          If they’d have stayed with belts, which miserly consumers always complain about changing at high mileage, much of this chain crap would have been avoided. Single row chains for cheapness and on the edge for durability, and tensioner pad design by sticking a finger up in the air and taking a WAG, after the design program told them all was well when it wasn’t. Chain eats tensioner pad, kerblooey.

          And not a word out there really. Everyone just assumes they were just the unlucky one. Well, why every nitwit knows rubber cogged belts are no good. Said it before, will say it again, belts are better, don’t stretch like chains between dohc cam phasers and are quieter.

          Mine is a lonely voice, but WTF, I don’t care.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “If they’d have stayed with belts..”

            GM should have stuck with the cam-in-block design on anything with more than 4-cylinders because it is about the only thing they are good at.

            Even if a pushrod engine requires maintenance to its (considerably shorter) timing chain or gears during its lifetime, the design is very simple.

            Plus the current 4.3 Silverado gets better or equal fuel economy to the Lambdas.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            Also, FWIW, the newer LFX version of the 3.6 seems to have much fewer issues with its timing chain than the earlier LY7 and LLT versions of the V6.

            However, the LFX never went into the Lambdas.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Oh, Kyree,
        As for transmissions, it isn’t just GM that has transmissions that are hit and miss. I think most any manufacturer has transmission problems.

        Transmissions will become more an issue for vehicle owners to maintain (reliability) in the future as the complexity of them increases.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Unlike many other automakers, GM has been cutting back on rental fleet sales and has been growing commercial fleet sales.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Buying the last year of a GM is usually the safest bet.

  • avatar
    highdesertcat

    “never to buy the first year of a GM product”

    Sage advise, but it also applies to other OEMs, not just GM, for example both the 2011 and 2014 WK2 Jeep Grand Cherokee and the 2009 North American-built Toyota Highlander.

    Members of my family have first-hand experience with first-year glitches in those vehicles, and many more reported problems in the new Cherokee, and others.

    • 0 avatar
      eggsalad

      Shoot. I just bought a first-year model Acura. Of course, since it’s a 1990, I suspect all of the kinks have been worked out.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        LOL! You might just want to hold on to that one.

        A guy I know bought one of the original first-year Legends new for his wife and they still have it today. They have other cars to be sure but they still have that Legend.

        These days, the Legend is HIS daily driver to/from his work at White Sands Missile Range while the wife has moved up to an Avalon for her daily drive to/from the Customs Complex in El Paso.

        Quite a daily commute for each of them; ~100 round trip for him and ~200 round trip for her.

        I don’t think they make them as reliable and durable any more like they did in 1990.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      I bought the first model-year of the MK.7 Golf (SportWagen), which was MY2015. It’s been quite reliable across 21K miles, but I was burned in that Volkswagen included a far better CarPlay-enabled radio in *all* of its cars for MY2016.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        As a car-enthusiast you probably take better care of your vehicles than most drivers and notice anything that is out of specs before it develops into a serious malfunction.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      highdesertcat,
      Grand Cherokee’s are still hit and miss in quality and reliability. Especially the electronics. The lack of decent electronics.

      Here you can get a great Grand or a sh!t Grand. The probem here is FCA/Chrysler has crappy after sales customer service.

      Toyota also isn’t what it used to be. I have heard of many issue with dual mass clutches on the 4 litre V6 Hiluxes self destructing when expected to work.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        I’m afraid you’re right. But it’s no longer a concern of mine. I donated our Grand Cherokee toward the transportation needs of my grand daughter when she got married in June 2015.

        We’re “all Toyota all the time” these days. I only regret I didn’t do this upgrade to Toyota products much, much earlier, like last century. I could have avoided much grief not driving that rolling schit from Detroit until 2008.

        Yep, I’m a Toyota convert, and proud of it. I shoulda done it sooner. Wasted my time and money on Detroit iron for more than 50 years of my driving life during my 70 years on this planet.

        • 0 avatar
          NormSV650

          Last century was the best Toyota’s. Not sure that the competition hasn’t caught up and in some instances surpassed them today.

          The soon to be in-laws are the last Toyota hold outs in their family along with holding onto their flip phones, everybody else has switched to Escapes and Fusions to accompany their smart phones.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            NormSV650, I can only tell you that today’s four Toyota products I currently own, have left me a satisfied customer.

            I converted to the Toyota religion in July 2008 with the purchase of our Highlander, but I also bought a used 1989 Camry V6 from my best friend, last year.

            The quality, ride and handling of our 2015 Sequoia and my 2016 Tundra to me seem outstanding.

            But tastes are subjective. I’m happy, and that’s all that matters. Wouldn’t have it any other way.

          • 0 avatar
            NormSV650

            Flip phone or slider? :)

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I have a slider now myself, you people and your phablets look ridiculous.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Slider like a Blackberry slider? Or like a LG Chocolate from 2005 slider…

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            In my case, no phone. Seriously.

            I gave my TracFone to Nguyen, my former assistant and now the owner/proprietor of his own contractor business.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        Oh, definitely. FCA is hit-and-miss, as this Australian found out: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5sVmoOZRypk

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    Other brands should be doing the same thing. Think of it:
    BMW E39 M5 Limited
    Honda S2000 Limited
    Mazda FD RX7 Limited

    • 0 avatar
      Sjalabais

      I guess the “limited” word is a bit off though – what’s limited here? The production schedule?

      Volvo used to sell last year production cars as “Classic”-versions, highly optioned. The 940 classic is probably the standard production car in its generation with the lowest depreciation – and values have been rising again for years.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        GM used to call them “Classic” as well.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Yup. We owned a (used) Caprice “Classic” and sold it a year later after the transmission bolts had worked themselves loose, or were never tightened during assembly in the first place.

          What a rolling piece of schit.

        • 0 avatar
          Richard Chen

          IIRC there’s actually a trademark owner for the term “Classic” that GM (and Coca-Cola) had to pay out to for. Not so with LimiTeD as many carmakers have (ab)used that moniker.

          • 0 avatar
            Sjalabais

            The trademark system is just plainly broken if simple words like “classic” can earn protection.

        • 0 avatar
          Featherston

          As far as I know, there never was a model year where a new Caprice model and an older Caprice Classic model were produced concurrently. It was simply a name change. (Confusingly, Wikipedia’s contributors peg it as occurring both in ’73 and ’77. I think it was the latter, although it’s also conceivable that within a single model year they could have coexisted as different trim levels.)

          I wonder what year HDC’s Caprice Classic was. Apparently the ’77-’79s were the best of the breed; a decontenting occurred for ’80 model year. My grandmother had a ’78 that genuinely was a good car. She had it for 10+ years with virtually no problems. It really was the car that got my extended family back in the mindset of keeping a car 5-15 years rather than 1-3, something we hadn’t collectively done since before WWII. (The ’26 Cadillac is remembered fondly, as it gave good service up through 1940 and had the good grace to wear out immediately before auto production ended rather than immediately after.)

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            “I wonder what year HDC’s Caprice Classic was.”

            We bought it used in Jan 1980 from an USAF guy going to Kadena, Okinawa. Could not take it with him.

            I believe it was a 1978, but it could have been made in 1977.

            I don’t remember when the original buyer bought it, nor when it was made. But it was sold through Sacramento Motors, a local GM dealer. And they had the history on it as dealer of record and resale.

            We kept it maybe a little over a year. That year group may have been the best of the bunch but my wife did not care for it so we traded the Caprice and bought her a brand new 1982 VW Quantum to commute to college in, based on our excellent experiences with VW while we were in Germany for eight years.

            Boy, were we wrrrrrrronggggggggg about American VWs.

          • 0 avatar
            Featherston

            Not good when the best of the breed lets you down. Ugh. And theoretically that should’ve been the sweet spot of sweet spots: built after the line had had a few months to work out the bugs but well in advance of the decontenting.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Yup. It was what it was, another one of my life experiences.

            Our base of reference was our 1972 Olds Custom Cruiser 455. Now that was a car!

            The Caprice not so much.

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        “I guess the “limited” word is a bit off though – what’s limited here? The production schedule?”

        Consumer demand.

      • 0 avatar
        scrubnick

        What is “limited?” The amount of changes made compared to the previous model year.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    You go, GM. Milk those cash-cows.

    For all their faults and outdated technology, the Lambda crossovers feel more cavernous than anything else on the market since they’re basically big minivans with conventional hinged doors (although the Pathfinder and new Pilot come close). The new Acadia, like the author said, will be much smaller, so that does leave a void. You could argue that there’s no reason to keep the old Acadia going since its Lambda siblings, the Enclave and Traverse, were slated to continue for at least another year. But ever since GM quit outright using the same bodyshells across all of its brands, each Lambda has people firmly in its camp in terms of design appeal. A lot of people really like the Acadia’s squared-off styling cues, and wouldn’t at all be interested in the Enclave or Traverse.

    So, it’s a smart move…I guess.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Limited/special edition packages used to be all the rage here in the 80s and started dying out in the 90s. The dying out of these limited package vehicles conincided with the rollout of the liberation of our vehicle market. Greater competition is needed when a company can offer limited/special packages.

    This is highly evident in the US pickup market and especially by GM with all of their limited/special edition vehicles. This highlights the need for more compeition or displays the ability to allow in more competition.

    • 0 avatar
      mikey

      So Big Al from Oz….(notice I used your approved title) . Your telling us that there is some sort of restriction on imported trucks? Would that be the “chicken tax ?

      Certainly news to me. I’m sure that I can’t be the only guy, that was not aware, of such treachery . You really need to keep the rest of us informed.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        mikey,
        Thanks for the use of my name.

        Here it appears as the market became more competitive through the Button Plan for the motor vehicle industry these limited/special edition vehicles dried up. Every now and then at the end of a model’s life there might be a “limited/special” edition with a heft price cut to move the vehicles.

        The US has over 250 thousand vehicles per model sold a year. In a large EU nation it is between 40-60 thousand. In Australia it’s 12 thousand now.

        So, yes, I do see scope for an increase in manufacturer/brands available to the US consumer. This will increase competition and reduce prices as well.

        I mean, if pickups can have a 25% rate of profit and cars around 3% then don’t you think there is something askew with the pickup market?

  • avatar
    mikey

    Just a little info here folks…..The “W” Impala limited/ Classic will cease production early June 2016.

    Sorry to interrupt a good old “TTAC GM bash. Carry on .

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Noooooo.

      • 0 avatar

        I am genuinely disappointed to hear that.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          So is Avis. Thank God for the Captiva Sport and Malibu Classic.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            I just had a ’15 Limited with 18k miles as a rental, so I have some very fresh impressions.

            This was an oddly packaged duck, with the awful vinyl steering wheel, but a moonroof and 17 inch alloy wheels.

            Pros: 3.6L V6 is a beast, very soft/comfy ride (for the most part, see below), velour seats are roomy and comfortable, throttle calibration and steep 1st gear allows for very smooth starts

            Cons: A number of interior rattles over harsh pavement, unexpected occasional suspension harshness, lots of unwanted body motion/lean in corners, tiny sideview mirrors, transmission a bit too eager to unlock torque converter and/or drop a gear, resulting in observed 26mpg over a almost 100% highway drive totally babying the car at 70-72mph to see what I could squeeze out of it.

            I definitely see the value of these, in a McDonalds “hits the spot, most calories for the $” sort of way. A 1-2 year old V6 Accord/Camry bought for $20k will blow it away in almost any dynamic measure, but when these Impala Limiteds can be scooped up with about 20k miles for $11,500, it’s a different story.

    • 0 avatar
      brettc

      Hey Mikey,

      I had a rental 2016 Impala last week (new body style). Picked it up in Detroit and drove it to Ontario to visit family. It was built 1/2016 in Oshawa. Had about 3500 kms on it.

      Pretty solid car, and if I had to choose between it and a Passat, I’d choose the Impala despite being a VW guy.

      So despite the general GM hatred on here, I was actually surprised at how nice it was. Panel gaps were good, the interior was absent of squeaks and it didn’t do bad for economy with the 4 cylinder engine in it. Your colleagues in Oshawa seem to be building some decent cars at the moment.

  • avatar
    nickoo

    With all the choices for 3 row cross-overs out there now-a-days. I genuinely do not know why anyone would choose this one or one of it’s siblings. Judging by the fact I rarely see them, most other people don’t either.

    Durango would be my first choice, even if it would age like garbage and be worn out in 5 years. If I wanted something reliable and efficient, highlander or pilot seem like they would better fit the bill. Even Explorer or Flex seems like they would be a better option.

    If I were going BOF I would first check out Sequoia and then Expedition. This is coming from a current Tahoe owner–what a horrible vehicle to daily drive.

    • 0 avatar
      Bob

      Because of the second row bucket seats available in lower trim levels. When you have 2 child seats in the second row, folding the (bench) seat forward to access the third row can be difficult or impossible. With the second row bucket seats you have a nice space in the middle where you can access the 3rd row easily. Most vehicles in this category only have second row bucket seats in the highest trim levels.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        “With the second row bucket seats you have a nice space in the middle where you can access the 3rd row easily. ”

        Having put 4 kids and 3 adults in my sisters Saturn Outlook for a day trip – BAM! The 3rd row easily seats 3 kids.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      You must be in a special place, cause I see all three variants every damn day, and several times over. They are immensely popular.

    • 0 avatar
      qwerty123

      The lambda’s are still the only full size crossovers. You can easily carry 7 people and all their luggage.

      GMC Acadia vs Pilot,Explorer, and Highlander 2006:

      http://www.cars.com/go/compare/trimCompare.jsp?acodes=USB70GMS241A0,USB70HOS032A0,USB70FOS101A0,USB70TOS141A0

      GMC Acadia vs Pilot,Explorer, and Highlander 2016:

      http://www.cars.com/go/compare/trimCompare.jsp?acodes=USC60GMS241A0,USC60HOS032A0,USC60FOS101A0,USC60TOS141A0

      Interesting. The current midsize CUV’s are almost the same size.

      GMC Acadia vs Yukon,Expedition, and Sequoia:

      http://www.cars.com/go/compare/trimCompare.jsp?acodes=USC60GMS241A0,USC60GMS031A0,USC60TOS131A0,USC60FOS301B0

  • avatar
    Rday

    GM is like the Donald. They keep getting alot of free coverage even after years of defrauding the american consumer. At lease the Donald has something new to offer unlike, GM. It amazes me how much time/press is give here on this web site to the likes of GM and FCA.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      ” It amazes me how much time/press is give here on this web site to the likes of GM and FCA.”

      It’s minuscule compared to the coverage given the total non-player VW, as in ttavw dot com.

  • avatar
    mikey

    Rday……GM and FCA sell a whole lot of vehicles . I suspect that among the readership here, we have a whole lot of GM and FCA owners.

    Unlike TTAC of the past. I believe that TTAC gives a fair and balanced, coverage of all things automotive.

  • avatar
    mikey

    HDC ……The VW story is the biggest piece of auto manufacturing news , since the much debated GM Chrysler bailout .

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Is that a new Mustang, mikey? Congrats! Did you go for the GT? I bet you did.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Hey Mikey, congrats on the new ‘stang! Enjoy it!

      I don’t know about the VW story being the biggest piece of auto manufacturing news. I don’t know of anyone who even cares about VW.

      In the US VW is a minuscule niche entry in a SAAR of more than 17million – a statistical anomaly.

      But for those who chose to own, buy or lease a VW, I guess it would be like getting their noses rubbed in it, over and over again, and again. At least they had a choice. It wasn’t like VW was the only brand out there or that someone twisted their arm to get them to buy a VW.

      And it isn’t like VW was the only OEM that ever tried to pull the wool over our eyes. Too many other examples by Detroit, and in some cases people actually died. No one died because of VW’s cheating.

      As always, some of the comments offered by the B&B are reply or response worthy, and the best part of ttac. I do enjoy learning what other people think or how they perceive the automotive world around them.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        See, even though I’ve had 3 Volkswagens (and two of the perpetrating TDIs), I really don’t feel like I’m getting my nose rubbed in it. What Volkswagen did was noteworthy, and so news outlets like TTAC are giving it appropriate coverage. No reason to get my feelings bent out of shape about it. My current VW will probably be my last just because the competition is getting much stronger. I feel like Ford and Mazda both cover the whole premium feel and driving excitement thing that VW used to provide, and with more bang-for-your-buck.

  • avatar
    mikey

    Thanks Kyree……Yes it is a 15 ….not a GT though : ( …..Too much money , up here in Canuckistan. …I opted for the 2.4 T . It’s has the premium package ,and came with all the toys. I had 2011 Camaro 2SS , nice car , but , frankly it was too much car for me. For me, right now ? The Mustang checks all the boxes . So far ? I love it , all the power I need, and it’s a blast to drive. Time will tell if the 2.4 Turbo was the right choice.

  • avatar
    Johnster

    No one has yet speculated on what will happen at the Lansing, Michigan plant when the current generation Enclave, Traverse and GMC Acadia Classic will be updated.

    Do you suppose that the Acadia Classic will be replaced with a new GMC wearing a different nameplate? Or perhaps replaced by a Cadillac-badged version of the Enclave/Traverse? The CT7?

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    I still don’t get GM’s logic with downsizing the Acadia. Bring out a equinox-acadia tweener and call it something else, sure. But to cut one of their few hot sellers that hundreds of thousands of families appreciate specifically due to their large and roomy interiors seems insane.

    “Hey guys, we have this spacious 3 row CUV that people are snapping up because it’s the roomiest in its class, I know, let’s downsize it!”

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      You know, considering this. When has downsizing -ever- worked for a model in America’s car history? Where sales increased on a nameplate after downsizing.

      Anyone?

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        77 B-bodies.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          OH YOU WENT THERE.

          No, I forgot that one. Other than that?

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          28 cars, I think that in the B-body example, they managed to package things in such a way that passenger room, aside from some hip room, was not diminished much. With this new Acadia, we’re losing an entire row of seats (which were best in class for comfort and space), as well as best in class cargo room. They had a niche totally to themselves and are throwing it away.

          • 0 avatar
            qwerty123

            Really, they’re getting rid of the third row? I thought they were going to downsize it enough to reclassify it as a midsize.

            http://www.motortrend.com/news/2016-gmc-acadia-remain-sale-alongside-new-2017-model/

            This Motortrend article claims

            “GM’s decision to keep producing the old Acadia was to ensure that the Lansing plant kept a full production schedule since the next-generation Traverse and Enclave aren’t expected to go on sale until 2017 and will be built on a long wheelbase version of the 2017 Acadia’s platform.

            Compared to the old model, the 2017 GMC Acadia is shorter by 7.2 inches in length, 3.5 inches narrower , and 3.9 inches lower. The new crossover is also 700 pounds lighter and is available with seating for up to seven passengers.”

            If this article is accurate, the Acadia has optional third row seating, and the LWB version is the vehicle I was expecting.

            http://www.motortrend.com/news/2017-gmc-acadia-first-look-review/

            According to this article.

            “GMC says the new midsize 2017 GMC Acadia slots between the compact Terrain crossover and full-size Yukon SUV.”

            http://www.goodcarbadcar.net/2016/03/usa-midsize-suv-crossover-sales-figures-february-2016-ytd.html

            GM probably believes that downsizing will lead to better sales.

            http://www.cars.com/go/compare/trimCompare.jsp?acodes=USC60GMS241A0,USC60HOS032A0,USC60FOS101A0,USC60TOS141A0

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        I’m coming up empty. That’s just not how America works.


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