By on February 9, 2016

01 Volkswagen Jetta

We knew it wouldn’t be easy for them. We knew it would get worse before it got better. But did you know it would be this difficult for Volkswagen of America to sell cars, and did you know it would get this bad this soon?

And could it get even worse?

Volkswagen brand sales in the United States tumbled 15 percent in January 2016, a year-over-year loss of 3,425 units. With barely more than 20,000 total sales, January 2016 sales fell to a 60-month low. Not since January 2011, when Volkswagen sold only 18,401 vehicles in America, has the company generated so little showroom activity.

Of course, five years ago, the market was much smaller. Volkswagen’s share of the market in January 2011 was a respectable – for Volkswagen’s U.S. operations – 2.2 percent.

Five years later, Volkswagen’s share of the industry’s volume slid to just 1.7 percent.

Only three years ago, Volkswagen grabbed 3.1 percent of the market in January 2013. Three months later, however, the long downward slide began. Between April 2013 and September 2014, Volkswagen sales would fall every month.

Those 18 months of decline had nothing to do with the inability of the brand to legally sell diesel-powered vehicles. Generally, TDIs accounted for approximately one in five Volkswagen sales.

The month the scandal broke, last September, Volkswagen sales rose 0.6 percent. (Sort of.) An even more modest 0.2 percent uptick in October, when the scandal was fully erupting, occurred as incentives shot through the roof. By November, the free fall was underway. Sales plunged 25 percent, a loss of nearly 8,000 sales compared with November 2014. During the last month of 2014, Volkswagen’s U.S. volume was down 9 percent. Compared with December 2012, when Volkswagen reported its best December results since 1970, the brand’s market share fell 1.4 percentage points.

2015-Volkswagen-Golf-Sportwagen

Back to the most recent results: The first month of 2016 was the lowest-volume January in the soon-to-be-discontinued Eos’s history with only 123 sales. Beetle sales fell below 1,000 units for the first time since September 2011, the month in which the current generation Beetle was going through the final phases of its launch sequence. Volkswagen pushed only 708 wagons: 706 Golf SportWagens and two remaining Jetta SportWagens. That was an improvement compared with January 2015, when Volkswagen was approaching a Jetta/Golf wagon transition, but just half the total achieved in January 2013.

January was the fifth four-digit sales month for the Jetta in the last 67 months. Touareg sales fell to a 63-month low. For a third consecutive month, Volkswagen sold fewer than 4,000 Passats. The three-month total between November and January was down 54 percent.

The Golf’s 5-percent decrease would almost be a bright light — the Golf’s daily selling rate was up 3 percent — if the Golf was a significant player in the small car arena. But the Golf’s compact car market share didn’t climb to 3 percent in January.

Similarly, the Tiguan continued to report improved results. Vastly improved results, in fact. January volume jumped 72 percent. But since Tiguan volume shot to a record high in October and broke that record in December, availability for discounted, outdated Tiguans isn’t great. Moreover, even in its best months, the Tiguan remained a bit player in the small SUV sector.

Never available in North America with a diesel in the first place, the surging Tiguan isn’t to blame for Volkswagen’s dilapidated January state. Rather, the brand’s top-selling cars, which were recently sold in diesel form, have simply lost those diesel sales. Passat, Jetta sedan, non-GTI/R/E Golfs, and wagons collectively plunged 20 percent last month.

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures. Follow on Twitter @goodcarbadcar and on Facebook.

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90 Comments on “Ugliest Sales Yet: January Was Nasty For Volkswagen...”


  • avatar
    gasser

    Great job redesigning the new Passat to look exactly like the old one. This does not exactly drive traffic into showrooms.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    *Rubs hands together* Good, good. Muhahaha!

    I really like the slidey adjustment on the chart – makes it cool and interactive!

    Also, the radar cruise cut-out on the lower valance of that Golf SportWagen looks very awkward and cheapo.

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      Credit to the ME, Mr. M.S.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      I actually like the way it looks. And at least they put it in the center, instead of off to the side, like they do for certain Bentley models, for example. (http://3-photos2.ebizautos.com/1769/14605068/14605068_3.jpg)

      But mine doesn’t have the radar.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        You bought a Continental GT and didn’t spring for the radar cruise?!

        :P

        http://media.caranddriver.com/images/15q1/654922/2015-vw-golf-sportwagen-tdi-manual-test-review-car-and-driver-photo-657899-s-original.jpg

        It’s such a big opening! I was thinking the M had better implementation (I don’t have it on mine) but… no. It’s a big mail slot.

        http://www.inautonews.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/2009_infiniti_m45_main630-0322-630×360.jpg

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I won’t get in it if it doesn’t have radar cruise.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          It’s actually not a radar for adaptive cruise control, or at least it wasn’t when I bought my Golf SportWagen. Part of the Driver Assistance Package, the radar was strictly for forward-collision warning and autonomous braking. You also got lane-departure parking sensors and a parking assistant with the Driver Assistance Package. The big thing I’d appreciate, along with adaptive cruise control, is blind spot monitoring…which isn’t available on the wagon. But mine doesn’t have DAP anyway; it’s the only package I’m missing.

          The radar in the Conti, on the other hand, is for adaptive cruise (dial on the left side of the wheel)

          http://st.motortrend.com/uploads/sites/5/2014/07/2015-Bentley-Continental-GT-Speed-Coupe-steering-wheel-details.jpg

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Man that piecemeal steering wheel is not elegant or appealing.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            No, it’s not. If you don’t have adaptive cruise, there’ll be nothing in the space where that dial is, making the design look unbalanced. Also, note the button blank for the heated steering wheel, which is evidently missing from that example. Kinda tacky on a car that expensive.

            Design-wise, I actually like the four-spoke wheel they used in most Continental GTs and all Continental Flying Spurs, prior to the major ’12 refresh. This aforementioned three-spoke wheel was available back then, but it was reserved only for sportier variants of the GT, like the Speed. Here’s the four-spoke:

            http://images.auction123.com/6d9335a8-7f78-4592-8d9e-13ea8835a4d0/SCBDR33W48C052138/12.jpg?wtrmk1024

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I agree, the 4-spoke really looked the same all the way back to the early 00s.

            http://www.palmaclassiccars.com/images-1/Bentley/00BentleyArnage/900/06-TK3A9229.jpg

            Which was similar to the 90s one.
            http://www.classiccarswest.com/1993-Bentley/steeringwheel.jpg

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Yep. Really, that wheel in your first link was on the pre-VW Bentleys and Rolls-Royces from 1998 and beyond, and was used all the way to the final 2010 Arnage, Azure and Brooklands.

            http://www.drivearabia.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/2008-Bentley-Arnage-R-6.jpg

            The four-spoke wheel in the Continental GT and Flying Spur was definitely more modeled after the Volkswagen four-spoke wheels of the early 2000s, like the one in the B5.5. Passat, first-gen Touareg, and specifically the Continental’s platform-cousin, the Phaeton. But it at least bears more of a resemblance to the classic Bentley airbag-equipped wheels.

            The 90s wheel was, I believe, Bentley/Rolls-Royce’s first airbag-equipped model. That was back in the days when the company would simply borrow major components from other companies as needed and source a lot of the parts from outside designers. I think that wheel came from a supplier because I’ve seen it on other cars, like this 2001 Morgan.

            http://i86.photobucket.com/albums/k110/paradigmy2k/2001%20morgan/2001morgan_after_interior1.jpg~original

            What do you think of the wheel on the newest Mulsanne? I kind of like it. It’s clearly inspired by the Audi models from which the Mulsanne borrows many of its interfaces, including the entire MMI system, but it still looks kind of classic.

            http://marketplace.affluentmagazine.com/vehicle_photos/ogara-coach-company/SCBBB7ZH4DC017606/SCBBB7ZH4DC017606-21.jpg

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Look at that creamy Arnage interior. How wonderful! Slabs of wood and volumes of leather, doors that weigh 400 pounds. Nomnom.

            I’m just okay with that Mulsanne wheel. Those thick lower spokes wouldn’t be usable or comfortable to hold onto, which is where I usually put my hand during normal cruising.

            The totally flat and circular cover reminds me of a little pizza pan.

            It’s still better than the Conti wheel. Also don’t like the inverse speedo at all. You’d have to look further down than necessary at normal driving speeds!

          • 0 avatar
            Drew8MR

            Re: Blind Spot Monitoring. Now,TBH I haven’t driven a huge variety of new cars, but is the visibility so bad now that proper mirror adjustment still leaves a blind spot? Because I can eliminate the blind spots from all 6 of our cars with the side view mirrors.

  • avatar
    Ubermensch

    Realistically, I wonder how low market share for the VW brand would have to be for VAG to consider killing the brand in the U.S. market? Or is that even a possibility? I just can’t see how VAG can justify the costs of certifying vehicles for this market for such low sales.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      The US market has been a point of pride and aggressive goals for VW. I think it would dent their honor considerably to bail on the market.

      Plus, it’s not like they’re going to pull Audi, Porsche, and Bentley as well. So I think VW will hang on.

    • 0 avatar
      hreardon

      The saving grace for VW is that the “group” (Audi, Lambo, Porsche, Bentley, specifically) share all kinds of resources and facilities throughout the US.

      Volkswagen can’t give up on the US market, they just need to get their house in order.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      I too wonder as to how low can they go. At some point the rebate/residual incentive what have you will be so great that a compelling argument could be made for a new Golf, Jetta, or Passat. Not the Tiguan, that thing is just stupid, but I digress. A $250 a month literal sign and drive lease, as in no cash outlay, for 24 months will get things turned around in short order. I know they have run cheaper lease deals but the fine print cash down is ussually more than most millenials have ever seen at one time.

      As much as I am appalled by what they have done, their product is still viable here and has a niche. I believe the dealer network may shrink a bit though.

      • 0 avatar
        notwhoithink

        I think that you’ve hit upon what I consider one of VW’s biggest problems in the US market: price. They started as “the peoples’ car” (literally). For a very long time they were a value brand. But in recent years they’ve been trying very hard to play off of the “German engineering” meme to try to associate themselves with luxury brands like Merc/BMW/Audi, despite a fair number of their models being designed and/or built in Mexico. I’ve actually seen/heard reps referring to them as a “luxury brand”, and that literally makes no sense. Let Audi be the luxury brand for VW. If they want to share engineering they can do like Honda/Toyota does with Acura/Lexus.

        They need to get back to basics, and market yourself as an entry-level German car that has solid design and build quality. Hook them on VWs when they’re in their early 20’s, and transition them to Audis in their 30’s.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          Or just generally provide the things that customers want, at a palatable price. I wasn’t able to get blind-spot monitoring in any trim on my Golf SportWagen. Meanwhile, Honda offers its Honda Sensing suite on any Civic, including the base model, as a standalone option package.

          • 0 avatar
            brettc

            VW used to do stuff like that years ago. My ’85 Jetta diesel 2-door had heated seats. No turbo, but it had heated seats. Heated seats should be available on every VW trim, you shouldn’t have to get a car with a sunroof to get bun warmers.

      • 0 avatar
        RideHeight

        “Not the Tiguan, that thing is just stupid”

        Could you expand on that? I know nothing about them besides really liking their looks.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          In theory, the Tiguan is fine. It is basically a lifted Mk5 Golf with slightly different styling.

          However, it offers very little over the Golf, besides an inch and a half in ground clearance.

          Everyone else offers more meaningful upgrades from compact hatchback to compact CUV.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            The Tiguan only makes sense at the most basic of trims. Everything else costs as much as a Lexus NX or an Infiniti QX50. Or a lower level MKC.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            It really is. I’ve never liked the Tiguan’s design. And it’s sub-compact, competing in an arena of much roomier crossovers (like the CR-V, Escape, Rogue and Equinox)…and at a premium. I had one as a loaner once and parked it next to my grandmother’s ’14 Soul. The Tiguan had a longer hood, but was otherwise identically-sized.

            The new 2017 Tiguan, at least in standard size, doesn’t appear to be much bigger, splitting the difference between the Golf and Golf SportWagen.

            http://st.motortrend.com/uploads/sites/5/2015/09/2017-Volkswagen-Tiguan-R-Line-side-rear-view.jpg

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Right, price and the existence of the Golf Sportwagen are other problems.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            The sweet spot, I think, will be the Golf Alltrack, a lifted and plastic-clad Golf SportWagen with AWD. And they *said* they were bringing it over to the U.S. But you just know it’ll be overpriced, to where the larger Outback would make more sense.

            Plus, the Golf SportWagen’s styling—specifically the sloped hood—doesn’t really lend itself to being turned into a crossover. It will still be very apparent that it’s a wagon, and that will turn a lot of people off.

            https://file.kbb.com/kbb/images/content/editorial/slideshow/volkswagen-golf-alltrack-europe-now-us-later/volkswagen-golf-alltrack-front-profile-static1-600-001.jpg

            I think there’s going to be an extended-length version of the Tiguan, though, at some point.

        • 0 avatar
          RideHeight

          Yeah, I guess it does look a little crampy.
          Thanks.

        • 0 avatar
          Wheatridger

          Since that sounds like a sincere inquiry, not the usual VW-bashing, let me attempt to explain the Tiguan’s appeal, in the eyes of one owner, at least.

          Last year, my wife decided to purchase our ’13 Tiguan SEL off lease. I did some due diligence beforehand, surveying the market to find interesting alternatives. We needed AWD and one-ton towing capacity, neither too hard to find in the market. Most compact crossovers had a larger footprint, with more cargo room, but she didn’t want that – she parks in a tight downtown garage, and wants nothing bigger to handle. Most competitors didn’t have a turbo, but we want that; we live in Denver, and do all our hard driving at altitude. The Focus had turbo, but we hated its angular overstyling. If the CX5 had a turbo option, I might have lobbied for it harder.

          The Tiguan offered us practical capabilities we needed, plus a perception of safety. Part of that was its “dated” nature, so criticized here. We didn’t trust first-producion-year cars full of novel features. The fact that the Tiguan had been produced for six years, every one with the same powertrain, reassures us and our mechanic, an indy VW specialist who sees them seldom, just for routine service. Novelty draws my attention, too, but it doesn’t always win my money.

          The Tiguan has its flaws. The back seat is uncomfortable. In our model year, the stereo was poor. Though the SEL, on sports suspension and 19s, feels like a big GTi…until I get in my real GTI, with deep seats that let you exploit that suspension and rides softer as well. But that’s my total list of flaws. it’s a very nice car, if you like crossovers. I’ve gotten over 30 mpg on mountain road trips, and Tiggy’s 2.0 TSI engine is powerhouse that flattens the mountain grades, even pulling a trailer.

          Yes, I know you could get a base Audi, BMW or Mercedes for almost the same money. Frankly, I liked them all better. But making the step to a luxury car is a psychological hurdle. I’ve been burned whenever I bought used luxury cars, and I still make the sign of the cross when I see an allroad.

          When we got the TIguan three years ago, I would count how many others I spotted. In a long day of Denver driving of 50 to 100 miles, I would see two a day, rather consistently. These days, I often see two at the same stoplight. Looks like they’ve been a slow but consistent seller, burrowing into a comfortable niche: nicer than a Subaru, more distinctive than a ToyHonda, more solid than the Koreans, less financially risky than the Luxuries.

          Among the VW faithful, the Tiguan’s great flaw was that it was the only VW with no TDI option. Now that’s it’s a claim of pride. Tiguans no longer have to compete with Sportwagen TDIs on the sales floor. It’s a much more even battle between them now.

          • 0 avatar
            RideHeight

            ZOMG… thanks for the detail and the sobriety. I can’t *not* be attracted to VW’s mature and elegantly restrained styling.

        • 0 avatar
          brettc

          I LOL’d at that line. They are stupid, which is why I’m so confused that people are buying them recently.

          They have less cargo space than a Golf wagon so I don’t get the point. Apparently some people like them though.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

        @87. What you say makes a lot of sense. Dont they sell a Golf 3 door, gas engine, manual trans, pretty much a base model? I could think of worse ways to commute, it makes a compelling argument against a Corolla or Sentra/base Altima as far as looks and drive anyway, even better if its stupid cheap. Get custom license plate: “NO TDI” lol

        I think Imma hit up their online configurator and see what kind of Golf Id have, just for fun.

    • 0 avatar
      alexndr333

      Too bad that both VoA and the EPA couldn’t be more creative in responding to all this. VW could have cleaned up a couple of power plants in the US to more than cover the net illegal emissions of all its diesels over their lifetimes. Then, the cars and their owners wouldn’t have been punished in the after-sale market; VW could have gained some positive publicity out of a disastrous management debacle; and the EPA could have gained more clean air. Instead, we get a window into VW’s ability to manage a crisis and the story will reside in MBA textbooks for decades to come on how not to do it.

  • avatar
    Chetter

    How do you say schadenfreude in German? Smug company who dislikes their customers. They wouldn’t do anything for me when my $1300 RNS-510 radio crapped out on me. Of course the radio has no internal part numbers and VW has no repair center to fix the radio so you are at their mercy to buy another $1300 radio.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      “How do you say schadenfreude in German?” COTD.

      Reminds me of the time I asked a friend to remind me the name of the Yankees player who had Lou Gehrig’s disease. Ah, nevermind.

      Anyhoo, why couldn’t you get a junkyard replacement for the radio?

      • 0 avatar
        Chetter

        It was a joke. I have the Touareg version of the RNS-510 which is about as common in the junkyard market as a dodo.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          Do you have the newer (2011-) Touareg? That’s actually an RNS-850 with a Touareg-specific faceplate. It’s used in the Phaeton (as the RNS-810, which may refer to a slightly smaller screen size), as well as the Bentley Continental and Flying Spur. The Porsche infotainment system may also be based upon the RNS-850. So—even with the new CarPlay-enabled radios—the RNS-850 is pretty much the top-tier Volkswagen infotainment system, outside of Audi’s MMI, which is also used by Lamborghini and the Bentley Mulsanne.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Meh.

    We say this with Toyota when they had to stop sell. After the stop sells and the earthquake, Toyota recovered.

    GM sales dipped on the initial news of the ignition switch scandal, and they just kept on going.

    Rolling over Ford Explorers and immolating Ford everything due to bad cruise control relays didn’t impact sales – but horrifically all oval designed Taurus did.

    Honda sales aren’t impacted by Claymore mines being in almost everything they built for the last 10 years, and being at least complicit it appears with covering up the issue with Takata. We know that Honda silenced their own engineers who tried to sound the alarm as far back as 2004.

    Toyota floor mats and gas pedal clearance issues killed people. Before you scream, “liar,” do a search on TTAC, find Jack’s own write up on the issue. It’s here and that is the truth.

    GM ignition switches killed people.

    Rolling over Ford Explorers and immolating Ford everything killed people.

    Claymore mines in Hondas, Toyotas (and yes Pontiacs) and just about any make and model not built by Toyota for GM, killed people.

    You can’t see or count the dead bodies due to VW. You can argue contributory maybe sort of, statistically speaking, but there is no way to count them up.

    If VW fails in ‘merica it won’t be because they cheated on emission systems. It will be because of how horribly they’ve handled this crisis every step of the way.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      VW had a hard time selling cars before the crisis as well. I’ve never seen a auto manufacturer with more contempt for its customers than VW. But can you imagine the position they’d be in if they swapped in Hyundai’s management style?

      I mean, if people don’t trust your cars to last, then give people a reason to trust you. Hyundai did it with long warranties, a long list of features, and a low price. Not that VW would ever do that. They’re nothing if not arrogant.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      OK, but VW isn’t Toyota.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Yes, January 2016 was bad, but the chart shows that every January is a low point for VW, with February and March rebounding a bit every year.

    I’d expect the same this year, although the overall downward trend is unmistakable.

    • 0 avatar
      hf_auto

      I was going to comment on the same thing, it just looks to me like a continuation of a much longer trend. YOY drops extend all the way back to 2013.

      If I wasn’t so lazy, I’d dump this data into a Causal Impact Analysis to actually measure the effect of the scandal. But I’m lazy…

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Which has more marketshare in USDM, Cadillac or VWoA?

  • avatar
    Robbie

    This article fails to make clear whether VW sales went down by more than simply the loss of their diesel vehicle sales. Also, it does not relate VW sales in a decent way to the age of their vehicle models and the possible need for a refresh.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      The Touareg, Jetta, Passat and Golf range were all redesigned or facelifted in ’15 or ’16. Whether or not those vehicles are competitive is another story, but they’re all pretty fresh. The Eos is already on its way out, and the Beetle may be as well. The only VW in dire need of a change is the Tiguan, which will see a redesign later this year (and is sure to be overpriced). And maybe the CC, although that’s kind of an irrelevant product and I wonder if VW will even bother to introduce a new one.

      • 0 avatar
        Robbie

        It is my impression that diesels were 20 to 25% of VW’s sales. Therefore, if we correct for the lost diesel sales by dividing current sales by 0.8 or 0.75, and we realize that overall total car sales are down 10% compared to a year ago, we could have concluded that VW is holding up rather marvelously, no?

        So, TTAC, let’s next publish the clickbait “VW SALES FANTASTIC IN SPITE OF CHEATING !!”

  • avatar
    EquipmentJunkie

    I’m not surprised by the flat January sales.

    VW’s sales recovery will continue to be harmed by the lack of diversity and competitiveness in their product line. I’ve said for years that they need the Polo, a competitive small crossover/SUV, a competitive large crossover/SUV, the Amarok small pickup, and a larger people mover. Instead, the States are fed a heavy dose indistinguishable sedans (Passat & CC), a small expensive Eos convertible, and a redone Beetle. While they may be decent cars, they do little for real sales numbers.

    • 0 avatar
      notwhoithink

      Agreed. Look at everything they sell: http://en.volkswagen.com/en/models.html

      And in the US we get maybe a third of that.

      • 0 avatar
        hubcap

        It is strange how few models we get. Here’s what VW sells in Oz…

        http://volkswagenaustralia.com.au/exploretherange/all

        … take a look and remember the Australian market is about one tenth the size of the U.S. market.

  • avatar
    slap

    As I understand it, VW was throwing alot of cash to get sales. Did they stop or cut back on the cash, or did they just run out of all of the people who could be bribed to buy?

    With the Sportwagen, they sold quite a few TDI manuals and had the manual for all trim levels. But with the TSI, they only have the lowest trim level with a manual.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      This is true. On the TSI, you get a manual only on the base S trim, and it’s a 5-speed at that. With the TDI, you could get a 6-speed manual all the way up to the loaded SEL trim. Mine is an SEL with the Lighting Package, but I have the DSG.

    • 0 avatar
      notwhoithink

      They were throwing around money like a drunken sailor, yes. They had insane loyalty bonuses in November, and dealers were further discounting stock. After that they slowly rolled back the bonuses, and now it’s mostly “conquest cash”. I assume they decided that any current owner who was interested would have bought in November and now they need to solely focus on getting new people into the fold?

      I never understood that, though. Why would you make the “conquest cash” bonus bigger than the “loyalty bonus”. You’re basically telling your current owners that it pays better to NOT be loyal.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        Well, that, and VW really doesn’t offer anything that would convince a lot of people to switch brands, or even to consider them over other brands. Hyundai and Kia have more/better features and a much longer warranty. Honda offers superior longevity. Ford has more-exciting styling in many cases (the Passat is downright anodyne) and also more features. VW’s best bet is relying on people like me, who’ve bought two or three of their products.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          I think their best strategy would be to get buyers’ butts in the seat for a test drive, because VWs (and the Golf in particular) make their strongest case for themselves on the road.

          A Golf feels like a frickin’ Benz if you drive it back to back with a Corolla.

    • 0 avatar
      KevinC

      My girl has a ’15 Golf TDI. The car is now somewhat of a unicorn, seeing as this is the only MQB-platform Golf (in the USA anyways) that got the TDI before it got killed off. She finally got the $1000 “assistance package” once I signed her up for it. Today she went in for an oil change and activated it. She sent me the following text from the dealership: “VW kit now activated. They don’t sell any “my VW is dirty and the environment can kiss my ass” decals in the parts department, unfortunately.” Her car is an SE, manual, lighting package car, a somewhat unusual combo that she had to wait quite a while for at the beginning of the ’15 model year. She LOVES that thing (and the ’09 Jetta TDI w/DSG that proceeded it) and has no plans to give it up. Wisely bought an extended warranty (at a steep discount too) as she was sure she’d be keeping it for the long haul. Smart girl.

  • avatar
    natrat

    cry me a river. All those countless obviously paid for glowing reviews in some online and print media combined with the deisil frauld make me think the company is full of shit top to bottom.I guess that’s the modern way.

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    I blame enthusiasts.

    Enthusiasts, real driving enthusiasts, seem to seduce a brand into providing too much stuff that normal people don’t want and slighting the segments they do.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      I think it’s the other way around. Many of the doo dads aren’t what driving enthusiasts particularly want but the manufacturers think the public at large does.

      It’s also a way for manufacturers to differentiate their product and entice defectors from competing brands.

      The next Odyssey will probably have a toaster and if you didn’t know there was talk about putting a panini maker in the latest X6.

  • avatar
    zerofoo

    You know what moves metal? $0 down, sub $200 a month leases.

    That’s the only way to “own” a VW – lease it, stay under your milage allowance, and then just hand it back when you are done.

    You would have to be nuts to keep these things out of warranty.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      “You know what moves metal? $0 down, sub $200 a month leases.”

      Exactly right. And many sales people buy into that.

      ” lease it, stay under your milage allowance”

      Even if you go over your mileage allowance and have to pay the extra-miles charges like many sales people do, it is still cheaper to go the leasing route, especially if you can write it off as a business expense.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I am going to be in the market for a CUV and I am kind of liking the next Tiguan, but I don’t know how problematic it will be or if VW will even exist by then. New Sportage (aka Korean Cayenne… Koyenne?) is in a strong 2nd though, maybe even 1st.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    Well if VW wants more sales hurry up on those buybacks and your sales will go up. Simple as that, really they have very few cars that folks want and really no CUV/ Suv that are well priced and well received. Most of the TDI owners are waiting to see what VW does for them and VW does not really do great leases.

  • avatar
    TOTitan

    Part of the problem is that they cant make enough of the cars that people want. For example, try finding a 16 Golf sportwagen SE tsi with the light pkg. There are very few out there. I got mine at the end of Sept while everybody was still scratching their heads over dieselgate, but I still had to dive over 100 miles to get it.

  • avatar
    jonnyanalog

    no numbers on the GTi? Might be some good leverage!

  • avatar
    ffighter69

    They sound so surprised over an overrated product.

  • avatar
    Whatnext

    I dunno, I read this and see that VWOA’s sales haven’t declined by the amount you would expect given they have no diesels to sell. Doesn’t seem that bad to me.

  • avatar
    Mojo_Mike

    I was in a dealership in Lewisville, Texas this week trying to work out a deal on a GTI S DSG w/Lighting Package. Looks like most dealers in the Dallas/Fort Worth area were advertising $3,000 – $3,500 off of MSRP. This dealership would go $3k off MSRP, but then hung tough on $843 in dealer “packs” (nitrogen w/lifetime fill – $149 SERIOUSLY). Would really like to have the GTI, but it is a buyer’s market and holding out for the “packs” really left a bad taste in my mouth.


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