By on November 28, 2014

2015 Subaru WRX STiThrough the first ten months of 2014, Subaru has sold 19,969 copies of their Impreza-based WRX and STi, 996 more than the number of Toyobaru sports cars sold in America this year.

WRX/STi sales are up 35% through the end of October 2014, a 140% increase compared with the full 2010 calendar year, 45% compared with all of 2011, 47% compared with 2012, and 11% compared with all of 2013.

2014, as you know, is not over yet. Subaru USA has been selling just under 2000 WRXs and STis per month.

Year-over-year volume has increased in 24 consecutive months. Nearly three out of every ten Imprezas sold is either a WRX or an STi.

The sports car market may be drying up, but it’s not dead yet. Scion, with 12,293 FR-S sales this year, and Subaru, with 6680 BRZ sales, have combined for 18,973 sales in 2014. Yes, that’s down 18% from the 23,126 sold in the first ten months of 2013. True, monthly BRZ volume peaked 20 months ago in March 2013. And no, FR-S sales haven’t topped 2000 units since the car’s first full month on sale, June 2012, and monthly FR-S volume has twice fallen into three-digits this year. Sports cars tend to do this. They surge with early interest and quickly decline with age.

But ignoring the standards set by Detroit muscle – 182,196 Camaro, Mustang, and Challenger sales this year – these are relatively popular cars, given the category in which they compete. Two-doors which sell more often than the FR-S aren’t nonexistent (Audi A5, Mini Cooper Hardtop, the three-door Hyundai Veloster, Volkswagen’s Beetle, the Chevrolet Corvette, Fiat 500, and the aforementioned trio), nor are they direct rivals for the Toyobaru twins.

Other places for sport compact-like money? Unfortunately, automakers don’t routinely release specific sales figures for models like the Civic Si, Focus and Fiesta ST, or Abarth 500s. Sales of the outgoing Mazda MX-5 Miata are down 20% to 4143 in 2014. The Volkswagen Golf GTI, however, is up 23% to 13,848 U.S. sales year-to-date.

Yet unlike the Impreza’s increasingly popular sporting iterations, the GTI isn’t outselling the combined Scion/Subaru pairing. The WRX/STi has done that in five of the last seven months; in seven of the last ten.

In 2013, the FR-S and BRZ combined for 26,914 year-end sales while the WRX/STi duo managed 17,969. In 2014, the coin has been flipped to reveal a very different side.

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures.

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86 Comments on “Subaru’s WRX/STi Is Outselling The BRZ and FR-S Twins Combined...”


  • avatar
    Scott_314

    WRX is practical enough that the wife can be convinced. Others not so much.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      That’s pretty much it. The BRZ/FRS isn’t luxurious (or at least branded) well enough to attract the second-car/toy crowd, and it’s not practical enough to be a single car for Scion/Subaru buyers.

      This isn’t a “wife” thing; even if you have no marital restrictions, it’s hard for someone who makes normal money to justify a car that might not do what they need in a pinch.

      Now, a four-door sports-sedan version of the BRZ/FRS, that would be a nice treat indeed for people who otherwise get their thrills from used E46s.

    • 0 avatar
      racer-esq.

      The two American coupes and one Italian coupe mentioned in the article above are no more practical than a BRZ/FR-S (in many ways less practical, e.g. gas mileage and parking), yet absolutely crush not just the sales of the BRZ/FR-S but also of the WRZ and other arguably more practical sporty sedans and hatchbacks.

      By the way, what kind of cuckolds need permission from their wives to buy ~20K four seat Toyotas?

      • 0 avatar
        psarhjinian

        “By the way, what kind of cuckolds need permission from their wives to buy ~20K four seat Toyotas?”

        If you’re just getting going, careeer-wise, large capital purchases are very much a joint decision.

        The FRS/BRZ are pointed at a demographic that has little, no or negative equity, won’t have any cash for a while, and when they have a bit they’ll have all sorts of competing obligations anyway.

        The Mustang et al, by comparison, are more often bought by people in their prime earning years.

      • 0 avatar
        Scott_314

        Racer-esq, you sound like a sleazy dealer “are you the man of the house or do you need permission to buy this car??”. Funny!

      • 0 avatar
        JD23

        I would argue that anyone who would spend $25k on a toy without consulting his spouse is either wealthy or headed for divorce.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          The balance of power in some relationships is different than others. I make large purchase and investment decisions for our family on my own all the time. My wife doesn’t view it as an affront because she recognizes my capability to deliver in this area.

          Just like I don’t object to the decisions she makes in her areas of responsibility. Call me sexist, chauvinist or whatever you want, it works for us.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I have to agree with Psarhjinian, in this case its probably not a horrible idea to at least bring up the idea. I’m still going to do what I want regardless but a good wife can at least help me play devil’s advocate over a major decision.

    • 0 avatar
      Redshift

      I went one better. We bought the WRX as my wife’s car.
      (With her shopping criteria of AWD, 5 door, manual trans and Turbo it was a short shopping list.)

    • 0 avatar

      I brought up the subject with wife on the way back from shopping today. We saw Saturn Sky on the road and I said that I was thinking about a GT86. She sounded enthusiastic. But what am I supposed to do about my current 2-door (the Wrangler)? I use it a few times a season. Tomorrow we’re going to take it to cut a Christmas tree.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      Was thinking the same. The STI is a fairly direct competitor, as in, generally bought for it’s dynamics. In BMW parlance, the STI is the M3, hence kinda-sorta a competitor to the Cayman. The WRX is a 335 with a sport package to the plain Impreza’s 328.

      Comparing sales of a car with as narrow a focus as the 86 to the latter, is a bit disingenuous. I’m actually very pleasantly surprised that there is as much of a market in the US for the 86s as there obviously is. Good on Toyobaru for keeping the dream (of a lightweight drivers car) alive amidst article after article about how CUVs are taking over, and how the fastest growing nameplates are all of the 4000lb, $90,000 gilded geezer coffin kind.

  • avatar
    heavy handle

    The sports car isn’t dead, it’s the 1960s concept of the sports car that’s due for retirement (along with the Boomers who popularized it).

    The two-door two-seater (or 2+2 if your passengers don’t have legs) stopped being a mainstream category in the 80s when young people realized that they could have more fun for less money with a GTI. Ever since, any “traditional sports car” has been sold exclusively to the old-guy market.

    Long story short: the WRX is a sports car. Today’s buyers didn’t grow up lusting after MGAs, they watched the Fast and Furious.

    • 0 avatar
      cronus

      Sports cars sold poorly in the 60’s as well, it’s just that they generate a disproportionate number of magazine articles making it seem like they are more popular then they actually are.

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      The sports car isn’t dead, but it’s not in the exclusive realm of the “old-guy” market. These three cars are perfect examples of that. I’d guess the average buyer of an STI is 30-40 and for the BRZ/FR-S around low 30’s.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Actually, that was the ’40s-’50s-early ’60s sports car concept that ended with the MGA and TR3. The mid-’60s mustang convertible mortally wounded it and created the muscle car era, but the Brits kept cranking out MGs and TRs for awhile, as the tweedy two seater mystique slowly expired.

      • 0 avatar
        petezeiss

        The cultural plume laid down by the Brits extended far enough to enhance my adolescence and early adulthood. I loved every sensory tidbit indulged in by owning a TR-4 and by crawling all over and riding in it when it was my older brother’s.

        The “the tweedy two seater mystique” is something from an entirely different world and era that I doubt anyone born after 1965 could fully grasp. You would need to have come of age in an America that still had a vestigial admiration for English urbanity, wit and their gift for irony-laden understatement.

        Combine that with the James Bond craze to attract young boys and you have a gateway to appreciating the people and things of the greatest empire to precede ours. Classic sports cars were part of that and, yes, muscle cars destroyed them in the States like helicopter chain guns on tribal riflemen.

        Besides, until the ’70s and except for steering wheels and some knobs, there was No Plastic Anywhere in their cockpits. Wood, Leather and enameled metal make, I think, deeper and more intimate impressions than do the plethora of engineering resins that are today’s interface with whatever passes as “sports cars”.

      • 0 avatar
        petezeiss

        The cultural plume laid down by the Brits extended far enough to enhance my adolescence and early adulthood. I loved every sensory tidbit indulged in by owning a TR-4 and by crawling all over and riding in it when it was my older brother’s.

        The “tweedy two seater mystique” is something from an entirely different world and era that I doubt anyone born after 1965 could fully grasp. You would need to have come of age in an America that still had a vestigial admiration for English urbanity, wit and their gift for irony-laden understatement.

        Combine that with the James Bond craze to attract young boys and you have a gateway to appreciating the people and things of the greatest empire to precede ours. Classic sports cars were part of that and, yes, muscle cars destroyed them in the States like helicopter chain guns on tribal riflemen.

        Bes*des, until the ’70s and except for steering wheels and some knobs, there was No Plastic Anywhere in their cockpits. Wood, Leather and enameled metal make, I think, deeper and more intimate impressions than do the plethora of engineering resins that are today’s interface with whatever passes as “sports cars”.

  • avatar
    Viceroy_Fizzlebottom

    This shouldn’t be all that surprising. They’re fun cars that can actually fit full grown American adults in the back seat.

  • avatar
    raresleeper

    Sweet, sweet STI. Got me blushing like a schoolgirl.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    FRS and BRZ are much too expensive for what you get, it’s a two liter engine in a supposed sports car and you expect to have decent sales with a starting price over 20k?
    Either put in a lightweight V6 that doesn’t throw the balance off, or drop the starting price to 18k.

    The WRX can actually go out and have fun in the real world, since not everyone lives within driving distance of any good curvy roads.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      “FRS and BRZ are much too expensive for what you get”

      The Miata is the primary competition; it’s not too expensive given that. The issue is that the Miata doesn’t sell that well, either.

      It could use two more doors (and a wheelbase stretch) and/or a price cut. The price cut won’t help it much because insurance would eat up the difference for the target audience, but two more doors would get it out the door.

      Then it could be the Altezza RS200 that I wished we got here.

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      starting price in the $20k range is a great value for a spots car. A car doesn’t need a big engine or high horsepower to be a sports car and it certainly doesn’t need that to be fun to drive. Look at the Miata, they’ve leveraged that concept for years and although it isn’t my style, it’s a great car and a great performer. Certainly no reason at all you couldn’t enjoy a FR-S/BRZ on a good curvy road.

      • 0 avatar

        You can put the top down, get leather, and decent interior on a Miata.

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          But you can’t get a real solid roof on one. Nor fit in one if you’re above average height (or girth)

        • 0 avatar
          duffman13

          Piggybacking on that-

          The only things you get in a 27k FRS that you don’t in a 27k Miata are Bluetooth and navigation.

          Otherwise the Miata has a drop-top and is just as fast. Bump it up from club to grand touring ($500) and you get leather, heated seats and add Bluetooth.

          Unless you don’t fit in a Miata, have image issues that won’t let you drive one, or really want a coupe, the FR-S doesn’t provide much incentive to buy it over the Mazda.

          Hell, the BRZ Limited is a much better price proposition than the FR-S for content and features.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      Measured in $s per any reasonable metric for driver feedback, they’re the cheapest mass produced cars on the planet, possibly excepting the Miata.

      They’re also, again along with the Miata, priced so that quite a few guys young enough to appreciate them, can afford to both buy and run them.

      Guys old enough their ever expanding stomachs require the acceleration of a blown V8 to remain regular, may not appreciate them, but I bet that only adds to the alure amongst those who do.

  • avatar
    frozenman

    Could it be they sell better because wrx/sti is faster, handles well, and is fun to drive in bad weather? Just wait and see what happens when they finally offer a hatch. Turbo version of the Crosstreck would be a killer IMHO.

    • 0 avatar
      kosmo

      Amen to the hatch comment. WRX sales would surge another 50%.

      I’ve owned a really fun 2-door sports car. The problem was that it just sat too much. In so many cases, it just wasn’t practical enough for the journey at hand.

      • 0 avatar

        Seems like they’re having no problem getting rid of all the sedans on the lots, and long wait times still exist on ordered cars. Where does the extra capacity come from to make a hatch, that would increase their sales 50%?

        • 0 avatar
          Redshift

          Extra capacity?
          Drop FRS/BRZ
          Convert capacity to WRX 5 door
          Profit

          The WRX is a higher unit revenue product, and, being built on a shared (Impreza) platform rather than a unique one, I’m guessing it’s a more profitable product as well.
          Based on current sales trends, FRS/BRZ volumes will probably be close to potential WRX 5 door volume soon enough.

  • avatar

    Any idea how sales of the FRS/BRZ compare in Canada? I’m in the Greater Vancouver area, and these are just about everywhere here. They are really popular. In comparison, I see a lot fewer WRX/STIs.

    • 0 avatar

      “Any idea how sales of the FRS/BRZ compare in Canada?”

      Under 2300 for the first 10 months.

      “I’m in the Greater Vancouver area, and these are just about everywhere here.”

      Do you regularly drive through a Scion dealer lot? That could explain why they are just about everywhere.

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      FR-S: http://www.goodcarbadcar.net/2012/05/scion-fr-s-sales-figures.html
      BRZ: http://www.goodcarbadcar.net/2012/05/subaru-brz-sales-figures.html

      But unfortunately, there’s no reliable soirce for WRX/STi figures in Canada, they’re just thrown in with the Impreza.

  • avatar
    jdash1972

    I suppose the WRX must look like a much better proposition on with its greater power and utility. I have driven the FRS and I wanted it badly, the price looked like a bargain. It is a real sports car and what you get is just as significant as what is excluded, in my humble opinion.

    • 0 avatar
      frozenman

      You are probably right but the HP/torque deficiency does not make the twins a compelling choice, the motor is a holding the car back, price point be damned.

      • 0 avatar
        jdash1972

        I don’t disagree. But I would trade the power of the WRX for the balance and stripped down uncompromising simplicity of the FRS. It’s the one I’d rather have on a winding road, even if that happens only rarely. It’s also reasonably quick when you rev the engine, numbers never tell the complete story. I don’t want a car that’s a compromise. I don’t want a sports car that’s also a sedan and a station wagon and can haul lumber from Home Depot, even if that’s what I really need on a regular basis. I own a ’94 Miata, which has zero practicality and is not terribly powerful, but I still enjoy driving it. I bought it new off a dealer lot in 1994 and I still love driving it. It’s also my second car.

        • 0 avatar
          BigPapa

          Right so someone like you would not even consider the WRX because it has 2 doors too many and is indeed a compromise. I think it’s fair to say that significantly more new car (not SUV/CUV/truck) buyers would opt for a practical sedan than a sporty coupe. Given the fact that the WRX is positioned so uniquely in the market with its reasonable price and the ability do just about everything.

      • 0 avatar

        Just wondering, is that a bench comparison or is your opinion based on a test drive?

        • 0 avatar
          jdash1972

          I test drove an FRS with a manual (of course). I would rate the steering almost as good as my Miata, but the car is a thousand times more livable. Good shifting as well, less notchy than the Miata. It’s rear wheel drive – you’re not going to get that driving experience with an all or front wheel drive car. I’ve driven a Mustang, a Camero and a Challenger too and please… they are no fun at all to drive. They are boats by comparison.

        • 0 avatar
          jdash1972

          I have not driven a WRX however, so I can’t say that it’s any less fun to drive. It doesn’t look very appealing to me but I can’t judge it.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          Having driven the Scion, I found it quite disappointing. It manages to be boring. What is needs is an engine that is actually interested in having fun. The Scion with my Abarth’s turbo 1.4 would be a hoot and a half, even though it would be slower. Character makes up for speed.

      • 0 avatar
        NeilM

        frozenman writes: “You are probably right but the HP/torque deficiency does not make the twins a compelling choice, the motor is a holding the car back, price point be damned.”

        Dindingding! We have a winnah!

        The FRS/BRZ are nice enough, but they’re gutless. And unlike a Miata, they don’t have the allure of bugs-in-your-teeth motoring to offset that. Making the lack of power even harder to ignore, we all know that Suburu has a shelf full of turbo engines that could do the job that’s needed.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          They aren’t really gutless, they are, by the numbers, plenty fast. The trouble is the engine just is not interested in playing. A truly fantastic package completely let down by an engine that would really prefer to be in some boring midsize sedan, bolted to an automatic, upshifting early and often. A rev-happy little turbo would completely transform this car. As I said before, something like this with the Abarths snarling little mill would be fantastic, even if it was no faster than currently. It needs to FEEL faster, not BE faster.

          • 0 avatar
            stuki

            I’m of the opposite opinion. The whole point of the FR-S/BRZ is to be organic, linear, matter-of-fact and non synthetic. Stuffing some laggy turbo mill in there would simply reduce it to parity with any other commonly available hopped up econobox, as I see it.

            I do kind of wish it revved a bit faster, though, although having an engine that almost mandates a “slow hands” approach does fit well with the car’s overall mojo.

  • avatar

    I don’t know how serious either Toyota or Subaru are about selling the car. When was the last time you saw any advertising, even in enthusiast venues, for the FR-S or BRZ?

    That’s a shame because I got more positive comments during the week that I had an FR-S than I got with the Audi A6, SQ5, and A3 combined. People, particular males in the 18-35 cohort, notice it and like its looks.

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      Because that’s how Toyota markets their cars. Similar to most manufacturers. Heavy push upon release and then move on to a different car. Toyota won’t do any more advertising until there is a refresh or a new model.

  • avatar
    BigPapa

    This isn’t a surprise. Firstly, all of the cars listed in the article are 2-wheel drive except the A5, but the A5 is in a whole different league and therefore market than the 2015 WRX/STI. People want AWD perhaps for reasons that they shouldn’t. As consumers we’ve been banged over the head too many times with AWD marketing and advertising to a point that we actually think that we cannot take on any bit of weather without it. Sure, AWD is better for off-roading or taking on unpaved roads, but honestly who the hell is off-roading with a sports sedan? Have you seen the ground clearance on these things?

    When it comes down to it, the WRX offers sportiness with minimal/no compromise. AWD? check. spacious and practical? check. small fuel-efficient engine? check.manual transmission option? check (and a 6-speed now). Alleged Japanese reliability? check. Won’t break the bank? check.

    The new WRX is basically in a league of its own. I can see no car that compares to it in terms of practicality, sportiness, and price. Anyone in the market for a reasonably priced and practical sedan with any semblance of sportiness on their list would look at the WRX.

  • avatar

    When I was at the 2014 Autoshow, I turned around and saw a tallish, lumpy vehicle on a pedestal. “Oh no, Subaru made a down-market Crosstour competitor!” I thought. Then I saw it was the new WRX. It looks like a rumpled pillow. It’s a real problem when the Corolla is sportier than the Impreza. Or maybe not, if they are selling. Don’t listen to me, I liked the frog-eyed one from the turn of the century.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    The traditional sports car provided a nimble (by the standards of the day) alternative to four-door behemoths that had steering wheels strictly for decorative purposes.

    Since then, the Germans invented the sports sedan, bringing sports car characteristics to a more practical package, an idea that caught on with the rest of the market. Now that the sports car offers no unique benefits, it’s the disadvantages that determine its popularity.

  • avatar
    stanczyk

    Is it a surprice ?

    Yes , 4-door sedan is more practical , but it’s not hard to gues that, if Toyobarus would get an engine from WRX that would help .. for sure :)

    Almost all peple say that thse cars are underpowered and too slow .. and Toyota is doing nothing ..
    First they need to differentiate this cars: design(they should look diferently! – you can cut costs but.. to save on body panels this way ?!?, and they need ‘stronger-engine options\'(i.e Toyota Supercharger, Subaru – Turbo ..) ..

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      There’s no need to build significant output increases into these cars. The FR-S/BRZ are an entry level car and many seem to forget that you don’t need HP to make a car fun.

      There is no surprise at all on these sales figures. The WRX is new and a sales bump was expected. It’s a different market.

      • 0 avatar
        WholeyOne

        I agree…no one at my store that’s bought a 2015 STI or WRX has cross-shopped it with BRZ…no one. When I tell them the wait for a new one is 3-6 months, I try to tell them I can get them into a BRZ immediately (500 dollar flats in these babies b/c no one wants them!) and the reaction is always “oh hell no, I’ll wait.”

  • avatar
    akatsuki

    All I care about is how the FR-S matches projections by Toyota. Did they meet them? If so, great the sports car is still viable. If not, then this grand experiment is over.

    I personally would rather have seen the Altezza come over but lexus already gets a lot of grief for badge engineering. A four door would be great and I’d seriously consider a convertible.

  • avatar
    dougjp

    Ultimately power & torque is everything, no matter what governments and car makers say. This is especially true with sports cars, and they made a mistake not having an optional turbo engine for these cars. Hence only part of the market is satisfied (the ‘its better to drive a slow car fast’ crowd), and sales take the hit.

  • avatar
    nickoo

    I don’t see a reason to buy the FRS compared to a base mustang or mustang ecoboost. With the WRX, you are truly buying something unique, as there really is nothing else like it out there. It’s just too bad they went to a CVT and dropped the hatch.

    • 0 avatar

      They still offer the 6-speed manual in both WRX and STI. No reason to get the CVT if you don’t want to. I’m not missing the hatch, the trunk is pretty big on the sedan.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Even the new Mustang is a boat. One of the most disappointing test drives I have ever had. I was really excited about the new Ecoboost Mustang, but it felt like just as much of a boat as the old one, though it certainly does do broken pavement better..

  • avatar
    jdash1972

    There is no comparison between a Mustang and an FRS. Totally different cars, the FRS is actually fun to drive.

  • avatar
    EAF

    Gearbox failures, leaky headgaskets, oil consumption, piston slap, spun rod bearings … These were some of the terms synonymous with Subaru. Have things changed for 2015? For the price of the STI I would go for the Evo!

  • avatar
    Mike N.

    It’s partly because Americans buy horsepower but buy torque. There are certainly many who appreciate a high revving engine relatively low torque engine, but for most people it feels gutless.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Most people can’t find full throttle and/or the redline with a GPS. They *need* 300hp because they are only actually willing to use about 1/2 of it.

      • 0 avatar
        petezeiss

        Gotdamm.. full throttle?! You’ll break something!

        Except for stomping a downshift in an AT, I don’t think I’ve ever held the pedal down more than half-way. *shudder* So WRONG.

  • avatar

    Is it even worth copy/pasting the five or six core reasons why the FR-S was destined to fail as anything one a one-generation wonder from the get-go?

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I have a sports car now. Pretty much set on trading it for a Fiesta ST/GTI. Sports cars face a few insurmountable challenges.

    – average cars are getting quick, and sports cars have to sacrifice a LOT to stay ahead dynamically and objectively while remaining affordable

    – people are tapped for cash and can’t afford the weekly track days necessary to really enjoy a true, full on sports car

    – like that BMW dude said sports cars are no longer status symbols. It’s pretty much anti-sports cars- luxury EVs and crossovers. Which further limits the sports car’s appeal to purists who probably don’t have the money to buy one new (see the slow death of the Viper)

    Literally everything better about the FRS/BRZ is subjective/academic. Lower center of gravity? So? Uncorrupted steering feel? And? <2800lb curb weight? That's nice? For the average Joe, who spends most of his miles commuting, probably doesnt live on a mountain, and has friends, the WRX/STI's advantages are real and practical. And it can still make him smile. It's not the late 90s anymore, where the average car SUUUUUUCCCCCCKKKKKEEDDDD and all the non-German/American sports cars were dying. Pretty much every performance car out for less than $35K is awesome. Unless your lifestyle affords you the means to really enjoy a sports car in the way it should be, it doesn't really make sense.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      I think someone earlier in this thread put it quite well – hot hatches are sports cars too. My Abarth is just as much a sports car as an FR-S, and a whole lot more entertaining despite being nominally less capable. Same for the two Ford STs. The GTI is much more polished and thus a bit less fun, but is such an amazing all-arounder that it is certainly the best bet as an only car. I really, really wanted to like the FR-S, but it just left me stone cold (as did the EB Mustang, sadly). I’m in the target demographic for the car, but it is just not enough fun.

      I have respect for the WRX, but I would never buy one, too crude and boy-racer compared to a GTI, and I have zero use for AWD in a car. Plus no hatch = no sale to me anyway.

      • 0 avatar
        hubcap

        “I have respect for the WRX, but I would never buy one, too crude and boy-racer…”

        The new gen is a nice car. Nothing boy racer about a WRX (the wing on the STI, yeah, I’ll give you that). The WRX is a Q-ship with a much better interior to include solid feeling switch gear. Take one out for a spin. You may be surprised.

  • avatar
    EAF

    SportyAccord .. Check out the ST forums .. Owners are experiencing overheating issues, output shaft bearing issues, Sony Mytouch issues as well. Shame because the Fiesta ST is a blast. Can’t speak on the GTI I stay far away from all VW products. What’s your present sports car?

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      I have a 350Z. Big problem is gas mileage- 20 MPG and ~25,000 miles a year. So the obvious move (G35) is no good. Plus in any case I am kind of bored with the VQ35. It’s fast, but I wouldn’t mind some more low end oomph. GTI/ST can make more low end torque per lb and weigh less. And get ~28 MPG combined. My wife has had an MKV Rabbit for 2 years and it has been problem free so I’m warming up to the idea.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    I certainly see a hell of a lot more WRXes here. Hell, the tuner crowd is more into WRXes and Volkswagens here than Hondas.

  • avatar
    Cabriolet

    A good buddy of mine that i used to run with before his hip went purchased a STI a few years ago. Car was very crude but fast. Rode hard but went like hell. After having the car for few years he got tired of the poor interior and bad gas mileage and then the small problems started. Head gasket leaking, drive shafts, oil leaks etc and he traded the car in for Subaru outback. He is much happier with the better gas mileage and his back thanks him for the better ride. Only thing he dislikes is the CVT transmission “To much noise”. I solved my problem by buying a VW GTI with a automatic DSG and i love the car. Wonderful interior, good handling and my back is happy and did i mention lots of power. As long as i keep my foot out of the turbo i get about 34-36 MPG on the open road. City i adverage approx 26-28 MPG. Im happy. I also own a nice Miata that i drive when i want a real sport car. Small 1.6 engine, 5 speed and with the top down the most fun that you can have legally. I am 78 years old and will drive these two cars until i can’t drive any more.

  • avatar
    superchan7

    The mainstream-isation of the sporty practical car has pushed the pure sports car into a niche. It’s amazing how capable cars like the WRX and the 3 series are–as many said, up until the 1990s most cars performed like utter crap; sports cars were necessary for even a hint of speed.

    Now people have so many choices for affordable fun. Abarth 500s are a riot and can be had for blowout prices. Coopers always get rave reviews. The Civic Si has good power and is super refined. You can have your cake and eat it, too.

    So, a dedicated platform for a 2-seater? Take those babies upmarket.

  • avatar
    Tommy231

    Put the WRX powertrain, or even just it’s turbocharged engine into the BRZ/FR-S and watch what happens to BRZ/FR-S sales.

  • avatar
    petezeiss

    Rejoice! Sports cars are not dead! From Boston.com:

    “New Hampshire State Police arrested a teen driving at a speed of 127 mph around 9:30 a.m. Saturday. The Special Enforcement Unit, which monitors aggressive driving behaviors from the air during high traffic and holiday periods, spotted the SUBARU SEDAN traveling northbound on Interstate 93 at an extremely high velocity.”

    Twerps Choose Subaru!
    Shouldn’t You?

  • avatar
    Fordson

    Pulling up to a bar in anything with that spoiler on the back is a sure way to get carded at the door.

    Actually, I think Subaru is saving money building these cars and marketing them the way they do – “this new WRX is WAY more refined than the old one!”

    Way more refined than the mid-90s Civics that prospective WRX owners have been driving up until now, which is their frame of reference.


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