By on July 5, 2014

2014-Jeep-Grand-Cherokee-EcoDiesel-4

To most North American consumers, diesel is an exotic powertrain option, full of promise when it comes to torque and efficiency. It rarely delivers on the promise.

Based on our impressions of the Ram 1500 EcoDiesel, the same 3.0L V6 fitted to the Jeep Grand Cherokee seemed to be extremely promising – especially now that gas prices have spiked to record highs. But something was lost in the transition from truck to SUV.

The most jarring difference is the lack of smoothness that won us over in the Ram. The same engine that is nearly silent and effortlessly smooth in the Ram seems to have a much more audible, agricultural note, with inferior NVH characteristics. Somehow, the leisure-oriented SUV ends up feeling more like the work vehicle.

Diesel die-hards may shrug this off as panty-waist behavior from someone not used to compression ignition engines, but convincing customers to spend the extra $4,500 is going to be a tough sell for anyone who didn’t buy a diesel Grand Cherokee last time around. Especially when they hit the remote start only to be greeted with a school-bus soundtrack on cold starts.

That’s not to say that there are only drawbacks with the diesel. There is prodigious torque on tap (420 lb-ft, and 240 horsepower), and all that power is a great match for the silky smooth 8-speed ZF gearbox. Even compared to the 5.7L Hemi, passing is effortless at speed, while highway cruising tends to downplay the drivetrain noise. Only the woosh of the turbo is heard when you summon the prodigious twist of the VM Motori V6.

The rest of the car, like all Grand Cherokees, is superb. The steering has more feel than many passenger cars, while the air suspension gives superb ride characteristics on any road. I am on record as being UConnect’s biggest fan, and I can think of no better car to cover long distances in. Except for a gasoline powered Grand Cherokee.

Even though the EcoDiesel returned about 27 mpg (and that’s cruising at 75 mph with the A/C on – the EPA rates it at 28 mpg highway), I would find it hard to justify buying anything beyond the Pentastar V6/8-speed combo, similar to what Jack’s father bought.

If you are doing serious towing, or covering enough miles to justify the added cost of the diesel engine (and the higher resale value of the diesel should also help), then perhaps it makes sense. For myself, and many other consumers, the V6, V8 – hell, even the SRT – models will make more sense, given how quickly the higher trim level Summit models with the EcoDiesel can breach the $60k barrier.

As far as I’m concerned, the Grand Cherokee is still the best SUV on sale at any price. It has just the right mix of luxury, performance and discretion to be appropriate in any environment. The driving experience is more in line with premium European offerings than anything built by America or Japan. And given all this, I had high hopes for the diesel, and it did deliver on the promise of V8-like power with much better fuel economy. But I’m not sure it’s the all-purpose solution that many people were expecting. For me, that would be a nicely equipped Laredo with the gasoline V6.

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73 Comments on “Capsule Review: Jeep Grand Cherokee EcoDiesel...”


  • avatar
    highdesertcat

    Amen to the ” a much more audible, agricultural note, with inferior NVH characteristics”.

    Heard a guy pull up to park in the Wal-Mart parking lot. What a racket!

    Not appropriate for such an expensive luxury vehicle.

    I’ll take the quiet and smooth Pentastar V6 in our 2012 JGC any day over that nasty and expensive little diesel mill.

    IMO, if you do some serious towing, there’s no substitute for the 5.7 V8 with the tow package, 230mm rear axle and Selectrac II drive train.

  • avatar
    HerrKaLeun

    “Even though the EcoDiesel returned about 27 mpg (and that’s cruising at 75 mph with the A/C on ”

    How does that compare to the gasoline version? unless the gasoline version is really bad, and accounting for diesel fuel more expensive, this seems more expensive to drive than a gasoline version?

    and how much more and more expensive service needs to be done? Does it require the same “we charge you like it is liquid gold” oil as the VW diesel? If that is the case, any fuel savings will disappear in added maintenance.

    More information needed to make economic statement on diesel.

    • 0 avatar
      Dan Roth

      I just drove a JGC Summit EcoDiesel for a week. Got the same economy as Derek did, roughly.

      I *own* a 2013 JGC Limited w/Pentastar and 5spdauto. The diesel returns 10 mpg+ better economy. The V6 is givi g me abt 19 mpg mixed, which would rise to 23 hwy only.

      The air ride of the Summit was great, so was the ZF 8spd, which is different than the ofher 8 spd autos that come with the V6 or Hemi. But at 60K, there is STIFF competiton. I do ADORE the way the GC drives. I mean, I am paying my own money for one, after all.

    • 0 avatar

      Enough !

      I always hear about how diesel is more expensive. In NY, an expensive market, diesel is the price of midgrade. For reasons unknown you will find stations who peak price diesel, so I’ve seen some silly prices-you don’t have to buy it.

      Bottom line is that diesel is midgrade priced in most of my areas.

      Worst case it is premium plus ten cents, but today I bought 3.89. I could have paid 4.69 at my worst case scenario station…..Most are 4.09 to 4.19. Premium is running 4.29

      There is a payback period with diesel, but a Sportline Golf with massive torque in city traffic is not a bad place. Relentless Pull up to 100 mph also makes for rapid transit in a plain but very competent wrapper. Just don’t try to pull off a two lane “four barrel” pass ! Diesel is different, no doubt. Better depends on your requirements and mission statement.

    • 0 avatar
      joe_thousandaire

      My V6 JGC gets 21-22mpg under the same conditions.

  • avatar
    mkirk

    This will be news to the Aussie contingent…a gas motor making more sense in this sort of vehicle will be straight blasphemy to them.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @mkirk,
      Correct the Pentastar V6 is a total clunker here,not wanted by anybody. I suspect the Euro Regulations have changed the characteristics of the diesel engine, much more user friendly than in the US. The Hemi is fine as a performance engine though.

  • avatar
    Good ole dayz

    I have a 2006 Jeep Liberty CRD (diesel). I love diesel torque and longevity, and the availability of that in the CRD is what prompted me (for the first time in my adult life) to roll the dice and purchase a new UAW product.

    Alas, this vehicle’s quality has proven to me that the last several decades’ conventional wisdom that UAW products start to fall apart as soon as the warranty ends remains all too true. I won’t again make the mistake of purchasing a new UAW vehicle.

    And, it pains me to say, I don’t anticipate purchasing any new diesel either — the EPA-imposed urea injection and particulate filters have just made diesels overly-complex expensive problems just waiting to happen as the vehicle accumulates miles. Not just from UAW manufacturers, but from all manufacturers.

    The Grand Cherokee may drive like a dream when new, but between UAW manufacture (e.g., engineers told to spec lower-cost / shorter longevity / higher “mean time to failure” of components to help offset the cost of having the UAW on the premises), plus the Rube Goldberg emissions system imposed by EPA, means that it’s a recurring, expensive headache just waiting for the warranty to expire.

    I wish it weren’t so, but it is what it is.

    • 0 avatar
      Jerome10

      I can sorta agree with you here…I am not going to pin it on UAW workers….but the end result is the same. The JGC gets some pretty poor marks in both consumer reports and TrueDelta.

      I’ve known 2 people personally interested in this car, one of those people previously owning 2 Audis driven till the wheels fall off (about 180k miles) and the associated expense of that, and they simply said there was too much garbage in the quality/reliability reports to spend their cash on this car.

      I’m not expecting Chrysler to be Honda, but at some point it sure would be nice if they could make a car with minimal issues, or issues that aren’t huge headaches to the owner to get taken care of.

      I have been interested in this car as well, and I too just will not buy one with the quality issues.

      Beyond that, this goes along what I’ve always said, unless you love Diesel for Diesel’s-sake, in the USA this engine just simply doesn’t make sense. I’m glad the option is there. I own a BMW diesel now. I like it for what it is but after this, I’m done with Diesel. Gas is just better unless you’re towing or driving long highway distances frequently. And your point about complexity has me worried too…especially since Chrysler can’t seem to get some simpler stuff right.

      • 0 avatar
        thelaine

        There is absolutely no excuse for quality and reliability problems with a mainstream vehicle. It is frustrating that they can’t or are unwilling to do the basics. Toyota recalls notwithstanding, when you buy a Honda or Toyota, you are getting the best odds of a vehicle that will run longer for less, compared to every other manufacturer. Even if they are boring, or cost more, or don’t give you exactly what you want, you buy them because you don’t want to get screwed.

        The other manufactures just don’t have the same persistent commitment. Toyota’s recent stumbles have just refocused the company. Who is betting against them getting back to the top in reliability?

        GM? Chrysler? To me, they have no credibility when they talk about quality and reliability. They have too much history that is the opposite of Toyota and Honda history. As for Ford, I don’t know. Maybe.

      • 0 avatar
        billfrombuckhead

        The UAW has this magic potion that makes them fall apart just when the warranty ends! ROFL

        The Grand Cherokee is so poorly assembled that they can’t build them fast enough for world consumption.

        Consumer Reports hates the Grand Cherokee so much that their chief auto tester bought a Durango instead and got his sitter to buy one as well..

        • 0 avatar
          turboprius

          So, if the Durango is based on the Grand Cherokee, and the Grand Cherokee has bad reliability, why did Tom buy one?

          Considering CR loves the Santa Fe and Highlander, I’m surprised he didn’t get one of those two instead.

          • 0 avatar
            billfrombuckhead

            The reliability isn’t really all that bad and easily overlooked if you tow and load it up with cargo for vacation use. BTW, the Durango is now getting similar rave reviews like it’s Grand Cherokee sister car doing very well in recent comparison tests in Motor Trend and MotorWeek.

            Grand Cherokee has become one of the most popular cars for millionaires due to it’s tank like build quality and capability. Grand Cherokee is now also the top selling large SUV in Australia, right in japanInc’s and KoreaInc’s backyard. Chinese love the Grand Cherokee so much they pay they pay extraordinary tariffs to buy them. Even Californians have made Chrysler the fastest growing car company in their state with Jeep leading the way.

            Your UAW bashing shows your Jeep hatred is ideological and not logical.
            Mopar Uber Alles

          • 0 avatar
            30-mile fetch

            “…ideological and not logical”

            Followed immediately by “Mopar Uber Alles”

            Uh huh. How does your skull not explode from the cognitive dissonance?

            By the way, since you’re now very concerned with being “logical”, you should note that none of the arguments you made in this post or the prior had anything to do with long-term durability, which was the essence of thelaine’s comment to which you were replying.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Billfrombuckethead.
            No the Grand Cherokee is not the top selling, large SUV, but does sell well at least with the diesel. It was the 4th best selling large SUV in 2013, bested by the Toyota Prado,Ford Territory, Holden Captiva.It was narrowly in front of the Toyota Kluger.There are some reliability and electronic issues with the Grand Cherokee. It beats the Kluger as it is a Petrol CUV.

            Luxury class SUV’s had the Land Cruiser Wagon way in front.

      • 0 avatar
        Good ole dayz

        Just to clarify, I’m not pinning the quality issues on bad assembly (though most of us have seen the YouTubes of UAW workers getting loaded at lunch). The real problem is the expense structure that the UAW imposes — wages, work rules, featherbedding, pensions, healthcare — prompt the companies to offset those higher costs elsewhere. And since it can only somewhat come out of content (the consumer would notice too much of a differential in standard equipment), it has to come out of the other controllable expense — QUALITY.

        Specify lower quality components that have a meant time to failure not far from warranty and after the 3 year “long term” measure of JD Powers, and you can produce a product of inferior quality to the UAW-free competition, but which inferiority won’t necessarily show up on “Initial Quality” and JD Powers “Long Term” surveys.

        I submit to you that is why the UAW manufacturers can claim that now there’s only a “perception gap” while genuinely long-term reports (e.g., Consumer Reports) still show UAW vehicles with a disproportionate levels of black circles in vehicles four years of age and above.

        That’s why I spoke of not again purchasing a “UAW” vehicle instead of just Chrysler-Jeep.

        • 0 avatar
          thelaine

          +1 Good ole dayz. Exactly. Yes to all you just wrote. The only time I buy from Chrysler is when they make a vehicle, like the Jeep, that no one else makes. I cannot wait until Toyota makes something that actually competes with the Jeep. Same with 3/4 ton pickups. When that happens, forget it UAW. You just tapeworm your host company until it starves to death.

          It’s not that “US” UAW companies can’t make good vehicles. I have owned them. The problem is that it is too much of a crapshoot. You never know what you’re going to get, and when you run into issues, good luck. There are just too many problems, and I find it unacceptable in 2014. You haven’t figured out how to make a reliable fking car yet??? Reliability issues were basically solved 20 years ago, but you still churn out random crap that you have not tested properly or because you just don’t care. I am done playing craps. Just give me a Toyota. Best odds in the casino.

          As for the UAW, they care about the UAW and the UAW only. Not the company. Not the cars. Not the customers. Not the taxpayers. PLEASE don’t ask me to give a fk about them.

          Non-union auto manufactures do just fine in the US, and it has nothing to do with the wage pressure from the UAW, that is more UAW propaganda. It has everything to do with satisfied workers and cooperation rather than suspicion, pi*s-poor attitudes and confrontation.

    • 0 avatar
      HerrKaLeun

      the added complexity for diesel also exists in the EU and all other developed countries, can’t just blame the EPA. Blame children who don’t want to die.

      But you are right in that for small vehicles the diesel emission control is way too expensive and complex to make it worthwhile. It pays for a large truck (and by that I don’t mean F150 or so), ships, etc. but for cars and small SUVs rarely. Gasoline engines became so more efficient, and diesel fuel so expensive, it makes less economical sense than 20 years ago when diesels were allowed to pollute freely.

      As for UAW build vehicles. I’m totally against the UAW. But have to say my Mazda 6 (UAW built in Ford factory) is good. The only little deterioration I see is based on material choice, not assembly (the bottom rubber seal for rear windows seems to fall apart, was the same issue on my Japanese Mazda 3).

    • 0 avatar
      RedStapler

      I had the same experience with my 2006 CRD Liberty. Turbo crapped out under warranty at ~20k, and it started having big expensive repairs right out of warranty at 45k. After committing the cardinal sin of eating big $ before being paid off it was traded in on a Subaru Legacy.

      I wound up trading down to a 1999 Cherokee XJ with the I6. Its a bit smaller and worse on NVH, but it has been far more reliable as a 13-15yr old car than the KJ was at 4-5yrs.

      • 0 avatar
        Good ole dayz

        I feel your pain. Since last December my CRD has a check engine light (code turbo related) that neither the dealer or factory can figure out the cause. So far multi-thousands “invested” in the vehicle has not resolved the issue.

        I’m afraid to drive it out of town. I don’t want to now incur a car payment, but am seriously tempted to dump it and get a 4Runner.

        The problem is, trying to trade a vehicle with a constant check engine light is going to mean I’d take a four-figure bath below book value.

        So no matter what I do, I’m screwed.

        • 0 avatar
          pragmatist

          Ah the CRD, parting gift from MB. Hopefully the new one is less astronomical to maintain.

          • 0 avatar
            hybridkiller

            Perhaps this was implicit in your comment, but the JGC EcoDiesel is a VM Motori unit, not the MB motor.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @pragmatist
            No different CRD, this is a VMotori product, not a left over from Mercedes.
            They did have the Mercedes CRD in the Jeep

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Although I completely agree with your last paragraph, I disagree with this:

      “Alas, this vehicle’s quality has proven to me that the last several decades’ conventional wisdom that UAW products start to fall apart as soon as the warranty ends remains all too true.”

      I have owned, bought/sold, and wholesaled mid 90s-mid 00s domestic product in avg-well worn condition and I have not encountered a single problem which was directly due to an assembly issue. This is not to say that it cannot happen nor to say the cars never had other issues, but it is disingenuous to make blanket statements specifically on UAW assembly.

      • 0 avatar
        Drewlssix

        He made the somewhat tenuous connection between UAW wages and lower quality components rather than simply poor assembly. IMO the quality issues the big three have traditionally suffered are more directly linked to management than making up for heavy handed unions. It’s not as if non union assemblers get paid shit wages or anything. So I don’t see the disproportionate cost for labor he presumes being the driver for bottom dollar parts manufacturing.

      • 0 avatar
        HerrKaLeun

        I agree. I’m the first one to bash the UAW. But the days of empty beer cans in the cars are long over.

        Manyt “domestic” are Mexican or Canadian built anyway.

      • 0 avatar
        Good ole dayz

        28-Cars-Later: Please see my clarification above. I consider assembly issues a minor contributor to the inferiority of UAW products. Rather, I attribute it to UAW-ized manufacturers cutting cost (quality of components) in to try to offset the higher costs imposed by the presence of the UAW (work rules / featherbedding; pensions; health care etc.).

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I agree with this point, although who is to say the bean-counters still would not have their way without the “UAW” tax?

        • 0 avatar
          fozone

          Germany (and most of Europe and even Japan) have strong, pro-union, pro-labor movements. The benefits auto workers receive in these other first-world economies are similar to those in the US, and in some cases greater.

          How is it that other countries can manufacture a car that isn’t a POS with such a handicap?

          The answer is b/c it *isn’t* the union’s fault — If a car is a pile, it is because the *management* that approved the design and materials choices made it so.

          It is up to *management* to balance cost, quality, and time-to-market appropriately.

          Blaming their failures on a bogeyman like “the union” isn’t really helpful, nor will it lead to Chrysler ever making better cars.

          • 0 avatar
            Good ole dayz

            In Japan the culture accounts for the lack of impact unions have on quality — it is a collaborative mindset. Contrast with the history of the UAW, adversarial quasi-Marxist class warfare, and seeking (and getting) six-figure total compensation packages for unskilled labor.

            As for the Europeans, their unions are just as bad as the UAW.

            Which explains why, increasingly, “European” vehicles are being assembled by non-UAW Americans in the Southeast (and Mexico).

            To be sure, Ford / GM / Chrysler have had bad management. But to attribute their inferior quality solely to that, without “crediting” the “contribution” of the UAW, is burying one’s head in the sand.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            He argues the additional costs incurred by the existence of UAW force the domestic OEMs to cut materials costs to make up for the loss and I agree with him. I am simply adding even without that up to 2K per unit cost, there is no guarantee bean-counters would not stay creative to keep cutting materials costs to increase margin in said domestic OEMs. I personally cannot speak to the how and why of mfg in other first world socialized countries, but as Good ole dayz points out, an increasing number of European and Japanese mfgs are moving some production to Mexico. I find this curious as Mexico as a whole is only two steps from being a failed state, companies with a large industrial presence may find themselves paying a “cartel protection tax” in lieu of a “UAW tax” at some point if not already. My guess is they would prefer the former over the latter.

            “The landmark deal was designed to protect UAW retiree benefits if the companies’ finances deteriorated and to remove an ever-increasing liability that the automakers said added as much as $2,000 to the cost of a vehicle.”

            http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/06/24/us-ford-uaw-idUSBRE95N10J20130624

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            “He argues the additional costs incurred by the existence of UAW force the domestic OEMs to cut materials costs to make up for the loss and I agree with him.”

            You shouldn’t agree. It’s a bit of nonsense that isn’t supported by facts.

            American reliability was inferior to that of Toyota and Honda because of differences in production processes. The mass production methods invented by Henry Ford and used for decades depended upon interchangeable parts for quality, with too little QC during the production process.

            Blaming the workers for that failure is ridiculous. This was the blind side of the Ford approach, which initially had no QC at all because it wasn’t known early on that quality control was even necessary to ensure proper assembly.

            Toyota improved the production process with lean production, and it took decades for its American rivals to wake up and copy it. (And it would appear that the Americans still haven’t quite got the hang of it.) You can mostly blame stubborn, not-invented-here management attitudes for that failure, too. Giving credit to foreigners for doing a better job is not exactly an American strong suit, and we pay the price for that failure by being slow to adapt to change.

          • 0 avatar
            pragmatist

            How many “European ” cars are actually made in Europe?

        • 0 avatar
          ttacgreg

          Yeah! Let those contemptible UAW workers get their health care and pensions somewhere else, right?
          UAW is an absolute evil. Unions have NEVER done one thing right, ever!
          If only the automakers could utilize child labor, we could have quality and low prices.

    • 0 avatar
      mikeg216

      If there’s anything fiat and Chrysler have nailed it’s diesel technology and competent transmissions. The ltl hotshot market is dominated by ram and follwed by ford. No chevy to be found. Theses trucks rack up a million miles over 5-6 years. You worry too much.

  • avatar
    JuniperBug

    Somewhat related, I drove about 2500 miles in 11 days last month in a 2008 Grand Cherokee Diesel and liked it. The vast majority of it was pulling a decent-sized trailer, and I was impressed with how effortlessly it piled on the miles. The few times I drove trailerless, I was pleased by how well it accelerated. I think the steering feel and effortless highway cruising are what impressed me the most about this thing, and it had about 115,000 miles on it.

    One thing that bothered me – and I suspect it’s a problem with the particular truck I was driving – was that for some reason when you were stopped or driving very slowly, there was a noticeable odor of raw diesel in the cabin. No idea why. I also know that a few years ago the owner had a hell of a time dealing with fuel injection problems, and the truck was off the road for about a week or so in the middle of a trip. Chrysler dealers were less than helpful. The solenoid which engages the low gear in the transfer case appears to be a common problem. In my case, every attempt to engage it resulted in an error code on the dash.

    Another curiosity is that no one knows that this truck exists. A few times gas station attendants treated us like idiots when we pulled up to the diesel pump, and we needed to repeat more than once that it was in fact a diesel engine.

    • 0 avatar
      udham

      What was the error code being thrown? Was it service 4WD or “check shift procedure”. Because if it was the latter, the problem you had was that you were not following the instructions in the owners manual. You need to be below 3 mph, and the transmission needs to be in Neutral. If it was a service 4WD that was only popping up when you were trying to shift, more than likely the truck needs a new position sensor for the t/case or needs to have some codes cleared.

    • 0 avatar
      pragmatist

      “Chrysler dealers were less than helpful. The solenoid which engages the low gear in the transfer case appears to be a common problem. In my case, every attempt to engage it resulted in an error code on the dash.”

      Ahhh. This is a sordid little problem. A while back there was a recall, because allegedly a problem with a circuit board can cause the transfer case to go into neutral, even while parked. Chrysler did a software patch which presumably ‘solved’ the initial problem but then a lot of owners started to have major problems with the transfer case including the inability to get into 4 low as well as frequent error codes.

      There is a virtual black market in un-patched controller boards from junkyards and people who’ve installed the old boards say they have no further problems. It’s become a question to ask when buying a used GC, has this ‘upgrade been done. If so you probably don’t want the car.

      Chrysler says this is a small number (don’t know how true that is) and that the problems are ‘due to pre-existing conditions’. I would almost buy that except that the dealers seem unable to find the elusive ‘ pre existing’ conditions that need to be corrected. Many of these owners have been back many times, without success.

      There is a rumor that Chrysler has contracted an independent engineering investigation based in Colorado but as far as I know that hasn’t been actually confirmed.

      I look at this with some perverse bemusement. Our spare car is a 97 GC and the transfer case is 100% mechanical (pulling the shift lever engages the gears), no circuit boards to fail, no software patches to go awry. If you look over the forum discussion boards at the percentage of problems caused by electronic and control systems, you’ve really got to wonder.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      “Chrysler dealers were less than helpful. The solenoid which engages the low gear in the transfer case appears to be a common problem. In my case, every attempt to engage it resulted in an error code on the dash”

      If this started happening after it had a re-flash to the drivetrain control module for recall N23, it’s probably due to that. The re-cal changed the fault tolerances for the transfer case actuator. It’s probably got a C140F code in it. If that’s the case, Chrysler will cover the actuator replacement under the recall as collateral damage.

  • avatar
    Ion

    Kinda surprising the ML diesel isn’t any louder than the gas engine. Sure it sounds like a Diesel engine but it’s a quiet Diesel engine.

  • avatar
    hybridkiller

    I’m a diesel fan AND a Jeep fan (own one of each), and I see no reason to buy this unless you tow a lot and need an off-roader to do it. Jeep diesels have always been kind of meh mpg-wise, and obviously things haven’t changed much.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    In NJ today reg gas is less than $0.10 than diesel fuel so it it not that much more , diesel does cost more but the spread is about 15 percent in winter to cheaper in summer

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      PA turnpike today the difference was just knee .35 cents. In Ohio it is over .65 cents difference.

    • 0 avatar
      Fred

      Here west of Houston TX where we have a lot of ranchers pulling round bails and tractors with diseal trucks and it’s about 10 cents more than Premium at about $4.05 a gallon. I think the oil companies are screwing with them.

      • 0 avatar
        redav

        There’s cheaper diesel for machines that are never driven on the road. At least in other states there is.

      • 0 avatar

        Out to screw everyone. Kill rail, put more Tractor Trailers on the road. Supply Demand. Add in kill off efficiency and yup. Profit, rinse lather repeat. See world at large.

        Sucks.

        But I would love to take a Diesel, and a Pentistar on just 1 real world rotation of my commute (300 to 400 miles, flat and serious twistys, 3 days a week. Snow and closure of hwy 120 causes use of Benton crossing so + 100 for 3 months in winter) Just to see what there real world is. I know what my fleet runs, I log book it.

        Just really curious. I wana see how modern stuff compares to older well kept stuff in a real world environment.

    • 0 avatar
      pragmatist

      Where in NJ are you????

      This evening it was 3.47 for reg, 4.09 for diesel on rt 78

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    The diesel only makes sense if your towing something heavy and let’s face it the JGC is not and has never been a good tow vehicle. I have to give Fiat credit though for offering it and especially the 1/2 ton diesel Ram Now if I could only get a small diesel(I4) with a 8sp tranny in a good truck/SUV like a Sierra or Suburban.

    • 0 avatar
      mikeg216

      It’s not the ideal tow vehicle because of length, but there’s no other vehicle that can tow 8000# and go off road and take a trip to the yacht club and be valet parked and driven through the snow with complete confidence. It’s every bit the proper suv and truck.

  • avatar
    SLLTTAC

    My 2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee Overland 3.6L with all options, built in March 2013, now has almost 22,000 miles (35,400 km) and seems to be built well and has generally performed well. Fit and finish are good. On the other hand, Chrysler has been slow to upgrade software and firmware and electronics have had several failures. A failure of the passenger seat airbag sensor under the front passenger’s seat caused the loss of cruise control; a warning on the dashboard told me to have the airbag system serviced; and a message to appear on UConnect that the telephone system required service. The dealer from which I bought the Jeep installed a new sensor; after four weeks the Jeep has had no problems. If my Jeep fails again, then I’ll buy a 2015 Subaru Outback. I’ve had six Subarus, which have been reliable and done the job. My first Jeep, a 1987 Cherokee, was horrifically unreliable and unsafe. My 2014 Jeep is my second Jeep; I hope it fares better.

  • avatar
    340-4

    Just got back from a nearby dealership, where they have a line of ’14 JGC diesels.

    $50k a pop.

    They can’t move them, and are trying to dealer trade them for something they can sell.

    “They don’t have these at my local dealership,” said I. “Just a few 3.6 models.”

    “They’re smart,” said the salesman.

    Interesting.

    Plus, on the lot, a Ram ecodiesel. First I’ve seen. They can’t sell it either – $50k.

    Salesman said “We used to have people come in every day asking for one, saying they’d buy one when it came in. Now that they’re here, nothing.”

    Beautiful truck, but $50k.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      Maybe they just didn’t have them in the requisite shade of brown?

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        I’m guessing no, because (oddly enough?) full-size pickup trucks are making a comeback in brown among all manufacturers. Almost certainly due in some part to the Western image.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Well no wonder, it doesn’t even show up until the mid trim Outdoorsman Quad Cab package (which really looks like an Ex Cab) msrp at $34585 in 4×2 and its a $4,000 option vs the Hemi V8 at $1,150. I see there’s also a $500 up-charge for the 8-speed 8HP70 (hd?) AND it prompts you to “upgrade” to 20in wheels for $1400 more. This takes my net price to $40,180 and I STILL don’t have 4×4 or a towing package selected (it seems if I screw with it in 4×2, I can get it to drop the 20in wheels and it drops to $38,780, can’t get it off in 4×4). This is a base truck with no other options selected other than what it defaults too. Sergio are you sh*tting me? Stupid, stupid, stupid.

      Evidently fleet grade Tradesman 4×2 starts at 24K and other various trims go up about 2K apiece leading up to Outdoorsman Quad Cab. I’m not even going to bother building with the others, but let’s assume there is a $4,500 options charge for the 3.0 Diesel based on Outdoorsman’s data. Why are you forcing people into a quad cab just for fuel efficiency or towing other than greed? You’re building the stupid things in Mexico @ $5/hour for frack’s sake. Tradesman 4×2 Diesel for 30K might actually sell to people who use trucks as tools and not toys, an $8700 up charge for bulls*it not so much. Heck we’re still only talking 4×2, for 40K otd why the hell is 4×4 not a free option? Looks like 4×4 is already $2945 more.

      I’m starting to see why dealer’s can’t sell these and its your company’s fault Sergio. Drop the bulls*it, offer the engine honestly and see what happens.

    • 0 avatar
      turboprius

      If they need to move them, 50K won’t do it.

      A couple years ago, new, loaded 2012 Galants were selling for 16, 17 grand. Sticker was at least 10 grand above that. If I were the dealer, I’d mark them down to the price of a normal Limited 4×2 V6 with that sunroof package, and maybe even add some haggling. NOTHING down to Laredo territory.

      But there might be a bunch of behind the scenes stuff that would prevent that from happening.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    I’m one of those crazy people who likes the diesel clatter. Old school diesel trucks are cool, and the sound of a 2 stroke Detroit with no mufflers is downright monstrous.

    As for a diesel Grand Cherokee? I’d rather have a Hemi Durango, honestly. I like the Durango’s look better and the Hemi is one of the best V8 engines out there IMO.

  • avatar
    05lgt

    This new JGC with the 8 speed and new infotainment is fantastic, and now it comes in another flavor. The pentastar for driving, the V8 and SRT for bragging or dragging, and the diesel for towing. This diesel isn’t an economy choice, it’s a towing choice. The better MPG: my unchecked math estimation is 12% ish less gallons used, using 3% more expensive fuel, will save $4500 in about… Never. It’s for towing.

  • avatar
    bunkie

    I got some time in my Sisters 2014 Pentastar JGC this weekend, doing about 120 miles of mixed driving. I had previously driven her 2012 Pentastar JGC. This power train is nothing short of fabulous. It’s smooth and always seems to be in the right gear.

    I was a little disappointed in the ride, however. Over tough Pennsylvania roads, it seemed unsettled. Despite having a comfortable spring rate, the damping/spring rate combination seemed overwhelmed by road ripples, over-correcting and imparting a clearly-felt low-frequency motion that made it feel as if the wheelbase was shorter than it actually is. I wonder if this is an effect of the trim level as it was a fairly pedestrian Laredo 4×4 model.

    Otherwise, I love this vehicle. The value proposition is unmatched.

    • 0 avatar
      mikeg216

      Try it with the air ride suspension, it’s like driving a tank floating on an cloud. No bumps shakes or rattles, bank vault solid.

    • 0 avatar
      05lgt

      Next door neighbor has a low spec 14 Pentastar 4×4 JGC, and the ride is perfect on Oregon roads. Maybe in hard freezing climates the air ride is worth the coin, but in my locale the standard suspension seems ideal. The telepathic transmission is the real star, with the infotainment adding serious sparkle. It even did well on wet clay (well, it did OK, which is better than anything but a tractor). The hatch opening allows full access to the better than the competition between wheel well floor space too. As long as FCA didn’t spec cheap wiring connectors (still mad at you VW) or something equally customer disservice this vehicle will grow Jeeps market for over a decade.

  • avatar
    joe_thousandaire

    “For me, that would be a nicely equipped Laredo with the gasoline V6.” – I think you mean Limited, Derek. A nicely equipped Laredo is something of a oxymoron, you can’t even get leather seats.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Laredo at one time used to be a top trim, I would have made the same mistake. Its tough to keep track of the trims esp if the OEM decides to randomly downgrade it over the years.

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        Wasn’t Silverado the former top trim of Chevrolet pickups? Now all Chevrolet pickups are Silverados, always found that interesting.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        It isn’t random down grading it is something that has gone on since GM introduced the Bel Air. Back then is was model names and every few years they trotted out a new name for the top model and moved the previous down market. The Bel-Air got pushed down by the Impala and the Caprice took its top spot. Ford did similar things. However having different model names for the same car from the same brand isn’t done anymore. Now they have trim levels and they do the same thing of trotting out a new top dog every could of years. At one time the LX trim was the top of the line for a Ford but it eventually fell off the bottom of the ladder just as Bel Air and Impala did.

        Since they can’t afford to make drastic annual changes like they did in the past they can put out a new top trim to ensure everyone knows you aren’t driving the latest and greatest.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    For those complaining about build quality being a ‘union’ problem, the GM plant in Oshawa Ontario is unionized, its workers being members of Unifor (ex Canadian Auto Workers and previously United Auto Workers). For years this plant has stood at or near the top of all North American auto plants for build quality and productivity.

    As we used to know in North America and as the Japanese know, having studied Demming, employee relations, quality and productivity are part of corporate culture and management therefore gets the union that it deserves.

    When executives get obscene bonuses with no performance requirements, when executives get obscene buy-outs after driving their organization into bankruptcy, when they approve defective parts and uncompetitive designs, why do the workers get the blame?

  • avatar
    philadlj

    What’s all this about diesels having to be smooth and quiet? If I’m paying for a diesel, I want to HEAR it.

    That “agricultural rattle” is one of its best qualities, IMO. It’s endearing and nostalgic.

    How else are you (or the drivers around you, for that matter) going to know it’s REALLY a diesel (and that you paid more for same) if it doesn’t sound like one? What’s the point?

    If anything, they should try to make the sound LOUDER to complement the butch looks.

  • avatar
    charlie986532

    I have the JGC Ecodiesel and love it, the audible sounds, economy and drive. I don’t know why so many writers feel they need to advise us on what we should do with our money, shut your fn pie hole and shove your opinion in your ass. The initial cost will be made up in the fuel economy and resale. I was able to get over 33 average in a drive from CA to CO recently with the 4×4 model.

  • avatar
    Ashy Larry

    Re pricing on the JGC Diesel, BMW learned quickly that it needed to eliminate the price premium for the X5 35d and 335d models when it introduced them in 2009. So BMW USA offered a $3500 “Eco Credit” on the 35d models, initially to stimulate interest with the hope of whittling it down to zero as interest surged.

    My understanding is that customers thronged to buy the X5 35d (something like 40% of X5 sales were diesels) but BMW came to realize that they would have to keep the credit in place or customers would not buy it as readily.

    I am not sure how Audi or MB handle this, as they also carry premiums over the gas V6 versions of the ML/GL and Q7 SUV’s, but I don’t think any of BMW, Audi or MB see the diesel getting close to, if not surpassing, the V8 versions in price. Like you see with the GC diesel.

    Jeep should rethink the pricing on this if it wants to make the diesel a long term viable option.

    FYI I own an X5 35d and while it is a wonderful car in most respects, the diesel is particularly rattly, more so than the Touareg, MB, Audi, Porsche or Jeep diesels.


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