By on July 15, 2014

Mustang-SVT-

Germany must be a popular holiday destination for residents of the Motor City if today’s activity at the Nurburgring is any indication. Both Ford and General Motors were out in full force with their latest high-performance wares.

Both the upcoming 2016 Ford Shelby GT350 and the Cadillac ATS-V sedan were spied lapping the famous racetrack. The ‘Stang and the Caddy are entirely different performance propositions, with the ATS-V rumored to be adopting a twin turbo V6 engine to leave room for the CTS-V, which has traditionally had 8 cylinders.

The GT350 appears to be bucking the trend of forced induction, opting for a higher-reving naturally aspirated V8 – our sources say that a supercharger won’t fit under the new, pedestran-safety-oriented front end.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

29 Comments on “A Pair Of Loud Americans Invade The Burgerkingring...”


  • avatar

    It’s too bad the American car companies are chasing German handling dynamics instead of MAKING A BETTER CAR FOR HORRIBLE AMERICAN ROADS.

    What good is a car that can run the Nurburgring in 7 minutes if:

    a) it costs more than the top 10% of America’s population can afford.
    b) the people driving it are old and drive slow and cautiously
    c) the streets will DESTROY the rims and undercarriage
    d) the speed limits don’t allow you to exceed speeds you can easily exceed.

    • 0 avatar
      bachewy

      a) Who cares? As a kid didn’t you have posters of exotic cars on your bedroom walls? Besides, it gives people something to aspire to. Otherwise, what’s the point of getting promoted.
      b) Because they’re the ones who can afford it. Otherwise 20 year olds would be in them and killing themselves.
      c) In Detroit, yes.
      d) Hoon where there are no cops, or on the track as shown in the pictures.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Because what people usually think of as “a better car for horrible American roads” is too mushy and floaty to be safe with big power. Without control and feel, 700 hp is just an accident waiting to happen.

      • 0 avatar
        319583076

        See “Love the Beast” for empirical evidence…it’s even a Ford product!

      • 0 avatar

        You made a typo:

        7-hundred-and-7.

        • 0 avatar
          3Deuce27

          That ‘7’ isn’t going to help that porker get around the Ring in any time that would represent all those ponies.

          In that vehicle, 700 or 707, are just bragging numbers for delicate immature egos as it isn’t going to be competitive anywhere in any regime other then, maybe, the parking lot at your local Dairy Queen on cruise night, and that is tenuous maybe.

          Pull that poser into our DQ on Friday night and a number of other highly capable cars will have much more HP. Better tie off your tail and keep your legs tightly together, if you bring it around here.

      • 0 avatar
        raph

        Naw, I’ve got 650+ at the rear wheels on my daily and its not an issue except when summer tires meet the frozen hydroxic acid.

        Fuel injection and traction control with an electronic throttle make big horsepower entirely managable.

        Now if your idea of being a man’s man is leaving the traction control off and gunning the throttle from a stop and around a turn then well… yolo

    • 0 avatar
      3Deuce27

      A lot of European roads aren’t the best, that is why Euro cars handle the rough better while maintaining good control/composure, versus American cars. It is one of my main reasons for driving a BMW or a Merc’, that well mannered ride despite poor road surfaces .

      What good is a car that can run the Nurburgring in 7 minutes if: _ Because it can.

      a) it costs more than the top 10% of America’s population can afford. _ The top 10% can afford just about any vehicle.

      b) the people driving it are old and drive slow and cautiously. _ Who are you talking about? The ‘Old’ guys I know who own fast cars are still hooning them, but they are “cautious” about checking for ‘the man’ before dropping the clutch on 500-lbs. of torque

      c) the streets will DESTROY the rims and undercarriage. _ Only if your stupid enough to not look where your going. Besides … it’s a TRACK car.

      d) the speed limits don’t allow you to exceed speeds you can easily exceed. _ It has never stopped Me… Yee! Haw! I’m a “Cautious” habitual offender.

      Is this the same guy talking up faux ‘Hemis’ and ‘SRT’s? Seems you need some space ‘BTSR”. The dense population areas of the East’s, rules and heavy enforcement have you kowtowing to the ninnies and authoritarians. You need a trip out to the Wild West so you can let your wild thing loose.

      Sunday I ran a rollicking 50 miles from Cave Junction, Or, to almost Crescent City, Ca, and back. Some of the most fun you can have or two or four wheels on tarmac. The roads in some places, actual, tightly curve around gigantic Redwoods and the road is in perfect condition. On the return trip a guy in a WRX played with me all the way back to Cave Junction. He finally tired or the missus did, or he just wanted to see what/who was glued to his butt. Good time. I would have bought him a micro if he had stopped at the Wild River Brew Pub.

      I will write you a prescription for some time with a Sevenesque and its 3.2 pds. per Hp. Now there is some hooning fun

      • 0 avatar
        Ion

        I don’t know about the BMW’s but the Merc’s can’t handle nothing till you ditch the shitty Conti’s for a set of michelin’s.

        • 0 avatar
          MBella

          I disagree. I find they work way better with Contis. Most Michelins are to loud and wear strange on a Mercedes.

        • 0 avatar
          3Deuce27

          Conti Sport and Extreme Contact’ all the way. Ultra High performance_ Summer or Ultra High performance _ All Season. I’m just annoyed they don’t make them in a 14″ anymore.

          That said, I do use other makes of tire. Some ok, some good to excellent. My annual tire budget would fund Single Payer Health Care in a micro state in the third world, so I get to try out a lot of tires. Some actually last a whole weekend, not competitively, but hey..they become more fun when they go away, plus when they do start going away, you have to finesse your game and drive like you know what your doing. If you did that from the start, you might actually be competitive at the end.

          Tires and brakes, drive smoothly and save those and you save everything else and might make the podium or stay out of the repair shop.

          Oop’s we were talking ride and road noise. No matter the brand, both go way with age/heat cycles… its the undeniable laws of chemistry.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      Rolling billboard BT, you go in looking to buy a GT350R and ride out in a loaded EcoBoost or GT or if your willing to stomach a 144 month car note even a lesser GT350.

      Same thing with the ring, it’s mostly cheap advertising with a little emperical data gathering.

      And finally for those of us living south of the Mason Dixon and free from the Baghdad IED road simulator known as the roads up north big inch rims and low profile tires aren’t an issue ( although truth be told the best roads I’ve ever driven on were in southern Illinois )

    • 0 avatar

      And the engine fills with carbon, as it idles down the West Side highway at 5 mph in Manhattan.

      The Bluetooth will get the biggest workout of any part of the car.

    • 0 avatar
      seanx37

      Actually, he has a point. GM should just test their cars out on the horrible Mound Rd. Right outside their gates. I still have no idea why GM allows the roads right in front of their Tech Center be so bad. Do you think the road outside Mercedes in Stutgart look like they were cluster bombed?

    • 0 avatar
      LectroByte

      You’re just cheesed off that the Challenger/Charger never run the ‘ring.

    • 0 avatar
      Onus

      I’m going to chime in on the roads.

      Here in New England the roads go to crap after the winter, as I’m sure happens in New York as well.

      I quite enjoy switching to an old Camry (1996) for daily driving. It soaks up the bumps well.

      Don’t need handling when I’m just going to get stuck in Traffic anyway while i commute.

  • avatar
    DeeDub

    That seems like an awfully dangerous place to let the kids play with their sidewalk chalk. I guess mores are just different in Europe.

  • avatar
    319583076

    A local dealer has a really nice 2014 GT attractively optioned and seductively priced. I hadn’t considered a 2015 prior to seeing this beast.

  • avatar
    Rday

    Fiancee has an 07 Cobra 500 parked in my garage for storage. we drove it back to Kansas City from LA this spring. great handling car and fun to drive. but mileage is terrible around town. Got 24+ on the roadtrip. OK for driving in the Southwest where everyone drives 85+. Not much fun around town. Seats are great but i don’t like the 6 sp manual. Just getting too old i guess. I hope everyone gets to drive a performance car at least once. Reminds me of my youth.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      There is no such thing as an 07 Cobra 500.

      Check the SVT certificate and it says “Ford Shelby GT 500″. I also still have my window sticker and it does not have the word Cobra anywhere on it with the badging referred to as “Shelby GT500 badging” and Lemans top stripes with GT500 side rocker stripes. The embossed owners manual only says Shelby GT500 as well.

      The only Mustang Cobras have been the Mustang II Cobras and the fox body/sn95 cars (with the exception of the 1968 Cobrajet Mustang but that was a homologation car as with modern day Cobrajet race cars).

      The Cobra badging on the original GT350 and GT500 was simply Carroll Shelby’s trademark (as the original cars were never referred to as Cobra Mustangs either)

      The only GT500s that are anywhere close to being a Cobra would be the post title Super Snake cars.

      • 0 avatar
        LectroByte

        A lot of folks call Shelby GT’s “Cobras”. I’m guessing the OP has a Shelby GT500 like one of my co-workers, he calls it a “Cobra Mustang” and who are we to argue with that?

        • 0 avatar
          raph

          That is like calling every Porsche vehicle a 911 because its manufactured by Porsche. The bottom line is that there are Shelby Cobras and they were manufactured until 1967 an Anglo American sports car with the exception of a few non Shelby branded Mustangs. Referring to a Shelby as a Cobra is simply incorrect.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I’m more interested in seeing how the performance of an Ecobost 4 cyl Mustang compares to the V6 or even a GT from 5 years ago. Return of the SVO?

    • 0 avatar
      3Deuce27

      Reg; Modified “-“> “I’m more interested in seeing how the ‘Ecobost’ Mustang Performs” Yes, PDan, Don’t really care how it performs against the V-6 or V-8, but I’m sure interested in its overall performance.

      When I bought my SVO in 85′, I didn’t even consider the GT, it was a non-contender for me, so it was never compared, same situation today. The GT was/is a nostalgic vehicle for those who need to relive the past in a new vehicle.

      I’m far more interested in a real performance version of the V-6 then a V-8. To bad Ford blew it with the speed limiter and weak drive line in the current generation. Hopefully, the new generation of the V-6 will give us more chassis capability and drive line durability with a speed limiter commensurate with its potential performance envelope, especially for the road/track, it doesn’t need more Hp. It is capable of 150+mph, but limited to 112mph.

      If the Ecoboost is speed limited, I won’t buy one until there is a remap available.

  • avatar
    Halftruth

    I don’t get the infatuation with the Onionring.. Why don’t they use the Isle of Man course as well? Would that not be more realistic anyway for day to day and a little turn tossing? There are many tracks in the US that would do just fine.. but I get it.. they don’t have the “cache” that the ‘ring has. Stupid ‘Mericans don’t know anything anyways, right?

  • avatar
    3Deuce27

    The ‘Isle of Man’ is a temporary course through villages and on country roads. The ring is a dedicated road course that is challenging and relatively safe. It is also a modern vehicle performance bench mark(with considerable cachet), that is why it is used, that and the facilities are geared for OEM’s to set-up shop.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributing Writers

  • Jack Baruth, United States
  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Vojta Dobes, Czech Republic
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Cameron Aubernon, United States
  • J Emerson, United States