By on July 23, 2014
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My own hearing isn’t quite good enough to pick up on the engine noises here, but I swear I heard a few turbo sounds in this very short clip. Maybe Acura will get around to releasing the damn thing soon enough.

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52 Comments on “2015 Acura NSX Spied At The Burgerkingring...”


  • avatar
    carguy

    The new NSX has been teased with concepts and spy-shots for so many years that most enthusiasts have just given up waiting for it.

  • avatar
    Astigmatism

    Sorry, Acura doesn’t release cars any more. They just make enough for journalists to get seat time in, then let the extras sit on a lot in Sayama.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    The new NSX has become the Duke Nukem Forever of cars.

  • avatar
    geee

    Can’t even pass a Supra. Clearly, it does not exist.

  • avatar
    rpol35

    Burger King Ring? really?

    • 0 avatar
      WheelMcCoy

      >> Burger King Ring? really?

      This I believe can be traced back to Jack Baruth… and well… the name stuck, at least here on TTAC. The point was that BurgerKingRing / Nurburgring times were absurd bragging rights that had little to do about cars in the real world. Times were also susceptible to weather conditions, road conditions, and the condition of the driver, so there was a high bogus factor.

      When the first NSX came out, I was a drooling fanboi. This one? I like it, but I just can’t get worked up about it in the same way.

  • avatar
    Zykotec

    I have a (hotwheels or matchbox)model of a certain VolksWagen project that I had yeeeaaars before the actual car (that was still slower than a Callaway Sledgehammer) was released.
    Compared to the NSX’s teasing, the Veyron teasing was like hearing Stephen Hawing recite ‘Lord of the Rings’, live. I guess they have just about everything to loose on this one, so they better get it right before they start selling the thing.
    (it’s only been 2 years since they showed the concept car, even if enthusiasts have been waiting 15 years. It took VW 4 years after the concept just to make a running prototype)

    • 0 avatar
      319583076

      The Veyron represents the proverbial quantum leap in auto technology in many aspects. I wasn’t aware that the new NSX was developing and debuting any ground-breaking technology. Unless I’m wrong about that, the long development time of the Veyron is understandable whereas comparing the NSX to that development time may not be.

      • 0 avatar
        Zykotec

        Chopping up 4 Golf VR6 engines from the early 90’s, putting 1 turbo on each,welding them together, then covering half the car in radiators before the awful 90’s looking body goes on, to stop it from overheating. Not to mention designing the car first, then going to the windtunnell and finding out that it would need 200 hp more then the Callaway Sledgehammer to manage the same topspeed…tehcnology my a**…it’s called ‘throwing money at it until it works’.
        There are people out there with no proper education, building better/faster cars in sheds, with budgets that wouldn’t cover a change of tires on the Veyron…
        The original NSX debuted tech like ‘reliabilty’ and ‘userfriendly’ to supercars, the new one probably shouldn’t be much worse. The sad thing is, not many supercar buyers cared back then , and even less will care now…

        • 0 avatar
          319583076

          What’s your technical education and/or background? It’s one thing to dismissively write that they chopped up 4 Golf engines and welded them together, it’s another thing entirely to understand the very real engineering constraints and compromises. I don’t have any inside knowledge or really any specific knowledge of the Veyron. I do have two engineering degrees and two engineering licenses, so I like to flatter myself into believing that I know something about mechanics, materials, thermodynamics, etc…I certainly don’t believe the Veyron was or is an exercise in welding 4 Golf engines together etc…

          As to the idiot savants building better/faster cars….well “better” in this sense is what they call “unenforceable language”, i.e. we can argue about it but it will never be resolved. Faster is a little better, but still subjective to a degree. This is also the place to point out that the Veyron is a factory car with a warranty and obligatory safety standards. It seems like its also a relatively nice place to inhabit. All things that the shadetree geniuses you mention are either lacking or neglecting.

          The original NSX was quite remarkable for many reasons, but the new one seems like an also-ran in the current market. The perennial exotics have continuously improved while Honda was building CR-Vs. Of course, the very fundamental point of a supercar isn’t performance or even driving related – it’s about demonstrating that you have the financial resources to own and operate a machine that 99.9% of the population never will.

          • 0 avatar
            Zykotec

            Well, I am a self-proclaimed VW ‘dis-liker’ in the first place, so some hyperbole may have slipped in.
            As for ‘better’ car, I agree, it would be too subjective, but a certain Swedish suoercar comes to mind.
            I don’t respect the Veyron much as an engineering feat, as much as I respect VW for never stopping to pour money on it, because the result is nonetheless an amazing car, which also very well fulfills the need of those who are afraid to be looked upon as ‘not-filthy-rich’, much better than any Honda will.
            And I think the fact that it took some 6-7 years from the initial design to the finished car, made the design hilariously outdated before it was even launched. (especially since both Audi and VW had passed that design language by before the Veyron was on the road)
            But I think people exaggerate the waiting for the NSX because they were expecting it long before Honda ever agreed to build it, and I don’t think Honda is ready to use their customers as guinea pigs, yet.

          • 0 avatar
            319583076

            I think you’re probably right on about financial mis-management of the Veyron program.

            I also agree that owners of the new NSX are probably going to get a Honda supercar rather than a VW supercar with all of the connotations associated with those manufacturers.

            The Veyron isn’t cheap speed and it very well may not be efficient speed, but it’s a pretty remarkable automobile.

      • 0 avatar
        darkwing

        By my definition, making a “quantum leap” involves doing something essentially untried or implementing something essentially unproven. (Preferably involving Dean Stockwell in some way. But not Bakula, because, seriously, screw that guy.) The engineering that went into the Veyron was truly impressive, but it was more about scaling up existing techniques than it was about doing something entirely new. (So not unlike the LF-A, bodywork excepted.) I’d argue that the Tesla Roadster represents more of a “quantum leap” than the Veyron.

        You could make the case that the NSX’s novel hybrid system qualifies as a “quantum leap”, albeit a small one. I know the hybrid system is the main reason Acura hasn’t committed to a launch date for the AWD RLX (much less impressive because the drivetrain’s oriented the wrong way); I suspect that’s in large part the issue here too.

        • 0 avatar
          319583076

          I chuckled about your Stockwell and Bakula comments so I agree with you. Quantum leap is a funny term, literally it is a very small distance although figuratively, the arrival of quantum theory represented the more popular understanding of the term, it was definitively world-changing.

          Honestly, I’m not intimately familiar with either car. I’ve read most of the online news regarding both, but my finances and interests are much more pedestrian. My opinion is that the Veyron represents a larger measure of our inexorable “progress” toward whatever terminal state we’re heading toward than the NSX.

      • 0 avatar
        nickoo

        New nsx will use a new form of shawd, two electric motors/generators to drive the front wheels and for electromagnetic braking/regeneration energy recapture. The rear engine connects through a 7 speed dct directly to the rear wheels. I’d say this is pretty innovative.

  • avatar
    Boff

    Doesn’t sound like the automatic transmission does a good job of holding onto lower gears.

  • avatar
    sitting@home

    So is this the part of the real world shakedown testing where the car has to contend with pickups, CUVs and riced out Toyotas weaving across the road at 20mph under the speed limit ?

  • avatar
    James2

    Yeah, but what America really wants to know is if that Ram at the beginning of the video really broke the 7 minute mark.

    Also loved the BMW X5 with the turn signal flashing…

  • avatar
    turboprius

    Is it common for cars in Europe to not have model badges, as that Supra, that X5, and that Volkswagen station wagon only had manufacturer badges.

  • avatar
    Ion

    By the time they do get around to putting this out it will be like the LFA. Out classed and overrated with decades old technology. Then they’ll limit the production numbers so they can charge a ludicrous amount of money to foolish collectors. Finally 10 years from the release date no one will remember the car anymore than they do that super car Jaguar made.

    • 0 avatar
      NoGoYo

      I remember the Jaguar XJ220!

      It was a diecast replica standard back in the 90s. I’ve seen them in 1/64, 1/43, 1/24, and 1/18 scale.

      • 0 avatar
        Zykotec

        I remember it too. It was silly fast (for the 90’s), and it’s engine was strangely enough based on the first turbocharged passenger car engine. Ofcourse it had been through a couple of generations and some group-B rally cars, but still.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    The original NSX wasn’t as beefy as other supercars for its time, but it made up for that with an NA engine and simple MR set up with elegant styling that stuck around for a bit.

    This new one has none of that, complicated engine with a needless 4WD system and a beak. Unless if at some point Acura re designed it.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    The only laps of the “Onionring” that impressed me were Sabine Schmidt’s Top Gear Transit Van lap and Andy Carlile riding a modified 2005 Yamaha R1 with a time of 7m10sec measured bridge to gantry, and the full time calculated at 7m24sec.

  • avatar

    Just FYI, that same Acura NSX prototype burned to the ground at the Nurburgring a few hours ago.

    http://www.roadandtrack.com/go/future-cars/acura-nsx-on-fire-nurburgring?src=spr_FBPAGE&spr_id=1459_75579376

  • avatar
    THE_F0nz

    http://oppositelock.jalopnik.com/clearly-a-supercar-now-1610107845/1610115878/+pgeorge

    I guess it will be awhile before its ready for the bigtime… This example appears to have burnt to the ground.

  • avatar
    ccd1

    The big problem for the NSX is the BMW i8. The Bimmer is a tech tour de force for a relative bargain price. After all this time, how does Honda top this car??? The i8 greatly increases the chance that the introduction of the new NSX will be a non-event if and when it FINALLY appears

  • avatar
    tjh8402

    I thought I heard the turbo wastegate whooshing, especially on the downshifts. very disappointing engine noise, especially when you consider the howl that the first NSX was famous for. this darn thing is way too quiet.


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