By on May 22, 2014

volkswagen-golf-r-wagon-spy-photo-03

We may not be clear on whether the Volkswagen Golf wagon will get all-wheel drive in North America, but it looks like VW is hard at work on an R version of the Golf wagon.

Spotted by AutoGuide photographers on its second Nurburgring run, this prototype looks a bit more polished than the last mule we encountered. The MQB-based wagon borrows the 296-horsepower 2.0T engine and Haldex AWD setup from the Golf R, and thanks to the flexibility of MQB, the marginal cost of making this car for world markets is likely low enough that VW can produce a limited run. North America, with its distinct regulations, might be another story. The business case for an R Wagon is tenuous at best – but we can always hold out hope.

 

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35 Comments on “Volkswagen Golf R Wagon Gets One Step Closer To Reality...”


  • avatar
    hubcap

    How about an R version of the GLI. I think the business case might be a bit better that the wagon, in the states at least.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      A Jetta R would be nice. Unfortunetly, our Jetta is different from the Euro Jetta and VW would have to make a business case for selling it only here. I don’t know if they’d have enough buyers. VW R cars tend to be lot poison in the US.

    • 0 avatar
      jvossman

      Dear VW-Hi, I’ve owned a S4avant, numerous GTIs and now a jetta tdi wagon. I hope this thing is about 35k and will be coming in the next 18 months, Where should I send my $10% deposit. Thanks.

      John Voss
      MIA FL

  • avatar
    OneAlpha

    Ah, Volkswagen. Audi – without the reliability.

    That being said, I’ll pass on the brown diesel myself.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Import it to the US; all 38 customers who line up for this will buy it.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      At least 15 of those people will be smart enough not to line up for it, wait six months, and then buy it with $6000+ on the hood and 0% for 60 months. If they do it right, they won’t be underwater while driving off the lot with no money out of pocket.

      • 0 avatar
        Fordson

        And yet further down in the comments there is a guy saying that as recently as February, the best offers he saw were MSRP + $1k.

        You might want to research transaction prices on Golf Rs, new and used. Nobody’s underwater.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          I never said R owners would be underwater. R model reiduals are super high. Eventually someone will want to sell a car. It was very common for 04 and 08 R32s to go for $4k-6K below sticker once VW threw cash on the hood. It seems VW has not discounted the current R’s as much and the 2.0T AWD combo is more popular than the 3.2 V6 AWD combo (plus having 4 door models). I asked a dealer recently about the Golf R they had on their lot. He would sell it at invoice + 3%.

          In 2009, I purchased a new 2008 R32 for $26K. Sticker was $32K. If I still had it, it would be worth at least $15K right now.

  • avatar
    xflowgolf

    Derek, this brings up a topic I’d like to learn about more from TTAC. Could you consider shedding some light on what is/isn’t required to “federalize” a car?

    IIRC, the quoted breakeven on CTS-V wagons was something like 7 cars. The CTS-V already existed. The CTS wagon already existed. The combining is basically a bolt on of existing packages.

    How is this different? The Jetta wagon already exists. The Golf R already exists. The drivetrain/AWD architecture already exist. With MQB isn’t this a similar bolt in affair? Why the big hurdle?

    • 0 avatar
      OneAlpha

      I have a copy of the list of modifications the NHTSA required to federalize the R33 Skyline years ago, and it essentially comes down to using a MPH speedometer, adding airbag labels, relocating the door crush bars and welding in a few minor gussets here and there.

      Essentially, nothing. Except for the body, nearly all of the non-powertrain systems are shared with the 300ZX and 240SX, which were already US-legal.

      Even the right-hand-drive position would’ve been okay. It was mostly emissions certification for the RB26 that held up the importation.

      I suspect it’d be a similar situation for this car, probably even less, considering how much more global cars are today.

      • 0 avatar
        xflowgolf

        I don’t know that the R33 is a fair comparison though, as that car didn’t exist in the USA in any trim level.

        The Jetta wagon on the other hand will already be on dealer lots. The drivetrain being proposed in the “R” will also already be on dealer lots in the Golf R. So effectively all parts, chassis and drivetrain, will already be on the road in the US, thus emissions/parts/etc. would’ve already seemingly jumped through process of being legal.

    • 0 avatar
      fredtal

      It maybe a collection of existing parts but it would be considered a new model and have to go thru all certifications and tests. The only hope we have getting these types of cars is if US and European regulations are unified, which is currently being discussed. Just don’t get your hopes up.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Regulation unification IS going to happen. Probably sooner than you think. ALL the car makers want it now, as opposed to the past when the US makers didn’t want it as a barrier to entry to the US market, and the Europeans didn’t want it for fear of gray market imports, and because regs for their European production were so much looser. I don’t think the Japanese ever really cared. Now everybody wants it to reduce costs, since the regs are 95% similar now anyway.

  • avatar
    FractureCritical

    oh VW, legendary makers of unobtainium and unmaintainium.

    and their club-footed kissing cousin Audi – makers of grey sedans and haters of all things wagon. If AoA had a brain to rattle around between any three of its executives, they’d just put the damn 300 hp 2.0T from the R/S3 in the allroad and be done with it. As it sits now, the car is just an overpriced Outback trying to play it straight.

  • avatar
    1998redwagon

    yawn. it is still too small for my purposes.

    a passat wagon – yes. but then me and 5 others would be interested.

    why the love for wagons? don’t know b/c i never grew up with one. but i sure have had my share of hatches and wagons over the years.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      Because wagons are the best of what an CUV can do with cargo space and fold down seats, but still retain a car’s handling, power, mileage and all the other comforts.

      In other words, they make sense. Then BMW goes out and builds ‘em with a 3 series body and now it’s a cool wagon!

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        FWIW, I think the current 3er wagon is not nearly as good-looking as the E91. In particular, the design gets a bit clumsy around the D-pillar of the new one,

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          Despite owning an e91, I think just the opposite. I think the new one is the better looker. The e91 tapers way too much towards the rear. The f31 is much squarer, and has MUCH more cargo room as a result. Usefully larger inside everywhere, actually.

          If BMW would solve their cranial-rectal inversion problem and sell me one without AWD and automatic, I would sign the papers for one tomorrow. I’d even settle for a RWD diesel automatic – the diesel works well enough with the 8spd to make me happy. I have ZERO use for AWD on an on road vehicle though, and I like my current car enough to keep it. When the going gets tough I drive my Range Rover. :-)

    • 0 avatar
      Extra Credit

      I share your appreciation for wagons, but I’m not sure what you’re carrying. The new Golf Wagon provides 605 litres of cargo space behind the rear seats versus the Passat Wagon’s 603 litres. No argument that the Passat Wagon delivers larger exterior dimensions, but you may be surprised by what will fit inside the Golf Wagon. Fold the rear seats down, and the Passat Wagon wins handily on cargo space. I’m usually carrying people and cargo, so I appreciate the more nimble dimensions and handling of the Golf Wagon, along with its more accommodating price. :)

  • avatar
    lon888

    I don’t think this would be a wise investment for VW. When the 2012 Golf R was announced all the VW fanbois went nuts until they found out they were $35K plus $2000 to $4000 dealer mark up. The additional mark-up killed the sales and you could still buy a new one 2 years later. Of course, many of their arrogant dealers wouldn’t knock off the additional mark-up until the very end.

    • 0 avatar

      The dealers were the issue for sure. In February I was looking to move into one from my GTI – found a new one on the lot priced $1,000 above MSRP. They refused to move on it at all, let alone to a reasonable price.

      Same thing happened with the R32. The demand is there (even at prices close to the MSRP), the dealer network shoots themselves in the foot.

    • 0 avatar

      The dealers were the issue for sure. In February I was looking to move into one from my GTI – found a new one on the lot priced $1,000 above MSRP. They refused to move on it at all, let alone to a reasonable price.

      Same thing happened with the R32. The demand is there (even at prices close to the MSRP), the dealer network shoots themselves in the foot.

  • avatar
    notapreppie

    So, this is basically just a Jetta R Wagon…?

  • avatar

    I used to own a WRX wagon, back when they were more Wagon-y.

    I’d consider springing for a GolfR long-roof.


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