By on April 29, 2014

EuropeCSegment2013

 

Today’s chart of the day comes courtesy of JATO Dynamics and Automotive News Europe, showing last year’s C segment car sales in Europe (click to enlarge).

While ANE reported the data in the context of the Volkswagen Golf’s (undeniable) dominance of the C-segment, the remaining data provides a lot of insight into the global automotive landscape.

  • Per JATO, Ford sold about 223,000 units of the Focus in Europe last year – but in the United States alone, they sold 234,570. What does that say about the strength and size of the American market (where compacts are a big segment, but dwarfed by mid-size sedans, pickup trucks and CUVs), or the relative smallness of Europe’s market, which has substantially more brands and nameplates vying for a smaller piece of the pie
  • Vauxhall/Opel may be struggling to stay afloat, but the Astra is a perpetually strong seller for the brand, while the Chevrolet Cruze doesn’t even rank in the top 10. Then again, the different Golf variants (SEAT Leon, Skoda Octavia) are absent too.
  • Both Toyota and Honda have a lower profile in Europe than in America, but the Auris seems to have resonated strongly with European consumers. Not only is it beating the Peugeot 308 and Citroen C4, but also the Hyundai i30 (Elantra GT) and Kia Cee’d, which have been giving VAG a fright in key markets like the Czech Republic, as well as winning critical acclaim from the European motoring press. The Civic languishes in 10th place, selling about 50,000 units. You can bet that Nissan is looking to pick it off as it prepares to ramp up its own C-segment entrant.
  • Combined sales of the PSA twins (Peugeot 308 and Citroen C4) add up to about 178,000 units, while Hyundai and Kia’s combined sales equal about 185,000 units. Would you have expected this to happen a decade ago? If anything, it shows why the blogosphere talk of PSA returning to America is bunk (nevermind that it was merely wish fulfillment based on comments by CEO Carlos Tavares taken out of context). PSA doesn’t even have their house in order at home. They aren’t going to spend billions to return to a market that likes to buy the kind of products they don’t build.
  • Back to the Auris. It’s coming here as a Scion. And it’s supposed to be a great driving car. On the other hand, there won’t be a Toyota-badged car to replace the Matrix.

 

 

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71 Comments on “Chart Of The Day: Europe’s C-Segment In 2013, And Why Peugeot Isn’t Coming Back To America...”


  • avatar

    Isn’t an Auris just a Corolla? I’m under that impression. The styling is a bit more dramatic than the Corolla but it’s just the same. Which is to say that it shares the Corolla’s strengths and weaknesses.

    If and when Southern Europe ever picks up again, French and Italian offerings in the segment will rise. Northern Europe only does VW and Ford and GM in this segment (and Volvo and others like it). What seems undeniable is that a part of the European market has gone Asian and won’t be coming back.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      And the Astra is just a Verano. But the Verano is the best selling, near-luxury C-segment in the US.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      Saying “it’s just a Corolla” is kind of disingenuous, because Toyota sells a lot of Corolla variants, and the North American, JDM, LatAm and European versions are quite different in how they’re tailored. Even the platform is very slightly different for each market.

      For example: “Corolla” is practically a sub-brand in Japan, given the number of models that bear the name, and almost all of them have little or nothing to do with the Corollas sold elsewhere in the world.

      It’s akin both how VW sells MQB cars /and/ how VW sells multiple platform generations.

      • 0 avatar

        I wasn’t putting it down when I said “just Corolla”. What I meant to say that yes, while there are differences, even technical differences, on the main, except design, the Auris and Corolla are one-and-the-same-ish.

        • 0 avatar
          psarhjinian

          I understand; what I meant is that the differences between the various Corollae are pretty dramatic: witness the Corolla Rumion (aka the Scion xB), the North American Corolla, the Auris and the Japanese Corolla and Corolla Fielder.

          This would be like comparing the Mk4 Golf/Jetta (which VW still sells!) with the Mk6 and Mk7/MQB Golfs, as well as the Tiguan and Skoda Oktavia.

          It’s kind of a bugger, because Toyota plays really fast-and-loose with the name.

          • 0 avatar

            True! Just ask Matt Gasnier of bestsellingcars fame. Tricky to classify. Guess pretty much all do that. A great “offender” is VW with the Jetta-Golf-Vento. Always a question of where to draw the line.

    • 0 avatar
      b787

      Auris is built on the same platform as Corolla, actually it is the succesor of the Corolla hatchback. However, its suspension is quite improved – higher powered versions (1.6 petrol, 2.0 diesel and hybrid) offer independent rear suspension, additionally, the chassis is supposed to be stiffer (compared to the old Auris, don’t know about the current Corolla).

      I haven’t driven the versions with torsion beam rear suspension, but the higher end Auris models are indeed good to drive, except for the steering, which is typical column mounted EPS.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Anyone waiting for Southern Europe to pick up again has a long wait. The Euro is overpriced for the South, but the North prefers a high priced Euro. Long term, the South will have to leave the Euro so its biggest economy, Italy, can go back to devaluing the lira to stay competitive. They’ll have to devalue their debts to Germany in the process, which ought to be a 3-ring circus, so stock up on popcorn. To survive until then, Fiat(-Chrysler) has to depend on Eastern Europe for European sales and Ram/Jeep sales here.

      • 0 avatar

        I see Germany giving up their rings in order to not lose their fingers. The crisis has abated somewhat in France, but there was a definite trend a year ago for France, Italy and Spain to gang up on Germany. The problem is that when the Euro was adopted, prices immediately increased in Southern Europe while salaries didn’t. The South tried to deal with it applying orthodox monetary policies which only deepened the problems. Of late, more heterodox policies have been enacted and if this is effective or just a stopgap depends on your ideology. Anyway, Germany has bought sometime but they can’t keep on remaining competitive in European terms by draining the South forever.

        • 0 avatar
          gtrslngr

          Marcelo de V . I beg to disagree good sir . From first hand knowledge [ friends - family and associates living their ] France – Italy – Spain – Portugal etc along with the Benelux as well as the Scandinavian countries economies are all teetering on the brink . The UK is barely keeping its head above water despite all the ‘ Stiff Upper Lip ‘ rhetoric coming from them . Germany is now seeing the Bill that is coming due all too soon [ time for Deutschland to Pay the Piper I\'m afraid ] starring them right in the face . Add to that a rapidly growing Extreme Right as well as the resurgence of Anti Semitism thru out them all . Eastern Europe being on the ropes financially … and now with pressures being placed upon them by Russia ne; the New Soviet Union under Vlad the Impalers leadership .

          Fact is . Much like us [ US ] As well as y’all [ Brazil ] All the political rhetoric – smoke & mirrors – hype & hyperbole in the World is just barely masking the economic reality/ catastrophe lurking around the corner waiting to hit us ….assuming nothing is done to change things

          Damn that is depressing to post !

          On a slightly more positive albeit somewhat off topic ending . 20 years come Thursday . Obrigato Senna . The memories as fresh as the day they all [ from the inception of his career ] were created .

          • 0 avatar

            Obrigado Senna indeed! Though I confess I was always a bit more partial to Piquet.

          • 0 avatar
            MrGreenMan

            This appears to be a trend – things go south in the final years of an American presidency. (Dot Com Bubble Burst, 2007/8 stock market collapse after Lehman Brothers, etc) We have restored the business cycle after extend-and-pretend ran out of juice.

          • 0 avatar
            djn

            I was always more partial to Fittipaldi than Senna or Piquet.

  • avatar
    fredtal

    Curious the Civic does so poorly in Europe. What is it they don’t like?

    • 0 avatar

      Europe is not Brazil and Brazil is not Europe and all that, but from what I can gather the negative points are the design, internal and external, noise, quality and cheap feel of interior and to many it’s too hard. Also, in this segment, there are lots of sales to companies and Honda is not considered a “local” maker and in terms of company sales you tend to go with the local make in order to satisfy as many people as possible.

      Plus, for private buyers I think that in most Euro markets Honda demands a premium. Being that it seems only VW can command a premium in Europe, people are hard pressed to prefer a Civic over a Focus or Mégane.

    • 0 avatar
      mike89

      Ugly as sin. Lack of competitive engines (especially diesels). Limited dealer network. Expensive for what you get. Parts are expensive too. On top of that, Japanese automakers don’t have in Europe the same reputation they enjoy in the US.

    • 0 avatar
      fredtal

      I just read the Autocar review of the 2014 Civic. http://www.autocar.co.uk/car-review/honda/civic/verdict
      They seem to like it. Also I gathered that the compact car in Europe is the standard family car, while the USA considers it more of a economy car. Probably explains why the luxury compact car is so popular there as well.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      It isn`t just the Civic that does poorly. Honda itself doesn`t do well, that is why there is no new Acura TSX planned because the donor vehicle, the Euro Honda Accord, has been cancelled.
      I would have thought the big two Japanese companies (Honda and Toyota) would do well, but Europeans like driving dynamics and that is why Mazda does better than Honda in Europe even though it is outsold massively elsewhere by Honda.

      • 0 avatar

        > but Europeans like driving dynamics and that is why Mazda does better than Honda in Europe even though it is outsold massively elsewhere by Honda.

        Maybe it’s the factor for why Mazda does better than Honda, but the Civic doesn’t really drive worse than a Golf. Maybe they just need to make a Civic 5-hatch.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      The previous gen Civic was criticized for its rough ride and cheap interior and it wasn’t exactly a looker either.

      The Focus, Astra and Mazda3 are definitely more of what the Europeans are looking for in this segment.

    • 0 avatar
      haudit

      The Civic is more than a little overpriced in Europe. It lacks the dynamic ability of the Focus, or the perceived quality of the Golf, but is considerably more expensive than either, and in some cases, notably the diesel engined versions, is as or even more expensive than the comparable Audi A3 or BMW 1-Series.

  • avatar
    Vega

    The more interesting statistic in my view is that the premium offers in the C-segment (which strangely are not in the chart) would all slot in ahead of the Toyota Auris. Audi A3 (167,015), BMW 1 series (152,453) and Mercedes A class (130,864). Given the A3 is based on VW’s MQB-platform, the cost advantage from scale for Volkswagen are even more significant.

    • 0 avatar

      Caught my eye too. Could be that the premium entries are so overwhelmingly company cars that they skew the market?

      • 0 avatar
        Vega

        Definitely company cars contribute, however don’t underestimate the “wife/daughter of well earning lawyer, banker, manager etc.” -market. He has a 5 series company car, privately buys her a 1 series. I see it all the time here in Germany.

    • 0 avatar

      Tomorrow’s post :)

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      Not a surprise since the Golf is considered (rightly or wrongly) to be the most premium offering of the mainstream brands in the compact market. Ever since the Mk 4 with its soft touch interior and other refinements the Golf has held the standard (again does matter if it should or shouldn’t) for the buying public as a top quality mainstream car. It just shows that the average car buyer in Europe wants a premium vehicle when the Golf is #1 by a large margin and Audi and BMW would be in the top 5 and selling multiples of the Auris, Civic, 3 etc.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    I keep forgetting Peugeots were ever sold in America. I guess they weren’t nearly as popular in America as Alfa and Fiat were, because I’ve seen Alfas and Fiats but no Peugeots.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Peugeots were enormously popular in Europe when I was stationed there with the US Air Force. Several GI’s I knew bought them (used or slightly used). But as I recall the gasoline-version 404 and 505 were not at all dependable and required a substantial amount of service-bay time.

      Those GIs who were thinking of bringing their Peugeots back to the US with them quickly changed their minds once they found out the cost of parts and the lack of dealerships across the US.

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      You saw a fair number of them in larger college towns. I imagine the same was true in major cities. But you certainly weren’t going to encounter them in flyover country.

      Like so many 80′s imports the 505 was hugely attractive to me but I couldn’t afford one. I found it a handsome, restrained and graceful sedan with a nicely French styling flourish in the front end.

      505s and Saab 900s made me ache with frustration back then. Some kind of superior intelligence emanated from their clean, functional designs.

      • 0 avatar
        raresleeper

        I still find the 505 is an attractive machine, but the PRV under the hood kills it for me.

        Always go the diesel route, perhaps?

        I’ve heard the 505′s ride very smoooooth.

        But the good news is that now, you can afford said 505.

        • 0 avatar
          Kenmore

          “you can afford said 505″

          Uh-uh. No more wrenchy-wrench and rust-in-mouth for this guy.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          The Peugeot version of the PRV was pretty much bulletproof. It shared very little with the Volvo or Renault versions. It was also VERY rare in the US. The 505 Turbo far outsold the V6, and in turn was far outsold by the 2.0l and then 2.2l four cylinder 505s. The diesels sold reasonably well in the earlier cars, but by the mid-80s most were gasoline.

          The biggest issue with them certainly was the VERY small dealer body. To the average corner garage mechanic, a 504 or 505 might as well have been the Starship Enterprise. And yes, they have a ride/handling balance that still can’t be beat. Cars do not have to ride like buckboard wagons to handle well, something the Germans have never quite understood (thought he British do).

          RWD Peugeots were and are my one true automotive love. I have owned 4 504s and 4 505s, all were absolutely wonderful cars. Sadly the parts situation makes them fairly untenable in the US at this point. Too old now, and they are long gone even in Europe due the demand to export them to Africa.

          • 0 avatar

            Wonderful comment and one that I agree with completely. One reason cars that are not the norm have a hard time is that your local mechanic does not have the tools, willingness to learn or economic reason to become acquainted with relatively rare cars. Instead, they often spread myths and misconceptions.

            BTW, something akin to this happens to Japanese cars in Europe. In major cities no problems but head out into the country just a little.

            Here in Brazil, I might be soon in a position I’ll be doing a lot of long distance driving. Being our market the way it is, I’m exploring the possibility of buying another Fiat to make it through. Why? Because any old mechanic will know how to work on it should the need arise. A Renault could be more difficult depending where I’m going and like krhodes so rightly points out, VW doesn’t realize a car needs to be hard like a springboard to handle. Luckily, Fiat does.

          • 0 avatar

            Edit to my comment above: “VW doesn’t realize a car DOESN’T need to be hard…”

      • 0 avatar
        Macca

        @Kenmore – about three years ago I found myself on a similar commute as an ’80s Peugeot 505, it was dark blue and appeared to be in great condition. This, in Tulsa, OK, no less. So at least one made it to flyover country!

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        I think I’d rather have a V6 Alfa Milano, even if it would kill me with maintenance costs…the 75 is one of my favorite sedan designs ever (only eclipsed by the even more fantastic 164 that sorta followed it), Alfa’s V6 is legendary for its performance and sound, and as a guy with plenty of Italian blood (great grand-dad came here from Italy in 1910) I feel the desire to own a proper Italian car.

        • 0 avatar
          raresleeper

          Killing you with maintenance costs would be an understatement, NoGoYo.

          • 0 avatar
            NoGoYo

            Well I’m sure a Milano/75 isn’t drastically LESS reliable than any other Alfa, unlike, say, an Alfasud.

            Those things would rot away in your driveway…

          • 0 avatar
            mike89

            Mechanically, Alfasuds were pretty reliable (for a of the era), the problem was the rest of the car.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          Having owned a GTV-6, the engine is the part you worry about least. The engine is quite reliable. Actually, once sorted out the whole car is pretty reliable. Certainly nothing like what uninformed people would lead you to suspect, and the parts costs are not bad either. No worse than a Volvo, for example, other than the bits that are specific to the GTV-6, like the windshield or the radiator. Even those parts are on par with a Porsche.

          Clarkson got it spot on when he said that the sound of an Alfa V6 is like having your soul licked by angels. :-)

          • 0 avatar
            NoGoYo

            The GTV-6 is one of the cars featured in the 1986 Road and Track magazines I had randomly given to me as a kid, and so I remember it forever (along with the likes of the Lincoln Mark VII, Ferrari Testarossa, Lamborghini Countach, and BMW M635CSi).

            It’s a damned cool looking car for sure, and that V6 has quite the reputation…

            https://www.yo utube.com/watch?v=-bueBeVBfcQ

            This 75 sounds absolutely fantastic.

    • 0 avatar
      djn

      I’d be willing to bet that Peugeot out sold Alfa. You still see many Alfas because their owners have lovingly collected them. Not too many Pug fans and collectors. There are probably more Citroens around in the USA even though they stopped selling them here in the late 70′s.

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    Not too long ago, the Golf competed here with the Stanza, Omni/Horizon, and Corolla in the sub-compact B segment. It doesn’t seem to have gotten much bigger over the years, so can I assume a C segment vehicle in Europe is smaller than the American counterpart? Is America the only place that differs in segment sizes? How do the tallest population on the planet, the Dutch, fit into these cars(realizing they haven’t yet developed American, er, girth)?

    • 0 avatar

      I believe Brazil and Europe follow similar classification. Cars like Focus or Golf have always been considered here mid-compacts. Size-wise, intermediate between compact and mid-size. Compact in Europe are Panda, Polo, Fiesta. Sub-compact is Fiat 500, Kia Picanto. Up until now the US didn’t really get sub-compacts.

      Anyways cars are all taller now. Compare the roofline of an Escort to that of a Focus. Or an 80s Golf to one today. Though a tight fit for very tall people, modern cars have gotten taller.

    • 0 avatar
      Johannes Dutch

      They even fit into WAY smaller cars than the VW Golf. The Golf is a C-class car. But then you still have the VW Polo (B-class) and the VW Up! (A-class) Other examples of A-class cars: Toyota Aygo, Renault Twingo and Opel Adam. You would probably call them micro-cars…

    • 0 avatar
      Vega

      I’m 6’3, there’s more headroom in the back of a Golf than in a 5 series.

    • 0 avatar
      Vega

      The Golf has grown tremendously over the last 20 years. Even the current Polo is bigger than a Golf 2 of the late 80s. The current Golf has more interior space than a E34 BMW 5 series in the 90s…

  • avatar
    gtrslngr

    PSA will never come back to the US . Fact is PSA [ as well as Renault ] will be lucky to survive the next decade even in the EU/UK … never mind make a Come Back to the US of A . Why ?

    1) They are both so behind the Eight Ball when it comes to technology and design that they can barely sell their cars to most ardent FrancoPhiles and French men/women no matter how ‘ patriotic ‘ or fervent a Francophiles they may be

    2) Both are so utterly strapped for cash [ even Renault despite the Daimler/Nissan tie in ] neither could afford to create the infrastructure needed in order to make a return to the US market

    3) The French auto industry over the last 30 years has completely lost/destroyed their Mojo when it comes to innovative technologies and striking/original designs that might set them apart from the competition in an already over-crowded US market place . Both having become pastiches of French cars more often than not hiding others mechanicals underneath a barely if at all French exterior

    So to paraphrase the famous Seinfeld episode . When it come to PSA and Renault in America ;

    ” No French Cars for You !!! “

    • 0 avatar

      You are probably right as to PSA. It’ll take them a long time to get back into the US if they ever.

      Now Renault is a different story. Numerous systems, parts and whatnot are already in the US albeit in Nissan cars. Renault still commands a good market in Europe, is growing in Latin America, North Africa, East Europe, Russia. Nissan is big in the US, all over Asia. I really don’t understand how you can place Renault and PSA in the same boat.

      As to French design, it’s alive and well. The current Peugeot line has been beaten with the beauty stick. The Citroen DS line is awing people the globe over. Renault, after an age of excess under the misunderstood brilliance of Le Quément, is “normalizing” their cars. One can only hope they find the right degree of that and not fall into the same blandness as everybody else.

      Just a different opinion. No offense meant.

      • 0 avatar
        Tosh

        “The Citroen DS line is awing people the globe over.”

        Please tell us more!

        • 0 avatar

          Tosh, I believe you are aware that Citroen has now established the DS moniker as a non-retro retro sub-brand selling better finished and equipped Citroen cars. They now have the Ds3, DS5, Wild Ruby among others. From small hatchbacks to big SUV-CUV things. From what I see the Europeans, Chinese, Latin Americans all have the chance to buy them and the reception has been very good both in the press and internet. As to actual sales, don’t know if this exercise is doing anything for the bottom line.

          I’ve covered some of the offerings here on TTAC if you look for them.

          • 0 avatar
            Kenmore

            Marcelo, why did they have to squash the roof on the DS5? It looks beautiful otherwise.

          • 0 avatar

            True, I agree with your assessment, LOL! Even though Citroen would like to pretend the DS line is groundbreaking, it’s not. Guess they feel they have to follow some of current, modern design standards to sell. I think they want to call attention with the designs but not make them so wacky that they’re unsaleable like some recent Renaults (Avantime, VelSatis, even last generation Mégane or Scènic).

          • 0 avatar
            mike978

            The DS3 was very well received by Top Gear. Clarkson isn`t known for his liking of the French but he liked the Orange DS3 Racing that he tested.

      • 0 avatar
        gtrslngr

        Marcelo de V . I beg to differ once again good sir ! Citroen can barely give away the ubiquitous DS despite its having on the verge of MINI underpinnings . Renaults sales have been so poor that Nissan has been seriously considering dropping the moniker in favor of Datsun / Nissan / Infiniti .

        As to French design . Unfortunately and according to the French themselves … There Is No French design anymore . It all having morphed into some overly homogenized factory made croissant – where the genuine butter has been substituted with cheap synthetic shortening [ re ; Pillsbury ]

        e.g. They aint nuthin ” French ” at all with todays so called French designs . Fact is the only thing worse than the current French automotive school of design is in fact the pathetic excuse for coffee they’re been serving over the last five years [ NYTimes Economist etc ... try and find a decent cup in France today ]

        No Marcelo . I realize you’re a bit young of age [ younger than me at least ] and therefore have no direct contact and little memory as to the radical and innovative designs that once came out of the French auto industry year after year back in the day . Such as the 2CV … the original DS … the Citroen SM …. 505s 205′s … jeeze …the Renault 5 …. A110s .. Matra Bagheera etc

        The current range of DS’s , CaterPines [ Caterham/Alpine collaboration now dead in the water ] etc being mere and pathetic pastiches of the Glory days of what once was French design

        Honestly Marcelo . And as much as it pains me to say this . The only areas the French have stayed on point despite all the glories of their past [ Art - Literature - Architecture - Music - Fashion etc ] is with their cuisine as well as their better wines . Even their fashion industry having gone to the dogs … in more ways than one

        OT – Senna – Piquet – Fittipaldi etc . They were all greats in my book . With Senna though … well … it was personal … someday I’ll let on why .

        • 0 avatar

          Well those yeah. I have had contact with the 2CV, 205, Renault 5. Loved them. Except the 205, never got to drive them as I was too young, but I remember them very well as they made a lasting impression on me.

          The newer cars may not have been so thoroughly French (i.e., using similar tech to everybody else), but they were still beautiful. The Pininfarina 405, the 306, the 206, Scèncic, Twingo all captured the imagination. The current 208, the best looking B-segment for A-segment prices 301, Captur, Mégane all look pretty good. DS3. No, they’re not the same as they were, but they still offer a nice break from prevalent designs, especially those in the US.

          In other words, though they’re not as distinct as they once were, they still offer some (including me) reasons enough to buy them.

        • 0 avatar
          haudit

          You seem to have gotten your facts a little muddled. Renault is the dominant partner in the Renault-Nissan alliance, owning a 44% controlling interest in Nissan. Nissan, by contrast, owns a 15% non-voting share of Renault.

          • 0 avatar
            Mandalorian

            A another big problem for French makes in the US is lack of high displacement engines. France/Europe has some wonky tax system on bigger engines. They have a few V6s in top trim models, but the majority are diesel 4-cyls.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    Peugeot could attempt to mount a comeback to the US because it has new ownership with goals for the company. As the largest car market outside of China, the US remains an attractive prize.

    That doesn’t mean that such an effort would work. But I could see the push being made if they’re eventually willing to put enough cash into it.

  • avatar
    vvk

    Peugeot 106 I rented in Europe was a terrific car! I enjoyed driving it tremendously.

  • avatar
    NN

    would be interesting to see Citroen come over with the Cactus and try the 2 year cellphone style plan in major cities. Might work in the big cities.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Peugeot = French has been. Politically they don’t know what to do with it – seriously. Nobody wants to be the Govt of demise or the sell out. So batten down those hatches & hope for the best.


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