By on January 17, 2014

2014-Mitsubishi-Mirage-G4-Sedan _1_

The Montreal Auto Show is shaping up to be a blowout for fans of B-Segment cars. Aside from the usual Quebec specials, Montreal has been the launch pad for the Canada-only Nissan Micra and the Mitsubishi Mirage G4 you see above.

Looking like every other too-tall-sedan, the Mirage G4 isn’t officially slated for North America – Mitsubishi is officially studying it for our market – but it will likely come here, bearing identical mechanics to the Mirage. With hatchbacks positioned as a “premium” model in many small car ranges, the Nissan Versa might have some competition for the title of “Cheapest Car On Sale”, with the Thai-built Mirage G4 having a good shot at sneaking into the sub-$12,000 bracket.

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46 Comments on “Mitsubishi Mirage Sedan Set To Cause Heart Palpitations In Canada...”


  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Is this the first Thai-produced car sold in Canada? It would certainly be the first for the US. I don’t see how a Thai car is any better than a Chinese car though.

    • 0 avatar

      Ford is moving the Fiesta to Thailand for the next gen.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I suppose they have more experience building “acceptable” modern cars there than China does, but still.

        I wonder why the Malaysian marques haven’t come along as well, Perodua and etc.

        • 0 avatar

          My Nikon DSLR is Thai made, I wouldn’t have known if the camera store clerk didn’t mention it. Thailand has a fairly long history of auto manufacturing. The new GM mid-size trucks were developed there. I am not nearly as skeptical as I am for domestic Chinese cars (the Chinese Fit I drove last year was indistinguishable from a Japanese example, but the BYDs I’ve seen are junk).

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            The Chinese will build to any standard you are willing to pay for, from dime store garbage to iPhones. I would expect no issues with the build quality of any first world car built there.

            Whether I would actually buy one is a different story entirely, but it would not be because of build quality.

            Of course, the quality and design of domestic Chinese vehicles is an entirely different story. But a Tata Nano isn’t exactly up to Western standards either. Nor was a Trabant or a Wartburg, back in the day.

          • 0 avatar
            krayzie

            Fact is a lot of the manufacturing base in Japan have moved to Thailand for a very long time. One time I opened up my old Made in Japan Sony Trinitron TV from the late 80’s just to find a bunch of Thailand made parts inside. A lot of OEM car parts are also made in China now but nobody would notice until going to the dealership parts counter to buy such parts. Making the final product at the same vicinity as where a majority of the parts come from makes a lot of financial sense.

        • 0 avatar
          mjz

          No dealer networks, meeting emission/safety guidelines. that’s why. Mitsu has an established dealer network here.

    • 0 avatar
      mjz

      Mitsu already sells the Mirage hatch in the US, so technically it would be the 2nd Thai built car here if you consider the sedan a separate model.

    • 0 avatar
      srogers

      In 1989 I bought a Colt Turbo made by Sitipol in Thailand.

    • 0 avatar
      LALoser

      MB sent assemblers and management from a few scattered plants, mostly ZA, to observe Thai assembly and the respect they give to the finished product. Thai workers cleaned every part and inspected every connection, and even took of work shoes and put on clean indoor slippers to drive the completed cars to storage.
      I have worked with Thai assembly of major projects, their calmness and focus on detail is top shelf.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Despite my heavy criticism of Mitsubishi lately, this car could have a shot at relevance in the US due to its low price. That would make it different, and different is what Mitsubishi needs.

    • 0 avatar
      mr.cranky

      Cheap doesn’t have to mean “crank windows, no A/C, manual”.

      I love how some people cling to the romantic notion that driving a manual somehow makes them superior to the plebes that drive slushboxes.

      I think that all that manual shifting in “stop n go” driving would be a waste of a good transmission.

      • 0 avatar
        -Nate

        @ Mr Cranky :

        ” I love how some people cling to the romantic notion that driving a manual somehow makes them superior to the plebes that drive slushboxes.

        I think that all that manual shifting in “stop n go” driving would be a waste of a good transmission.”

        You’re right but it took me 40 years to accept this ~ I remember griding through L.A. down town traffic in 1973 or so , from Carson to Pasadena it took over two hours every day , I had an easy to drive 32 MPG VW Beetle but the clutch madness was driving me crazy(er) so I quit and got another job with less traffic in the commute .

        I still make the same commute daily , farther in fact but as I drive the dreaded slush box it’s no hassle , I just turn on the radio and have at it .

        The traffic on the 110 Fwy. is *much* faster than it was back then , any time 24/7 365 .

        I often get off and drive surface streets to cut my time in 1/2 .

        -Nate

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        If you are shifting all the time in traffic, you are doing it wrong. I regularly navigate Rt 128 around Boston in horrid stop and go traffic, doesn’t bother me a bit. And I rarely change gear.

        Driving a manual doesn’t make me “superior”, but it certainly makes my car more enjoyable, and a bit cheaper. If you don’t enjoy it, buy an automatic. I’ll only hold it against you a little bit, depending on what it is. :-)

      • 0 avatar
        racer-esq.

        “Cheap doesn’t have to mean ‘crank windows, no A/C, manual’.”

        What is nice about the Mirage is that power windows, locks and AC are standard on all models. Stick is another story. A car with a 1.2 liter I3 needs stick to get any kind of decent performance (or something like DSG, but that is not offered in a cheap car like the Mirage).

  • avatar
    -Nate

    Looks O.K. to me .

    I agree the U.S. needs more variety in entry level base model cars .

    -Nate

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Once you’ve shrunk down to the B segment, the packaging doesn’t seem to leave much room for styling. Someone would have to say to Hades with aero and drop the jellybean shape, maybe go back to a 3-box look. Given the CAFE demands to wring every last MPG out of a design, I won’t hold my breath waiting for it to happen. That’s too bad – the space utilization of a first generation Escort wagon was superior to the jellybean, plus you could get it in brown with a manual (but no diesel).

      • 0 avatar

        Not really Lorenzo. All you need to do is look at the new Renault/Dacia Logan, Peugeot 301, Ford Fiesta, Fiat Grand Siena even Honda City to see that small, A or B segment cars can have good design. Comparing to the Versa, this Mirage sedan actually looks good. As usual, with Asian cars, there are weird. not well-integrated elements. In this case the excessive “wing” on the trunk and the back lights are a smidgeon too big. But it’s ok. Heck, build it here in Brazil and it has a bright future.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Cars this size as sedans make no sense to me at all. Hatch please. So much more practical than teeny-tiny little useless trunk. Of course I feel the same way about any car smaller than an S-class. Sedans are just plain pointless.

        And you absolutely could get diesel manual first-generation Escort wagons in the US. I worked for a courier company in college that had piles of them. GREAT cars, and that is saying something for an ’80s Ford Escort! In courier 24×7 use, they would go 750K miles easy. All of theirs where dark blue though, not brown.

        • 0 avatar

          Hey krhodes1, not really, or rather, it depends. Cars designed firstly for the first world, like Fiesta, Versa or even a category higher, like Civic or Corolla, really have trunks on the small side. Now, interestingly and knowing that these sedans are primarily aimed at families, makers from the US and Europe (though for some reason the Asian makes don’t do it) put a humongous and very usuable trunk. For you to have an idea, the Civic has about 380L, IIRC, the Corolla about 400, but the Logan has 510, the Grand Siena 520, the third world-spec Chevy Cobalt 565L! That is very useable. Almost all small sedans have back seats that flip down.

          Pretty good for small sedans and the families that buy them. Remember, though shorter and usually a bit narrower than say a Corolla or Focus, their wheelbases are as long if not longer than a Corolla’s, so quite roomy (especially for developing markets) and a big trunk. What’s not to like?

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          Keep in mind that in most less developed countries, these cars will be loaded to the max with 4-5 passengers, plus cargo. That’s when a sedan eclipses a hatchback in cargo capacity. In the subcompact segment like this, a hatchback with the seats up has a tiny trunk, except for something like a Honda fit.

          • 0 avatar

            Hey gtemnykh! Just checked. The Fit’s trunk is only 384L (seats up). So you can see that the small sedans are even more family friendly than the Fit. The Renault/Dacia Sandero 320L a VW Gol 285, a new Fiat Uno 280/290 (the seats move a bit). So, the Fit bests the smaller hatches, but not the sedans.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            Not necessarily. As an example, seats up the MKIV Golf had the exact same amount of trunk space as a MKIV Jetta. It was just vertical rather than horizontal. Hatches don’t HAVE to be chopped off either. Nowadays half the sedans look like hatches anyway, so why not make them more practical and actually MAKE them hatches. See Saab 900 as the ideal example, though I prefer proper station wagons.

          • 0 avatar

            Hey krhodes1. Yes, I understand what you’re saying perfectly, but there’s a difference in conception there. The ones built for the First World have a bad sloping roof in the back. The Versa is a prime example. Has the best leg room in the back seats (at the expense of trunk space), but even I who am just 5’11 have to slouch back there so my head won’t touch the roof. THe Fiesta is similar. Now, the ones aimed more directly at less developed markets don’t suffer for this affliction. In the Logan or Cobalt I can sit straight up in the back and there is room to spare.

            Seems that, for whatever reason, probably design decisions to combat or augment the “cool” factor, the “first world” compact sedan is compromised. In this case, the practical sides of the sedans are indeed more limited, or not as apparent, vis-à-vis the hatch. In the third world cars, the packaging advantages of the sedans are quite obvious.

            Cars like the Logan and Cobalt and Grand Siena are quite amazing from a packaging and conception viewpoint krhodes1. The Jetta, even though longer than the cars I mentioned and considered to be in a higher category than the cars I mentioned has a 510L trunk. Ties the Logan, loses to Siena or Cobalt.

            I checked now and the Mirage is on the smallish side. It has a 450L trunk. A technical tie with the Versa at 460.

        • 0 avatar
          Lorenzo

          Actually, krhodes1, I was referring to my brown Dart wagon, not the Escort. It came with the slant-6 and torqueflite, and I’ll take that combo (for that car) over a diesel/manual.

          In my family, 6 feet tall-plus seems to be the norm, and rear seat headroom and leg room in a B segment car is critical. Two relatives had no problem in a 1985 Accord sedan I had, but that was probably a large car by many standards outside of North America.

          The sloping rear roof of a B segment car results in lower seat cushions and forces tall people to sit with their knees up to their chests. As tall as the Mirage looks, it likely doesn’t have the rear interior space of the tall greenhouse and flat roof of my ’85 Accord.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            So get the hatch. Solves all sorts of issues, including the sloping rear roof.
            To each his own, I find a modern diesel improves just about anything.

            At 6’2″, I am the SHORTEST of my generation in my family. Believe me, none of our parents cared in the slightest how comfortable we were in the back of the car, we were lucky not to be walking.

            Don’t like the accommodations in the back of one of my cars, arrange your own transportation. I am not in the limousine business.

        • 0 avatar
          WhiskerDaVinci

          I agree that a small sedan is very cramped on space, with a small “useless” trunk. All small cars have practicality issues when compared to bigger ones.

          I guess it depends on how much practicality you actually need in the real world. If you don’t need the space, then why pay more for it?

  • avatar
    mjz

    Well, it looks better than the hideous Versa sedan. The Mirage hatch is pretty well equipped starting at $12,995. If they can bring the sedan here for slightly less, with the same equipment level (since hatches are considered “premium”), they could have a decent seller on their hands, and lord knows Mitsu needs all the sales help they can get.

  • avatar
    roadscholar

    Is that a 13″ rear wheel??? Sure looks it.

  • avatar
    taxman100

    It would be interesting if the sedan would be cheaper, though I’ve heard it weighs more. With that and word a turbo may be an option, I’m thinking gas mileage may be a little less.

    Dealer around here is selling the Mirage DE hatch with manual trasmission for $11,995, and with the CVT for $13,257, including destination.

    With my 14 year old Corolla having an engine that clearly sounds like it should be in hospice care, and my back-up car being a 12 year old Grand Marquis pulling down 18-19 mpg, I’m tempted to replace both with the cheapest to operate car I can drive for ten years. The wife drives a late model minivan, so cargo space is not a priority.

    I need to conserve cash flow as parochial school tuition starts next fall for my first child, and getting over 40 mpg would help that as well.

    • 0 avatar
      mjz

      Check out owner reviews, they seem to like it. For $12 or $13K, why hassle with a used car? It is actually very well equipped. It just might be all you need. I am at a point where I just want to get from point A to B, as inexpensively as possible. I have a 12 year old Vibe (Corolla relative) kinda in the same boat as your Corolla. 214,000 miles, can’t complain though. My mechanic is amazed at how well it has done for the little maintenance I have put in to it.

    • 0 avatar
      mjz

      From what I understand, the Mirage was designed to handle Thailand’s VERY tough, rugged roads, so the Mirage can probably handle the lunar roving surfaces we call roads here in Michigan. Lol. I think the Mirage is a simple, decent transportation device, reasonably well equipped for a good price. Appealing to people on a low budget that don’t want to buy a used car (“Why buy someone else’s problem?” as my long departed and increasingly wise seeming dad used to say).

  • avatar
    dougjp

    Sure it will cause heart palpitations, but only in one situation. That being when a cross wind hits it while being driven on the highway.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      That must be why I see those little cars change lanes suddenly in the mountains east of L.A. and San Diego. They’re usually struggling to reach the speed limit, so I guess it’s best to pass them on the up-wind side.

  • avatar
    IndianaDriver

    If it comes to the U.S., will it get the same 100,000 mile warranty like the other Mitsubishi cars and SUVs?

  • avatar
    etm78

    Watch the link below when it was launched in the Philippines

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pwKLrabacLM

    or full details and specs on below website

    http://www.mirageg4.ph/

    I bought the top of the line of Mirage G4 and its worth buying.

  • avatar

    Wow! Cool! My friend and associate has the hatch version. This is an underrated, hero. The VW Beetle / Model T of this century. Too bad there isn’t the dealership network Geo Metro enjoyed.


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