By on October 22, 2013

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Many dealers are complaining that price differentials between the all new GM pickup trucks and heavily discounted competitors from Ford and Ram are leaving them with disappointing sales results. The new Chevy Silverado and GMC Sierra were launched in June amid heavy incentives from competitive brands. But the trucks, which have been praised by the press, are not moving quickly. Automotive News reports that a Pasadena, Texas dealer says that his supply is up to 170 days, compared to his normal inventory of 110 days supply. A dealer in Austin reports a 120 day supply, up from his norm at 90 days.

GM’s original business plan for the new trucks was to sell premium trucks at higher transaction prices but CEO Dan Akerson’s dual goals of gaining market share and improving profit margins may be conflicting with each other. Dealers now say that to compete with Ram and Ford who are offering up to $9,000 in incentives on some 2013 models, GM will have to start discounting the new trucks.

Dealers feel that once their competitors’ 2013 models are sold off they expect to encounter less price competition but they feel that the lack of incentives on their own 2014 trucks are stalling what is a very important launch.

September U.S. sales of the Silverado and Sierra were down 8 percent, while Ford’s F-series sales rose 10 percent and Ram’s climbed 8 percent.

GM officials have indicated that they’d rather keep transaction prices high than chase after market share. While September sales were down, average transaction prices year to year were up about $3,000. An analyst at RBC Capital Markets said that a $2,000 increase in transaction prices would translate to an additional $1.3 billion in GM’s bottom line for the year.

The company had increased cash incentives on the Silverado to $1,000 at the beginning of October plus another $500 discount on more expensive trim packages but dealers were disappointed when only a week later the company raised the MSRP on the trucks across the lineup by an average of $1,500.

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62 Comments on “Price Differential With Competing Pickup Trucks Has GMC & Chevy Dealers Upset...”


  • avatar
    jmo

    You mean GM is no longer trying to lose money on each one but make it up in volume? Sounds like they’ve learned their lesson.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      I read this story yesterday, elsewhere, and what got me puzzled was why GM raised prices when Ford is at the end of its F150 run and Tundra also introduced a restyled truck for 2014. RAM will never be a player but their interiors are better than similar GMs.

      Ford will, presumably, let GM bask in the light and glory for 2014 but come the 2015 model year, Ford will bring what GM is lacking. In the mean time, Ford is expanding its F-line of trucks for 2014.

      Still, GM is no threat to Ford and I don’t believe Tundra owners will want to pay more for an inferior GM truck. I sure won’t. I’ll buy a Ford before I buy a GM truck.

      Aside from the die-hard GM fans, of which there aren’t enough to keep GM solvent, how many converts are actually paying more to switch to a “NEW!, IMPROVED!!, BETTER THAN EVER!!!” GM truck that has only slightly morphed from the old GM truck?

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Why is the Chevy $2K more then the base F-150? GM really needs to rethink their price strategy if they want to compete against the Ford.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      I agree. Is their base truck worth 2k more? Will they be able to convince consumers it is? In this higly competitive truck market, unless a product is really noticable head and shoulders above the others, it won’t command a price premium. They’ll give in sooner or later and get the price in line. Ford and Ram offer some really nice hardware, if GM won’t deal, customers have some easy alternatives.

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      The base price difference isn’t the problem in and of itself. $2,000 isn’t a big deal on a $30-40,000 truck. The bulk of the price difference is coming from GM’s extremely low incentives right now.

      I could go shopping this afternoon and get into a decently equipped crew cab 4WD Ram or F-150 for around $31-32,000 before taxes. Getting $10,000 off sticker is no trick at all.

      $5,000 off sticker is about as well as you can do on a 2014 Chevy right now and that sticker is already around $2,000 over the competition.

      The real world bottom line is that a new Chevy would cost me about $7,000 more than a comparable F-150 right now. GM has a nicer truck in some respects, you could make a reasonable case that it’s $2,000 nicer apples to apples. But at $38-39,000 to get into a crew cab you’re pricing a lot of people out of the truck entirely and for those who can swing that you’re putting a Silverado with cloth up against a Lariat or a Laramie.

      It’s not that nice.

      • 0 avatar
        dtremit

        I’d argue it *is* a big deal on a base model. Comparing a V6, standard cab, standard bed, 4×2, you’re looking at $26,670 for the Chevy and $25,065 for the Ford. That $1,600 is significant for the sort of fleet buyer that buys a stripped down pickup truck.

        Totally agree with your logic on the higher end trucks, though. And of course Ford has the advantage of knowing GM’s pricing strategy when they launch their new models next year — somehow I have the feeling they’re still going to come in lower.

        • 0 avatar
          Sigivald

          Maybe … but I keep an eye on the fleet trucks I see.

          And I ain’t seein’ a lot of stripper short-bed, short-cab, 4×2, bottom-end V6 trucks these days.

          I mean, there’s *some*, but that doesn’t seem to be where the big sales are; around here I see more extended cabs with V8s, a fair proportion of longbeds, in the 1xx pickups.

          And almost all the class 2 and 3s are crew cabs, and there’s a *lot* of that going on for fleet trucks around here (Portland, OR).

          • 0 avatar
            Kenmore

            “And I ain’t seein’ a lot of stripper short-bed, short-cab, 4×2, bottom-end V6 trucks these days.”

            Too true. Personally I want that but with a long bed. Nobody within 100 miles of me has a 2013. All this frequently mentioned overstock of 2013s does not pertain to me.

            I’m being wooed by a Green Bay dealer who recently got 2014 “work trucks” in but they’re only 6′ beds. Nice prices, though.
            Four of the V-6s are well under 25K.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      The Chevy is 2K more because it’s a better truck. The neighbors new F150 was about 2 weeks old when the tailgate fell apart on it. Really Ford frappin plastic bushings for your tailgate hinges???? No wonder I run GM trucks. I did have fun tellling him this is what you get for buying a Ford!……LOL

  • avatar
    mjz

    Let’s review GM’s strategy: Introduce all new trucks that look exactly like the old trucks they replaced, then RAISE the prices while competitors have huge rebates on their trucks. You would think GM was being run by someone who doesn’t know anything about the auto industry, oh wait…nevermind.

  • avatar
    Waterview

    Two thoughts:

    1) I’m a Chevy guy, so I’m willing to give them the benefit of the doubt, but when you try to sell me acres of hard plastic for $2,000 more, you’re forcing me to look elsewhere. I am – and the Ram looks very compelling.

    2) I remember the days when a new, “hot” model could command a premium price and I think this is still the case for some cars (or maybe even SUV’s). But does the same apply to trucks? I don’t think so.

    • 0 avatar
      dwford

      The “hot” model typically has the freshed styling and newest features. The new Chevy/GMC trucks have neither.

      • 0 avatar
        Waterview

        Agreed. I just think that if you want the “hot” new car (e.g. Corvette), you’re probably not looking at other cars. With pickup (even with a new model), you are probably more willing to consider substitutes — particularly if (to your point), the new model doesn’t overwhelm with “more”.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    I’m with the others, I did go out over the weekend to look at the new trucks, their full of a bunch of gimmicky “mess” that raises the prices and gives consumer more items to fail.
    Do away with-
    AFM
    Electric power steering
    Factory touch screen (no option for a regular radio availible)
    Get rid of backup camera ( not everyone is a terrible driver)
    Put some thicker steel on it
    Use bumper that won’t collapse like tin
    Don’t need bumper step or tailgate auto down feature
    GROUND CLEARENCE seriously wtf?

    Is it so much to ask for a truck?
    The only way to get a truck that is work grade from GM is to buy 3/4+
    I don’t care if it tows 12k if a wreck under 10 mph causes anything more then scratches.

    But I digress, I’m a broken record on this front.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      GM made a truck for you decades ago. Most of those feautres are pretty useful for those who have come to grips with them.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        So cheapness is no longer something that consumers look for?

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          Genreally not. People will pay for useful features. You could probably still order a relative stripper, but they don’t make up much of the model mix, and dealers certainly don’t stock many versus the cowboy limo models.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            That’s my point, a stripper includes everything I listed standard for all levels.
            A stripper does not exist.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            “Electric power steering
            Factory touch screen (no option for a regular radio availible)
            Get rid of backup camera ( not everyone is a terrible driver)
            Put some thicker steel on it
            Use bumper that won’t collapse like tin
            Don’t need bumper step or tailgate auto down feature”

            I haven’t toyed with the option list on the GM trucks, but the last truck I priced out, a Ram 1500 had all of these things optional. Except electric power steering, which is standard, but I find it hard to yearn for a pump and fluid for any real reason.

            The rest is all available pretty much a la carte. I would be very surprised if GM made all of that standard on the W/T models. If it is standard, and you hate that stuff, Ram has a truck for you…

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            And that is now where I set precedence.

            Electric power steering causes problems when you have weight and force on the front end.
            Snow plow
            Oversized tires
            Winching/offroading
            4×4 in general when people are upgrading the front ends, the steering becomes the weak spot.
            Also towing requires road feel when you have lots of weight or on uneven terrain.

            But I challenge you I find a 2014 GM half ton with a factory non touch setup.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          The word is “value” and yes we still want cheap trucks

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            People in geneal know they can’t have something for nothing. Who wouldn’t want a feature laden 50k MSRP truck for 25k? Buyers want more features, not less.

            Aside from fleet buyers, no one wants real life cheap trucks. Everyone wants a good deal on a luxury truck. The market has spoken on that. Even fleet buyers sometimes rack up the option lists as they see the usefulness in many of these features.

            Face it, the days of steel dash, radio delete, no A/C, roll-up window, 3 on the tree pickups are gone. Long gone. Economies of scale have provided better, enjoy it.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            New technology is great, HOWEVER, counter productive technology isn’t worth my time.
            I have no use for a truck made with planned obsalance(sp?)

          • 0 avatar
            mkirk

            Danio I just got a Frontier that has roll up windows and had a basic stereo. They had to get it from a fleet oriented dealer but it took all of a day so they are out there. They could have gotten a stick but I tow a camper with it so auto was the only option I wanted.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      The base 4.2 radio is not a touchscreen. The backup camera and EZ tailgate are also not standard on all trims.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Are you sure? That’s a massive LCD screen to not have touch capabilities.

        *Regardless it adds cost in an unnecessary way.*

        From what I was seeing the two lots I went to had reverse cameras and easy down on all trucks including their fleet sections.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          Here’s how the 4.2in radio works. It looks like a touch screen, but it isn’t:

          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=otUyXs-9y6s

          According to the order guide, the back-up camera and EZ tailgate aren’t even available on the base WT trims, so I’m not sure what was with the trucks you were looking at.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      No backup camera?

      Yeah, well… I take it you never have a big truck in a parking lot, *with cargo in the bed blocking your view back*? That’s nearly the only way I ever drive my truck, so… I’ll keep my aftermarket backup camera.

      Because a backup camera is a *lot* cheaper – and a lot less hassle – than hitting a suicidal pedestrian or smacking a few other cars.

      You don’t have to be a “terrible driver” to realize that not being able to see a good car length behind you, in a parking lot full of pedestrians and idiots, is *bad*.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        Anytime your hooking up to something too heavy to move by hand those backup cameras are the cats meow. Especially when ypur coming at the trailer tongue from an angle. Love it on our Tahoe, wish I had it on my Sierra.

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      Well with a 29″ inseam and the company golf team nickname of oompa-loompa”; I’d like me some bumper steps.

  • avatar
    Fordson

    “Let’s review GM’s strategy: Introduce all new trucks that look exactly like the old trucks they replaced, then RAISE the prices while competitors have huge rebates on their trucks.”

    This. Why did they introduce a truck that you have to check the VIN to tell it’s the new one?

    • 0 avatar
      brettc

      I can tell because of the different headlights (there’s LEDs and sh1t), but I’ll never buy a pickup when I can rent one for the one time per year that I might need one. So they won’t sell me anything anyway. For all the others that can’t tell the difference, GM better prep for the toe tag fire sale to start moving some units.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        No doubt there will be HUGE sales at the end of this model year, equaling or even surpassing those of the 2013 model year, of which there are still tons unsold, parked in the Southwestern desert.

        I’ve got an idea! Let’s use them for foreign aid and give them to undeveloped countries in Africa.

  • avatar
    mcarr

    The problem with GM’s new trucks is that they make the old trucks look really good. Especially for the ’13′s which you could get for well under $30k. To me, the new trucks are nice, but they’re only an incremental improvement over the last model. Maybe in a couple years after the 6.2L and 8-speed comes out there will be enough of an incentive to buy. Also, by then, the big rebates will have kicked in.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    It’s the same old story with GM truck inventory.

    Inventory was at 140 days a year ago:
    http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/08/chart-of-the-day-gm-full-size-truck-inventory-12010-82012/

    It’s tough to run a smooth operation when you routinely overstock, then give them away later in ‘best deal of the year’ blowouts.

    • 0 avatar

      You missed the part where GM actually came out ahead by building up truck inventory.

      “Analysts worried that GM would dump lots of cash on the hood. The issue came to a head in December, when GM said its dealers were sitting on a 139-day supply of Chevrolet Silverados and GMC Sierras.
      Fast-forward to last week. GM said its supply of full-sized pickups was down to 86 days — still robust but not unwieldy, given the circumstances — at the end of June. In fact, GM execs were asked during a conference call whether dealers have enough outgoing ’13 models to meet demand through the fall, when the pipeline of redesigned ’14s is expected to be full. As the economy improved, GM easily moved the high stocks, and without big discounts. Average transaction prices for GM’s pickups in June were $1,300 higher than they were a year earlier. ”

      http://www.autonews.com/article/20130708/OEM/307089974/sweet-vindication-for-gms-pickup-planners#ixzz2iTiLcYkN

      It looks like they misread the market now and underestimated how much Ford and Ram would discount their trucks. Not the end of the world. Discounts are down 35% and sales are only down 8%. Part of the 8% was due to memorial day falling in August plus September 2013 had one less selling day. GM held the line on pricing and made $3000 more per truck sale. The same people would be complaining if they had boosted incentives to keep up with Ford. If inventories rise too high then they will increase discounts to clear them out. Its called adapting to market conditions. It is better to throw discounts when inventories rise, rather than do it all the time. It will work itself out with upcoming shutdowns in Dec and January.

  • avatar
    Higheriq

    The manufacturer sets the sticker price, but the DEALERS set the ACTUAL price. What are they upset about?

    • 0 avatar
      whynot

      Dealers don’t get the cars for free, they have to pay for them. A higher MSRP suggests a higher invoice price meaning to compete the Chevy dealers have to lose more/earn less money than their competitors. Especially if the competitor’s large incentives are supported by the manufacturer. Dealers, like any business, want to earn money.

      • 0 avatar
        Higheriq

        I realize all of that, but the margins on pickups are large enough to justify higher discounts. The dealers simply don’t want to give up discounts. A higher MRSP suggests a higher invoice (your words, not mine) – suggests? Then there’s the matter of holdback, factory to dealer incentives (which might be passed to the customer), etc. I have little sympathy for dealers as they have plenty of opportunity to make money, and not just by strictly selling new cars (used car sales, service, finance interest rate margins, body shops, extended warranties, etc.).

        • 0 avatar
          Kenmore

          shhhh…. don’t wake Ruggles.

        • 0 avatar
          whynot

          Be careful – the margins on pickups are large for the manufacturer. For the dealer? I don’t know but GM (or any other car company) is definitely going to make sure the lion share of the margin goes to them and not the dealer with the invoice price. The dealers clearly want more help from the GM though, so it sounds like they feel they cannot currently compete with Ford/Ram without losing significant money on sales. Yes, dealerships often make most of their profits from other things such as the service center (used car sales can also be pretty low margin like new cars, it depends on the car and condition)but that doesn’t mean they want or should just accept losses selling cars.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Used car margins can be surprisingly high depending on the model (or at least they could be prior to the collapse). It was the same principle as real estate, all you had to do was have working knowledge of the most the banks would finance (or of the models banks like to finance) and price accordingly. The biggest profit I can think of was in 2006, it was an 03 or 04 Explorer Eddie Bauer edition with slightly above avg miles for the time (50Kish) but I know it also had something seriously wrong with it that was concealed (like an early engine replacement or an accident and it should have been R-title or something). Bob paid in the 7s for it (something odd like 72 plus the wholesaler’s fee) and listed it at 15 or 15,900, he eventually sold it for 12 cash plus tax. The only reason I remember this is because one day after coming back from Manheim I observed the smiling old Bob sitting behind a stack of cash and he bragged to his son (who was with me) that he sold the silver Explorer for 12. His son told me later the biggest margin he was aware of the business making was 7K once on a loaded Japanese SUV either a Infiniti or a Pathfinder.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      If the MSRP is increased, you can be sure that the invoice price has been increased by a similar percentage.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    It appears fan boi’sm of a product isn’t as rampant as some would like you to believe.

    GM also had a $hitload of pickups at the end of last year and the beginning of this year to move. New products don’t just provide for success,the products it appears have to be priced correctly.

    Also, as I’ve alluded to many times, I think GM still has some of that old school Detroit mentality, ‘for every vehicle we sell takes a sale from someone else’. They should start looking at profit and not most vehicle sold.

    Prices on pickups in the US will have to increase to make up for the ‘new’ technologies. This is the future.

    This really shows how price sensitive sales of vehicles are. Cheaper will always sell, especially when someone perceives a product as similar, that’s why China and other countries are selling.

    If GM has problems selling and competing, the US can have a internal chicken tax of 25% on Ford and Fiat/Ram pickups. That would make it fair for Chev pickups.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      OK BAF0, what’s REALLY gotcha so P!$$ED about US trucks, especially those evil Tundras and Titans? Out with it… Consider us your support group.

      Sorry, we love our full-size trucks passionately. Always have. The only thing they’re “protected” by is DESIRE, BABY!!!

      You can do another, cut-throat, ’80s style, mini-truck craze/fad/invasion, but it’ll only harm car/SUV/wagon/crossover sales.

      I think it’s that they represent all that’s “American”, which is your #1, primary hate. And your welcome to it, but let’s call it what it is. But do you spend the rest of your time trolling hamburger, hotdog and apple pie articles/sites?

      • 0 avatar
        Kenmore

        Well said, you!

        I’m the wimpiest American on this website but, goddamn, don’t be trash-talking our trucks.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        @DiM,
        If you keep it up I’ll have to infer you might be from Nth Korea with some of the crap you come up with, inventive stuff,eh.

        Who stated I don’t like your pickups? Did I allude to it?

        Most on this site realise comprehension isn’t your forte, so I’ll make it simpler 3 grade standard.

        1. If General Motors can’t compete (play) against Ford and Fiat handicap (beat them up) them with a tax (steal their pocket money) to increase the cost of Ford’s and Fiat’s pickups.

        2. I didn’t even mention midsizers???????? Wow, you need help.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          @BAF0 – You didn’t need to bring “midsizers”. But you do have to bring up the “Chicken Tax”, every frack’n time there’s even a slight mention of US full-size trucks. Obviously there’s no global “fullsizers” to “protect” US full-size trucks from (including Titan and Tundra}. We can do the “midsizers” math. And you’ve made it abundantly clear who’s the Godfather of the Midsizer Mafia…

          On a bad year, there’s over a million new full-size pickup sales. Over 2 million on a good year. And you have it all up in your head that global midsizers are denied access to that pot of gold. And that global midsizers, especially junk from Mahindra, Proton, Ssangyong, etc, would compete head to head with US full-size pickups. As usual, Delusional on all counts.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    The 5.3-liter V8 is in short supply.

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-09-29/gm-said-to-have-limited-supply-of-most-popular-v-8-pickup.html

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/cars/2013/10/02/gm-general-motors-chevrolet-silverado-gmc-sierra-shortage-v-8-v-6/2904761/

    It sounds as if GM is building V6 models to compensate for the V8 shortage. But customers prefer the V8.

    In the full-size truck segment, base motors tend not to be popular. GM needs V8s in order to compete, and it doesn’t have enough of them.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @Pch101
      I actually agree with most of what you have stated about the shortage of V8s.

      But there might be some underlying problems. Last months (September) trend in pickup sales has wound back across all manufacturers.

      I would even discount some of the figure and interpretations for October’s pickup sales numbers, due to the circus in Washington.

      But if sales wind back some more you might even see some more negative growth on certain pickup models.

      But, if November comes in with reducing growth, as well as this month that might be a concern. Sales would near on the same or slightly less than 12 months ago.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    @Hummer – everyone is going to be using EPS in 1/2 ton trucks. IIRC, Ford has kept hydraulic PS with the 6.2 powered trucks.

    Backup camera’s and sensors will most likely become a mandated safety feature. My SuperCrew XLT 6.5 box truck came with a backup camera/sensors and it and it is worth it. I was backing into a parking stall and a small car snuck in behind me. My side mirrors missed it. The camera didn’t. Same can be said for backing out of a stall with a large vehicle next to you. Once the tailgate peeks out, you can see what is coming.
    The only negative to the system is when driving on muddy gravel roads or through snow. Aerodynamic backdrafts will coat the camera lense and bumper sensors with snow and/or mud and then you can’t see out of it or will cause the sensors to false alarm.
    There are other “non-truck” features that are very handy like heated mirrors. Actually – commercial tractors have had heated mirrors since the 70′s.

    GMC needs to make up its mind. Do they compete based on volume or based on profits. I’m sure that GMC will cave in and turn to competing on volume. They need to figure out how to find the right ballance between volume and price.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @Lou_BC
      I think you are correct about GMC. Does GMC have enough independence from General Motors itself to call the shots?

      General Motors seems to be preoccupied with volume rather than profit. That to me seems to be old school Detroit thinking.

      Well, if things keep on going the way they have been for the General Motors full size pickups hopefully the new Colorado/Canyon will be a winner. A diesel in the midsizers would be a bonus as well.

  • avatar
    thelaine

    “Does GMC have enough independence from General Motors itself to call the shots?”

    I’m going to go with “no” on that one. Emphatically. You must be joking.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @thelaine
      I was joking. Sorry if you took it seriously :-)

      Looking at this new pickup whether in Chev or GMC guise it shows that GM has less money to invest into product development. Or full size trucks are coming towards the end of their current life cycle and bigger changes are coming (CAFE?).

      General Motors is trying to improve their car lineup. They figure pickups are earning enough to warrant less investment.

      Even the new global Colorado developed in Brazil was skimpier than what VW and Ford/Mazda invested into their global pickups. The difference in the vehicles show.

      The new Colorado is an acceptable product, but not as competitive as the Ranger/BT50/Amarok. If Toyota do the same with the Hilux as the Tundra with a small investment into development, the Hilux has seen its best days.

      GM didn’t start out with a great platform to develop and now they are behind the 8 ball. Next time even further.

      GM is dying a very slow death. When they go broke I hope Ford buys them out and not an overseas company ;)

      • 0 avatar
        thelaine

        Well shame on me Big Al. A taste of my own medicine. I often make what I consider to be the most obviously sarcastic comment, only to have soneone, to my utter amazement, take it dead seriously. You got me. I will quietly stand down and block this from my memory.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I know that Ford is dealing hard. A friend of my Brother-in-law was trying to deal on trucks. He’s worked long and hard as an electrician and he’s finally ready to replace an old Dodge that he’s had for nearly 10 years. The Dodge was basic but now he’s “treating” himself.

    The Ford dealer is willing to knock $9,000 of a crew cab 4×4 F150 with ecobost V6 and every interior option available. It looks like its going to be his next truck, while the old one hangs around to take abuse.

  • avatar
    nrd515

    When a friend of mine went truck shopping to replace his driven to death 99 Sierra 4×4 ext cab shortbed, he drove all three, the Ram, the F150, and the new Sierra. He found 2 pretty much identical trucks of each make, and started emailing the dealers for prices, etc. Right away, the Sierra was out of the running. Both dealers wanted a couple of thousand more than a similar Ram or F150. He called up a local Chevy dealer to see what they would do on a Silverado, and the price was identical to what one of the others wanted for the Sierra. So it went down to the Ram and F150, and he bought the Ram, for a couple reasons:

    1. He liked the looks of it the best.
    2. The hemi and 8 speed works great, and greatly preferred it over the Ecoboost. He said the Ram and Sierra with the 5.3 was a toss up, performance wise.
    3. He got over $9500 off the sticker. The best the Ford dealers would do is about $8700. The dealer letting him take a Ram for an overnight test drive didn’t hurt either. The Ford dealer went with him for 20 minutes and pissed him off by nagging him to head back to the lot.

  • avatar
    thelaine

    Well shame on me Big Al. A taste of my own medicine. I often make what I consider to be the most obviously sarcastic comment, only to have soneone, to my utter amazement, take it dead seriously. You got me. I will quietly stand down and block this from my memory.

  • avatar
    IronEagle

    Down south here in GA we are seeing $13,000 off of new F150 3.7, 5.0 and EcoBoosts with a trade in. $14,000 off MSRP done deal if you are also leasing a competitive brand (non Ford) product. Just amazing.


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