By on October 29, 2013

Wagons

Juan Barnett of DCAutoGeek has compiled the definitive infographic on our favorite niche segment: manual wagons.  Using inventory from Cars.com, Barnett found that of 2.4 million new cars current available for sale in America, just 2,336 or 0.09 percent are manual wagons. Subaru, followed by Volkswagen, are the big players in this very small market. BMW is sadly absent from this list, now that the 328i wagon can no longer be had with a stick, but Kia (the Soul is technically a wagon), Scion (ditto their two-box offerings) and Mini still make the cut, according to the government’s definition of a wagon. Who would have thought that Cadillac would replace BMW in these rankings?

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93 Comments on “Manual Wagons Total 0.0956% Of All New Cars On Sale: Cadillac Offers One, BMW Doesn’t...”


  • avatar
    VoGo

    RWD?
    Brown?
    Panther-based?

  • avatar
    morbo

    But are they available in brown?

    On a tangential note, been looking at early/mid 90’s Caprice/Roadmaster wagons. I do love the idea of a wagon bigger than a Tahoe or Expedition.

  • avatar
    racer-esq.

    Cars.com dealer listings are incredibly sloppy regarding listing the correct transmission.

    Subaru is killing in this segment.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Using the gov’t definition skews the data, Soul, xB, and Minis are in no way station wagons. So really you’re down to Subaru, Mazda, and VW of NA… Volvo offering a manual in their upcoming pseudo-wagon?

  • avatar
    NormSV650

    i love my 2004 Saab wagon that is tweaked to around 300 horsepower with much more torque. Though is no CTS-V wagon it does haul more inside and has higher tow rating but can see 38 mpg when empty on the highway. It doesn’t hold much more than the sedan version but does have bigger square box consumption. At 3,700 lbs my 3;300 Buick Encore runs rings around it for running errands and quick jaunts. The CUV sits up higher and is easier on older bones to get in and out.

  • avatar
    davefromcalgary

    Do they (cars.com I guess) consider the Outback a wagon? Most people I talk to who aren’t interested in cars refer to the Outback an “SUV”, but we all know its a wagon with a lift kit.

    • 0 avatar
      cirats

      I thought all SUVs were wagons with lift kits (or at least all CUVs, but is there a difference any more, except with respect to a couple of specific models that remain truck-based?).

      • 0 avatar
        davefromcalgary

        Well, I view most CUVs as hatchbacks with lift kits. The Outback/Legacy has that longer “wagon” shape….

        Semantics, amiright?

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          Crossovers really straddle the fence between actually being crossovers and being wagons or hatchbacks these days. I fail to see how any of the new subcompact CUVs (Juke, Countryman, 500L, Encore) are anything more than lifted hatcbacks. Subaru actually went as far *as* to literally lift the Imprezza and call it a wagon. Even more-serious crossovers like the new Escape and the CX-5 strike me as being remarkably similar to hatchbacks. And of course the Outback is a wagon that’s been raised into the air. And while we’re at it, GM’s Lambda crossovers are remarkably-similar to minivans in terms of styling, shape and function.

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      For what it’s worth, autotrader.ca seems to classify the Outback as a passenger car (so, a wagon), while the Forester is an SUV.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Does the Flex sit low enough to be considered a wagon? Its Lincoln counterpart certainly doesn’t…

  • avatar
    golfslave

    When I bought my E46 wagon (manual, sport/premium pgks) there were exactly 4 in the US, and one in the color I wanted. Had to fly out to pick it up. I’m sad there is no worthy successor as I doubt the new 3er (or any newer BMW) will last 177k very trouble free miles. I can’t warm up to the CTS wagons styling, and the rest are FWD, and if I’m going down that road, I may as well get a decent handling CUV.

  • avatar
    vvk

    I would argue that with the demise of Legacy Wagon, which is one of my favorite cars, Subaru no longer offers a station wagon for sale in the US. Outback is a crossover and Impreza is a hatchback.

    Cadillac CTS-V is not a wagon, it’s a hatchback.

    Kia Soul is not a wagon. Scion xB is not a wagon. Mini Clubman is not a wagon. Mazda? What Mazda?!

    The only true wagon I can think of still offered with a manual transmission is VW Jetta.

    • 0 avatar
      eggsalad

      I’ll agree that only the Jetta is a true wagon. I’ll give the Outback a “maybe”, because it blurs the line between wagon and CUV.

      I will also add that I think Subaru’s numbers are skewed low because of supply issues. Subaru is having a banner sales year, and dealers can barely keep them on the lot.

      As for me, I’ve given up on the manual wagon. Right now, I’m torn between the CX-5 and the Patriot. They’re the only two 2WD CUVs that can be had with a stick. The Patriot is quite a bit cheaper, but I think the CX-5 is a much better vehicle, and likely worth the price difference.

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      “Cadillac CTS-V is not a wagon, it’s a hatchback.”

      By what definition? While the roofline does descend a bit toward the glass, it’s a very gentle slope and the rear window glass is more vertical than horizontal. I’ve owned a couple of actual hatchbacks and they could not carry what my CTS wagon can carry. It’s a wagon by any modern definition of that term.

      • 0 avatar
        vvk

        SAAB 900 was clearly a hatch and you could fit your living room in it.

        Hatchbacks are not necessarily less cargo-capable than wagons. But you may be right, it might be a wagon, depending on how you define it.

        • 0 avatar
          FuzzyPlushroom

          I drive a 900, albeit an Opel-based NG900 rather than a classic model, and I’ve had two Volvo wagons in the past – a 740 and an 850.

          The 740 once carried a twin mattress and box spring with the hatch closed. Sure, any mid- to full-size station wagon with space utilisation that’s worth a damn can pull off that trick – I’ve done the same in a Sable – but few of them use the space in the rear of the car as well as that Volvo did. The 850 wasn’t bad, either, and it was the size of my 900, while the 740 was a bit bigger.

          Anyway, the 900 can’t quite do that, I’m pretty sure – although it will accommodate two desktop computers, a Buick Roadmaster driver’s seat (bucket style with console), an upright vacuum, and a few cases of drinks with plenty of room to spare. That’s all I really need a car to do, after all.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “although it will accommodate two desktop computers, a Buick Roadmaster driver’s seat (bucket style with console), an upright vacuum, and a few cases of drinks with plenty of room to spare.”

            Fuzzy did you steal my car because that’s what was in mine yesterday. :)

            Seriously though car bucket seats from the yard, discarded computers, cases of beer, these are the things I’ve carried.

      • 0 avatar
        redav

        I find it best to think of cars existing on a spectrum between true hatches and true wagons.

        A 100% wagon is as long as the sedan, has a full-sized third window (or rather, the space for one), and a generally vertical back window.
        A 100% hatch is shorter than the sedan, follows the same profile as the sedan (i.e., no third window and the back window is heavily slanted).

        The CTS-V wagon looks to be at least 90% wagon.
        The old Mazda3 would be ~70% wagon (it’s shorter than the sedan, doesn’t have space for a full third window, but still vertical enough back end).
        The new Mazda3 is nearly 100% hatch.

    • 0 avatar
      IndianaDriver

      How can you not see the Subaru Outback as a station wagon!!!

      • 0 avatar
        vvk

        > How can you not see the Subaru Outback as a station wagon!!!

        As a way of punishment for dropping Legacy Wagon!

        Grrrr!

        Seriously, have you driven one? It drives like a crossover.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    We recently took a 2014 Patriot into our fleet, does that count? You guessed it, AWD/4×4, manual transmission and believe it or not, it was accidentally ordered in rugged brown. Luckily I caught that mistake in time and changed it to true blue. Keepin it real TTAC style.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      Patriot is available with 4wd and stick? Not to my knowledge!

      • 0 avatar
        Silvy_nonsense

        The less knowledge I have about the Patriot the better. That being said, even I know the 2014 Jeep Patriot Sport 4×4 comes standard with a 5-speed manual transmission. The CVT and the 6-speed automatic are $1,200 options.

        • 0 avatar

          Well the surprise comes from the understanding that the tranny and the diff on such cars are in one casing and therefore you must have a hypoid gear and driveshaft outlet in there somewhere — a proposition more easily found on autos. The maual would need to be sourced from an unusual source, like a Mitsubishi… OOOOOH WAIT

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Woah no way! Went on the jeep website and sure enough, 5spd manual with the 4×4 option. Call me crazy but I actually like the things. Cheap and utilitarian, I’m only put off by the bad visibility due to the chunky pillars and the small cargo space. A 5spd with 4wd is truly a unicorn for those, I’ve never seen one on cars.com that wasn’t a base fwd dealer bait and switch loss leader.

  • avatar
    Jesse

    I drove my 4-cyl, manual, RWD wagon to work today (as I do most days).

    It’s a ’90 Volvo 245DL.

    If Volvo still made a car like that, I’d consider buying a new one.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Volvo wouldn’t have been sold twice if they still built a vehicle of that caliber.

      • 0 avatar
        Landcrusher

        Exactly.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          The sad part is the S80 was developed prior to the Ford takeover in 1999. Many aficionados point at Ford for the mess Volvo became but the brand lost its way long before. Disposable rich people toys only have so much of a market and too many players on the field for Volvo to continue pulling it off. Hopefully Geely will see the light and build something like a 200/700 again but I won’t hold my breath.

          If there’s one quirky automotive brand Apple should buy its not Tesla, its Volvo, and use it to showcase their supposed expert engineering. A good chunk of their customer base will never even ride in a Tesla much less own one, but Volvo could put out plenty of Chinese built S40 type vehicles for double what they are worth packed to the brim with Apple plastic fantastic junk.

          • 0 avatar
            Jesse

            The 850 was too. During the 80’s. Ford didn’t force them to go FWD. That was a decision that they made on their own because everyone else was (Toyota long before, Peugeot, the domestics, etc).

            The 850 wasn’t really a bad/unreliable car either. Nothing like the horror shows of the early 00’s.

            It’s too bad Volvo shot for some of BMW’s pie, but made cars like they were shooting for Toyota’s pie.

          • 0 avatar
            Ryoku75

            I have a theory behind why Volvos quality dropped in the 90’s:

            In the mid-90’s Toyotas Camry was selling like hotcakes and was generally perceived as being a more modern and reliable alternative to Volvos odd boxy offerings, so to compete Volvo had to increase standard features while sacrificing overall quality.

            So the end result were cars that lacked longevity but lasted just long enough to appeal to the “finance for 2 years and trade in” crowd, but customers still wanted more aero-ish cars over the classy boxes that Volvo built.

            At least thats my guess but I could be completely wrong.

            A Volvo 850 may not get 400k miles, but I’ve seen a sizable amount of 200k+ examples in a junkyard I frequent.

          • 0 avatar
            Ryoku75

            Didn’t the fwd S80 make its way into Ford 500, which became the new Taurus?

            I find it a weird coincidence that both the 500 and S80 were made to replace the 900 based S80’s and Panthers.

            I do know that the RWD S80 was a cheapened clunker though, at least from what I’ve read with past comments.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @Jesse

            Correct, they were deliberately phasing out RWD, so the 700 essentially became the 900 series and it was never replaced when it was discontinued in 1998.

            @Ryoku

            You are probably correct, after all the early 940 looks like an attempt to build an “aero” car out of the existing 700 platform. Later when the 940 was dropped the 900 continued as the restyled six cylinder 960 and finally as S90. The 850/S70 is certainly not a bad car but I think history will judge it harshly, it was the first Volvo that really wasn’t a Volvo. There’s actually a 940 available to me now with alot of peeling paint [?] but I think he wants alot for it and my 240 was just so much car for the roughly same money.

            The Ford Five Hundred as far as I know is a de-contented S80. I’ve read the reason Ford wanted Volvo was because of the S80 architecture which they could use in FoMoCo lines in order to increase crash test ratings without doing it themselves. The current Taurus may or may not be related I’m not really sure.

            RWD S80?

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        I meant RWD S90, there was no rwd S80 so I was a bit confused there.

        When car shopping it was really just 900’s and Panthers for me, the 240 is a bit better in styling but the 900 could be had newer and with less electrical bugs. I dunno how good they really are, but I do know that someone said that the S90 has wind noise on par with 240’s and more interior rattles.

        From what I know the new Taurus’s use the S80’s platform, just with modern compromises like green houses.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I know of several S90s all in the 150-200K range, I can’t speak mechanically but aside from cracking leather they all look pretty good. From a durability standpoint the redblock blows away the I6, but 960/S90s make decent swap candidates from what I have seen. I toy with 960 swap myself because the car is so much newer, the I6 isn’t beloved, and any decent 200/700 I find will be worth keeping with the redblock. If there was a way I could barter for this 940 I would but its nothing special with auto, leather, and peeling paint. Now if it were a manual…

          The new Taurus is a compromised S80? Aside from excellent drive-ability I’ve not heard one good thing about it. The Five Hundred I’ve heard is nice save for the lo-po 3.0 prior to the redesign as “Taurus” where they added the 3.5.

          • 0 avatar
            Ryoku75

            That 940 would be a decent back-up for your 240, nothing special but it beats having to get a rental.

            Sticks are hard to come by with Volvos so you may have to swap one in if you’re serious, with the terrible drivers in my area I had to buy an automatic.

            With VTEC, smooth quiet 4’s and tame v6’s being all the rage of the mid-90’s I don’t think that there was really any room for the crude redblock if I’m honest. As crummy as my old Tercel was, the engine was much smoother and quiet than my ’92 240.

            But then again the redblock has more personality than whatever Toyota dropped into their Tercels.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I just put a transmission in my beater Saturn, so in theory it backs up the 240 and I have no need for this 940 other than I keep wanting to fill up my bldg’s parking spaces. If I still had direct access to a fully functional dealership, I would buy the 940 tomorrow and put a dealer plate on it like the old days… but when your a civilian nobody they ding you on insurance, registration, inspection, endless BS (virtually every car State Farm insures seems to run a min of 350 a year, my Saturn or this 940 might be worth that in scrap). I don’t mind it as much for cars of actual value or ones I plan to keep for a length of time, but cheap toys I only want to drive for a little while for the hell of it, it gets annoying and expensive. If I one day did a 960 swap for a Ford 302 or my dream, an LSx, it would be a car I’d plan to baby like the Grand Prix and 240 so it would be well worth the red ink expense.

            Additional, there was a very clean ’94 940 about three hours from here that went for something like $1600 on Ebay. I’m not sure what my guy wants out of his peeling paint one, but knowing him as I do its going to be that much or more. Maybe I’ll ask to take it for a test drive to get it out of my system because I’m sure I’ll miss the 70s simple ergonomics of my 244.

          • 0 avatar
            Ryoku75

            I say to go for a test run, that way you can can figure out which cars the best to drive between a 240 and a 940. I enjoyed the 900’s odd door handles and design, but the head room could’ve been better compared to a 240.

            You’ll enjoy the extra width of the 900’s interior but I don’t think that you’ll like its 60-40 weight distribution, coming from your 245’s 50-50.

            “insurance, registration, inspection, endless BS”

            Another reason millenials aren’t buying cars, just getting one legalized is a huge pain in the foot.

          • 0 avatar
            Ryoku75

            Thanks, I’m not one to preach Top Gear dogma but I’ve had enough experience with Asian cars to say that they’re generally great commuters, but Honda NSX-aside, forgettable, this includes the legendary AE86 and “let the car do all the work” GTR’s.

            Oui, I was wrong its not tie rods but the steering shafts, they can corrode and cause newer Panthers to loose control. This has happened with numerous police models already.

        • 0 avatar
          jconli1

          The aluminum I6 had a rough start in the early 960s, but was pretty well sorted out by ’95. Smoooooth power, and very torquey compared to the unboosted redblock in the standard 940s. I had been looking for a 940 turbo with a manual when I found a great deal on a last-year V90. Total dream, except for their being auto-only… felt surprisingly similar to my dad’s ’00 Grand Marq. It was black, and quickly developed the name, “The Swedish Panther.”

          But my first is the one I will forever kick myself for letting go : a silver, manual, intercooled ’83 245 turbo. Had it in college and while I knew it was pretty special, I didn’t think it all the way through when I traded it across for an ’89 Swift GTi (though that was special in its own way).

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I wasn’t aware the V90 could even be had in an I4 I would have assumed all of the 900s were the I6 by the end. An acquaintance at work just acquired an ’83 242 Turbo that he’s been hooning so I can imagine what you gave up.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        “Volvo wouldn’t have been sold twice if they still built a vehicle of that caliber.”

        That is absolutely true, because they would have gone out of business in about 1993.

        240s are charming antiques, and I love them dearly, but get real kids, they are a mid 1960s design!

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Very true it was time for 240 to die, but the direction they took after it put them in a path that lead them into being sold twice. If they still sold cars like the 200/700 series I think they would have a larger and much more loyal following. Every European marque wlll sell you a car that starts falling apart at 70K, what happens if Volvo went back to the age where every car was designed to last 19.6 years? The brand has nowhere to go but up and given their current product I don’t see much further growth in North America (China/India is another story).

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            Volvo (and Saab, Acura, and Lincoln, and to a lesser amount Infiniti) all have the same problem. They are not quite good enough to play with the Germans, and are too expensive to get any real volume. They can’t go downmarket,, their cost of production is too high. So they have to go UP, and they were just not good enough at it.

            It CAN be done, Audi did it, but they had VWs money to do it with, and the economy of scale sharing platforms with them too. Acura has Honda, and should be able to do it too, but they can’t seem to get it together. And Hondas pockets are simply nothing like as deep as VWs. I think another fundamental issue is that VWs ARE premium cars themselves, if only entry-level premium. Honda makes econoboxes. Ford just doesn’t care enough about Lincoln to spend the money. Infiniti is just kind of a hot mess Japanese imitation of BMW. Toyota mostly succeeded with Lexus, but they still don’t REALLY compete with the Germans, they just make the worlds best Buicks.

            I simply don’t buy into this whole “European cars fall apart” crap, because I have owned too many of them with WAY too many miles on them to think it is anything but a pile of crap. There was a time period going on 15-20 years ago where the Germans HAD to cut costs, and they did not do a great job of it. But those days are past, and even those cars last a darned long time if you maintain them correctly. What gets forgotten when talking about Volvos lasting 20 years is that there was PLENTY of money spent on them along the way. The list of common stuff that goes wrong with 240s is as long as my arm. Yeah, they are a little simpler than a same year BMW, but ultimately I think demographics had a lot more to do with it than engineering. They average new 240 buyer was a heck of a lot easier on the car than the average new 3-series buyer.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I really like your last point, comparing any NA redblocked Volvo to its BMW or Mercedes equivalent of the period isn’t a direct comparison based on the demographic that buys them in first place (or CPO).

            The one brand I was surprised to see you left out was Subaru. Granted Subaru isn’t in a poor position and had a parent with deep pockets even before Toyota acquired a piece, but this is a niche brand like Volvo, who has been specializing in AWD systems since 1972 and then chooses to offer a boxer layout in conventional passenger car and offers manuals up the wazoo. On the surface it sounds like a brand dreamt up by the brown diesel wagon owners at TTAC, yet despite some of the annoying issues that come up with Subarus (ie head gasket issues) ordinary people seem to genuinely love the cars the way Volvo aficionados love their old bricks. Do ordinary Volvo owners today feel that way about their cars? In my company I know four Volvo owners of the eight or so I see parked regularly not including mine, of those four, two drive 04+ S60s, one a newer (or new) XC90, and one a V70. The XC90 owner said she had owned one previously and bought the original one to keep her then much younger children safe, and traded for the current one. She didn’t really seem to care much about what she drove, shes a low-level executive and I imagine would buy any car in a certain price range that is justified by her salary. The V70 owner bought his used for AWD but is frustrated with it, one S60 owner bought new because he liked the look of the car but didn’t plan to buy another not caring for the new one. The only owner I’ve met of those four who loves their car is the S60 owner who bought used but also recently acquired the 242 Turbo I’ve posted about, so he’s more in the “car guy” camp. So if Subaru can get ordinary people in love with their cars, Volvo would be wise to look into doing that with its customers, high costs or not.

            Night

        • 0 avatar
          Ryoku75

          Really any car owned for 20 years is going to require a bit more money than the initial asking price. Its why I suggest for people to buy the cars that they want rather than “whatevers reliable”, and to maintain the things.

          I don’t buy into the whole “European cars fall apart” argument myself, save for late 90’s-00’s VWs and a few other German makes, most European cars are reasonably reliable,
          they’re no different than Japanese makes save for the fact that European cars often feel a bit special while Japanese cars are as saturated and derivative as their look-alike anime.

          In fact I’ll just say this, considering the numerous recalls the Panther platform had I’d sooner trust my daily commute in an 80’s Alfa than a manifold leaking, tie rod breaking, interior disintegrating, de-contended Crown Vic.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Excellent point Euro marques always did feel a little more special to me than their Toyonda counterparts.

            Tie rod breaking? That’s a new one on me.

  • avatar
    mars3941

    Manual transmission in any Cadillac is the kiss of death.

    • 0 avatar
      imag

      Why? It’s a Tremec unit, which is a pretty good transmission.

      • 0 avatar
        redav

        Buying demographic.

        Despite all their efforts to be “red-blooded American luxury” (I’m not sure what that means, but let’s suppose it means “American BMW”), the people who buy Caddies and other luxury cars aren’t doing it to be ‘connected’ with the driving experience. They buy them to be detatched from that experience, hence Lexus and BMW moving away from their roots.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Which is why I can’t understand what happened to Cadillac. You can build a real Cadillac-like car that isn’t an aircraft carrier or screams octogenarian, but instead they go the BMW tight driving “feel the pavement” route with cubist styling only a Picasso fan can love.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          How has Lexus moved away from their roots?? They make rolling couches, and they have always made rolling couches.

          BMW has ALWAYS had a split personality. They made fun zippy little 2002s and e30s, but they also made boat-like Bavarias, and 3.0s, 7’s and such sporting delights as the 3spd automatic 528e that my Mom had. That car was a German Buick. It’s all relative anyway, the current 3-series may be a little bigger and a little softer, but if you want that modern e30 feeling buy a 1-series or now a 2-series coupe. The 1 is the new 3, the 3 is the new 5, etc.

          If BMW still made nothing but 2002s they would be out of business, because no one would buy them.

          Cadillac had to start over, their traditional buyers all moved to Boca and died. BMW has a successful recipe, so they have fairly successfully copied it. I literally know no one my age who wants an isolating couch ride of a car, but I live in New England so maybe that is part of it. Personally, while I will never say the current Cadillac style is pretty, I admire them for doing their own thing and not looking like every other car on the road, most of which seem to try to look like BMWs too.

  • avatar

    It is the end of times.

  • avatar
    deanst

    As a 5-speed Mazda5 driver, does this mean i’m now a member of the 0.1%?

  • avatar
    gottacook

    I consider any Subaru without a trunk to be a wagon – and with those sales numbers, the infographic must be doing so as well; that is, they’re likely counting manual Impreza 5-doors and Crosstreks as wagons.

    If those aren’t counted, I don’t see how the numbers could be very high, with SoA continuing to reduce its stick-shift offerings year to year. For example, the 2014 Forester offers a stick only in the base car and in the next level up (Premium), BUT if you get the latter with stick you can’t get the moonroof, which is unavailable in the base car (although a Premium with CVT comes with the moonroof standard). Not long ago, almost any level of a given Subaru model sold in the U.S. could be had with a stick except for 6-cylinder cars and the L.L. Bean Foresters that were offered through ’09.

    We are going to do our level best to keep our two manual Subaru wagons (’03 Legacy SE, ’06 Forester X premium pkg.) going indefinitely, given that there’s no modern-day (U.S. market) substitute.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    It is a crime that Mazda will not sell its new Mazda6 wagon in the US. It is a beautiful vehicle regardless of body style. I loved the last gen Subaru Legacy wagons, but the new ones, while maybe technically a wagon, are more like CUVs. Unfortunately, the Volvo’s Upcoming V60 will be auto only no doubt as they dont currently sell a S60 model with a manual here.

    Very few actual wagons in that list. Bummer

  • avatar
    pacificpom2

    I would have thought that the definition of a wagon would be where the roof line of a sedan has been elongated to a point between the rear wheels and the extremity of the car and a fifth/third door added in place of the trunk/boot lid. A hatch back’s roof would be the equivalent of the normal sedan roof line with a door attached maintaining a slope to the original boot/trunk opening above the rear bumper. Wagons/SUV/CUV is a more of a marketing grey area. Wagon, not lifted unless the sedan is also lifted plus it could also be on a stretched wheelbase. A CUV/SUV is designed with more ground clearance than an equivalent sedan , normally.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    Subaru doesn’t offer a thing that *I* would consider a “wagon”. Nor do KIA or Scion. They sell some reasonably decent CUVs and some nice little hatchbacks though. There are now TWO manual tranny wagons in this country – the Jetta and CTS-V. As usual, the government definitions are simply stupid.

    BMW is most assuredly on my Sh@i list at the moment regarding the available configurations of the 328i and 328d wagons. As I have said on here before, I would have already placed an order for a 328d if I could get one in RWD manual form. And truthfully, the 8spd autobox works so well with the diesel I might just settle for just RWD. AWD and autotragic keeps my wallet safely in pocket just on general principles. No thanks on brown though.

    Note that I say this as the serial owner of multiple manual transmission station wagons, bought brand spanking new, not the typical internet basement dweller…

    • 0 avatar

      I was at the dealer a few weeks back and they had a lovely 328d in an M Sport trim, navy blue with a light interior just how I like it. Sadly, it only had two pedals :(

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Assuming BMW Canada does things like BMWUSA (I know probably a bad assumption), the only way to go is to do Euro Delivery and order one just the way you want one. I assume you could even write off the expenses of the trip, since you would certainly write all about it. Amazing experience, I REALLY want to do it again.

        Euro Delivery here saves you 7-8% off the top, then you can still negotiate from there. I got about $3K off ED MSRP without trying too hard on my car. Call it $6500 off US MSRP. I probably could have done a bit better but I figure the dealer needs to make a living.

        • 0 avatar

          Most people order their cars here – the timing is just not great, especially for Euro Delivery. My brother graduates college next April and it would be a dream to pick up, say, a 228i and meet up with him when he’s backpacking. In any case, I suspect that last 128i 6MT will sit for a while.

    • 0 avatar
      gottacook

      To me the Outback has to be construed as a wagon, because to do otherwise would be to deliberately ignore that it’s a Legacy wagon with taller ride height, as it always has been; Legacy wagons are still offered in other markets (see http://www.subaru.jp/legacy/dit-spec-b).

      Unfortunately I think that even if Subaru of America were to reintroduce the Legacy wagon, no manual would be offered. Not even the Mazda 6 wagon of two generations ago offered a stick (or AWD) in the U.S.

  • avatar
    DGA

    I’ve known people to fly across the country to get their hands on a 2005 Legacy GT wagon with a stick. The only year the row-it-yourself gearbox was available with that engine on the wagon. The wagon went all automatic with the 2.5L turbo in 2006 till they just stopped producing the Legacy wagon for US consumption with the 2008 model year. How sad…I really wanted one.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    *sigh*

    So in other words, in this, or any other lifetime, there will never, EVER, be a GM Zeta platform VF Commodore based LS3 or LSA powered sportwagon with a manual for sale in the United States – because I represent all of maybe 6 people who would buy one.

    *sigh*

  • avatar
    redav

    So, the take rate for manuals in this segment is a bit over 3%.

    That sounds about right.

  • avatar
    Tosh

    My new company will take one TSX sedan manual and one TSX wagon automatic, complete the drivetrain swap, and sell the customer one TSX wagon manual and one sedan automatic for under $100,000. Taking 50% deposits now…

  • avatar
    Jacob

    Too bad Jetta Sportwagen is based on two generations old golf platform and still uses the unloved 2.5L 5-cylinder engine. I hope they update it soon.


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