By on October 28, 2013

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While the all new 2014 Impala is impressing reviewers, like Consumer Reports calling it this year’s highest scoring sedan, General Motors has decided to keep the outgoing Impala as a low cost option for fleet customers until 2016. According to Automotive News, the automaker had originally planned to keep the old Impala, branded the Impala Limited, in production for rental operators as well as government and corporate fleet customers, into next year. “The Impala Limited has done extremely well. Our fleet customers know the car and like it,” a GM spokesman said last week. “It’s a business opportunity that we want to continue to fulfill.”

The continued production of the Impala Limited means that the Oshawa Car Assembly plant in Ontario will remain open until at least 2016.

GM has used the strategy of offering fleet only models, like the Impala Limited and the Chevy Captiva, as a means of both making money from the fleet sales and reducing the chances that those fleet sales will negatively affect resale values and with them consumer loyalty. The car company has also kept outgoing Malibu fleet special models in production side by side with new models. Before the redesign, about two thirds of Impala sales in recent years have been to fleets and the car developed a reputation as a rental special. Chevy is hoping to flip those numbers and more, with a target of 70% retail sales for the Impala brand, improving the model name’s cachet with customers.

Higher transaction prices are what car companies are chasing these days, and the new Impala can cost between $1,000 and $5,000 more than a comparably equipped 2013.

The previous Impala has been in production since 2006. Analysts say that the tooling for that car has been paid for a long time ago so GM can offer it as an inexpensive, high volume fleet model and still make money on it, while not hurting the new model’s residual value.

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84 Comments on “Impala Limited Fleet Special Lives On To At Least 2016, Keeps Oshawa Open...”


  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Oh, thank God this “Standard of Dull” will live on

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      At least the put on a chain link grille to class it up a little for those Enterprise customers.

      Seriously, can’t believe they’re still making this. Though they did it with the “Malibu Classic,” building that heap til what, 05? Way past its sell-by date.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Props to GM for innovation, heck Nissan is going to copy their lead to keep a fleet Rogue in production (although I doubt Rogue will put up volume like W-Impala). The Captiva is still being made so it must be profitable to continue production of outdated models.

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        Yeah, they got eight years out of the 2nd gen N body Malibu. Unfortunately my mom owns one, an ’05 with the Ecotec 2.2.

    • 0 avatar
      Toad

      If this was Ford and the model in question was the Panther there would be a collective TTAC cheer. The Impala Limited is GM’s Panther; outdated and outclassed as a retail vehicle but perfectly suited for fleet work. Some cars truly are appliances, and the Impala Limited fills this need well.

      As an involuntary owner of GM stock (ie taxpayer) I think profitably selling a car that fills a need in the market is a good decision.

      • 0 avatar
        Lt.BrunoStachel

        Funny how there was no mention of the Impala 9C1 carryover model in that Cop Car “battle royale” story from last week or so. 302HP V-6. I think that there makes it better than the old LS4 powered SS models from 06-08.

        +1 on the Panther love>W-Body hate vibe.

    • 0 avatar
      Superdessucke

      I’m cool on keeping it around, but why not rename it the Bel Air or Biscayne? Impala Limited is clumsy and not really correct anyway. Having a reincarnation of one of those two plates would be awesome! I’d even rather it be called the Lumina or Corsica over Impala Limited.

  • avatar
    mikey

    As I see it, this is win, win for everybody. The plant keeps 650 low senior,young people for another 24 months.
    The fleet buyers are getting a bargain. The Impala has proven itself to be both reliable, and comfortable. With the tooling, and development,long since payed for, GM can offer them huge discounts.

    Oh Yeah! last, but not least.

    Zackman’s good taste has been confirmed.

    By offering a “fleet only” vehicle, GM keeps their retail customers happy.

    At the end of the vehicles rental life, these cars are snapped up. A savvy buyer ends up with good,nice looking, reliable car. Cheap parts will be available for years.

    I don’t see a down side.

    • 0 avatar
      doug-g

      This generation of Impala has always been my Panther. I always give one in the right color a second glance and I always request them when I rent. The only reason I don’t currently own one is becauase the lease on my Honda expired too soon for me to get a used 2012 Impala with the improved V6. These were/are nice cars, but not cars you bought new “right off the showroom floor”.

    • 0 avatar
      Zackman

      Mikey, you’re priceless!

      I know my 2012 is considered “outdated” by many, especially the hard-core enthusiasts, but I’m an enthusiast as well, but not necessarily in the rip-roaring speed and high-powered crowd. I love this car!

      However, with 300 horses under the hood, it’ll give a good account of itself whenever I feel like those horses need a little exercise!

      Yes, the exhaust notes are very satisfying.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        I drive what most consider an unenthusist car, (Escape) but I don’t care, I like it, I also drive a 2012 Impala on a regular basis (my father’s) It’s a good car, but it’s a mind-numbing isolation chamber

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Good points Mikey.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      The “down side” is that this pretty much guarantees GM will close Oshawa as soon as the conditions of its Canadian bailout are satisfied, since GM is doing the absolute minimum to keep its Canadian production numbers at the agreed level until that time. It’s a dead plant walking.

    • 0 avatar
      Kevin Kluttz

      Downside: You will be getting a General Motors piece of shit and you will need a LOT of those available parts, as it is with all General Motors pieces of shit. Anyone remember why they went bankrupt? They sold pieces of shit. They still sell pieces of shit to very, very ignorant buy ‘murricun rednecks.

    • 0 avatar
      Acd

      The down side is when I go to the rental car counter one Monday and the only thing they have left is one of these rolling museum pieces from the GM Crappy Car Era. Ughhhh…….

  • avatar
    Omnifan

    Not only do fleet buyers get a bargain, but those of us who buy cheap three year old cars will rejoice as well. I don’t need all of the tech in the new Impala, as much as I like the car. I like savings better.

    • 0 avatar
      jcoll

      where do you all buy used fleet vehicles? I checked a used Impala from Hertz, $11000 for one with 40,000 miles. So I have years now, before I need to pull the trigger. Make mine in white, detective’s special.

  • avatar
    BunkerMan

    Last month I went shopping for a car to replace mine (since my wife refuses to drive stick) and I test drove a 2012 Impala with the 300hp V6. The only thing going for it was the exhaust note when merging onto the highway.

    I then test drove a low mileage 2011 Taurus. It made the Impala seem 20 years old. It was smoother, quieter, had a lot of toys, and had just as much room inside (except for the centre console). It was no contest. I bought the Taurus.

    • 0 avatar
      rpol35

      Interesting perspective as I did the reverse. The Taurus’ circa 1982 torque steer, gun slit windowns and general “thickness” made me feel like I was driving an ill handling brick.

      The Impala, even with its real cheesy, pep boys style seat cover fabric, has to me, a much lighter, airier feel to it, not to mention its very significant standard power. It does have, I’ll admit as one other poster indicated, a rather numbing feel to it but then one doesn’t buy such a car if you’re looking for road manners and handling – sort of like what most business renters are looking for.

      • 0 avatar
        Monty

        Two friends own Impalas – one a really nice LTZ with almost all options, and another owns a LT version. Both have proven to be incredibly reliable, and the LTZ is actually one of the nicest highway cruisers I can recall in several years. Both owners are extremely happy with their cars, and both are not car people, but appreciate the cars for what they are.

        To each their own, as it were. The Impala is not something I would buy, but for some people the Impala is the preferred version of the Avalon class. If I was looking for an Interstate cruiser, a 2012 Impala would be at the top of my list. As I only drive about 3500 miles a year, and its 99% urban and suburban, the Impala is just not an appropriate choice for me.

      • 0 avatar
        chicagoland

        There is no such thing as a “1982 Taurus”.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          I thought of this yesterday, but didn’t say anything. A Taurus in 82, same year as the 5000/100 arrived. Now that would’ve been impressive!

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            Read again guys, he’s saying the current Taurus exhibits torque steer like it’s 1982. Similarly, one would not need to be born in 1999 to party like it’s 1999.

            The GTDI Taurus/MKS does have quite a bit of torque steer under full throttle.

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    Why not sell this alongside the new one, this one Impala, the new one “Caprice”?

    • 0 avatar
      Tomifobia

      Or, leave the Impala name on the new version, and call this one “Biscayne.”

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        +1 on Biscayne. Give me a white one, LS model 16 in rims, no spoiler. Tint the windows a dark as legally permitted. Strip the Impala name off, rename Biscayne, put a push bar on the front, and see how many people dive out of your way in traffic. Get a personalized plate that says “UNOFICL”. :P

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I toyed with a similar idea over the summer, a fleet LS with only a “Limited” emblem and the 00-04 Impala leaping animal on the trunk.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          Since my dad’s Impala is fairly close to the one you describe as was the Grand Marquis that preceded it, I can attest to the behavior of other drivers around these “UNOFICL” white sedans and to the ensuing anger once your poser status is established. I have requested that my father get the following vanity plate…

          “NOTACOP”

  • avatar
    ash78

    The last time I remember them doing this, I was standing at the Enterprise rental counter a few years ago and they said “You’ve got a Chevy Classic” and I was like “huh?”

    “Oh, it’s just the name for their rental Malibu”

    “Sweet, I’ve been looking forward to driving the new Malibu”

    Then I saw the car in all of its white hubcappy goodness. It was a 2000-era Malibu.

    le rage.

    • 0 avatar
      crtfour

      This pretty much happened to me. And to make matters even worse, this was at Budget Car Rental as the St. Louis airport and this was considered a “full size” car.

      Unlike yours, though, mine had alloys on it!

  • avatar

    Probably makes good financial sense after Ford dumped the Crown Vic. The W-body is the last (fleet) man standing?

  • avatar
    Dimwit

    I’m very surprised that more companies don’t do this! VW is famous for having multigenerational versions so that they can hit more price points.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Don’t they do that in China, with that thing based on the Quantum still for sale, used as Taxis? I’ve seen them when I was watching The Amazing Race, but can’t recall the model name.

      They were as ubiquitous as the Crown as taxi in Japan.

      • 0 avatar
        Dimwit

        Santana.

        China is very complicated when it comes to VW. They have two JV partners that have different markets. SAIC is in the big cities and has newer gen designs while FAW is more budget concious and has older generation platforms like the Santana. It will be interesting to see what VW does with the MQB for all their manoeuverings.

  • avatar
    Astigmatism

    “‘The Impala Limited has done extremely well. Our fleet customers know the car and like it,’ a GM spokesman said last week. ‘Of course, our fleet customers’ retail customers know the car and hate it, but what do we care if we make them associate Chevrolet with fifteen-year-old penalty iron? What could possibly go wrong?\'”

    • 0 avatar
      84Cressida

      Thank you. It’s amazing how some people here will defend this thing for being uncompetitive. I work at Enterprise, nobody that rents them goes out of their way to say they enjoyed it, they aren’t fast unless you literally floor it, the seats aren’t supportive, there is no Bluetooth or telescoping wheel, and it drives like a boat.

      • 0 avatar
        mikey

        84Cressida…So I suppose your going to tell us that people, go out of their way to say they enjoyed Camry driving experience.

        • 0 avatar
          NormSV650

          +1 mikey! 84Cresi didn’t get the financial memo.

        • 0 avatar
          Astigmatism

          I rent a fair amount, though not as much as some. As I rent through National, I don’t speak to the rental agents much, but I do choose my own car. Inevitably, as all the other cars get snatched up around them, the last cars in the Emerald Aisle will be three or four sad, lonely Impalas, all next to each other. If that’s all that’s available, I’ll inevitably ask for a free upgrade to whatever’s in Emerald Select, and nobody’s ever said no.

          Whether or not anyone goes out of their way to tell the agent that they liked or hated their car, it can’t be lost on the company that these are like the fat kid who gets chosen last in dodgeball. Can it?

          • 0 avatar
            Lorenzo

            I’ve gotten a string of them flying coast to coast, west to east. By the time I get in, that’s all they have left, but it’s not like those are the only Impalas they have. They just keep extras to give you an automatic upgrade when the compact you wanted got rented out. I’ve gotten used to them, except for the auto-dim rear view mirror that turns black when Venus shines in the back window.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      This. The old Impala is a terrible, terrible car. Suspension that manages to have disconnected handling and a crashy ride at the same time, mouse-fur seats (or leather that feels worse than vinyl), acres of hard plastic on the dashboard, poor noise insulation, worse ergonomics. The only good things about it are the V6 and the big trunk.

      If they are still on rental lots in 2014, let alone 2016, that will do untold damage to Chevy’s image.

  • avatar
    Conslaw

    Are there any sales numbers available for the new and the old Impala? The old Impala has its flaws, but it also has a 20 cubic foot trunk which makes up for a lot of them.

  • avatar

    I’ll second the rename idea. If they really want to improve the cachet of the Impala name they should name the fleet vehicle something completely different. Bel Air? Biscayne? Fleetmaster?

    Rental customers who are not in the know aren’t going to notice that this is an Impala “Limited” and walk away with the idea that the Impala (unlimited) is crap.

  • avatar
    morbo

    Rental grade is still rental grade. I will still avoid this in favor of Chargers and Altima’s whenever possible.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    I’m just glad I rent enough that I usually get upgraded out of this drek. The CTS that Hertz gave me at ATL last week was quite nice.

    A turd with 300hp is just a faster turd, and it won’t outrun its own stink.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    I’m overjoyed to hear this. I test drove and seriously considered a year old 2012 LT when I was car shopping, that exhaust note as you burble around town is fantastic. I know everyone is calling it bland and boring, but I’d argue that this car has character in spades. In an age of crappy sightlines, pedestrian impact standards, autonomous braking systems, the Impala struts out with a 1988 platform. with 1988 era velour seat fabric, fantastically fake burled wood trim, and a beastly direct injected v6 making some sweet sounds. I still get a tinge of regret when I see a black LT on the street, having picked a 2012 Civic with the left side of my brain. Perhaps I’ll pick up a 2016 when they’re at the end of the line.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Freaking W-body…

  • avatar
    Secret Hi5

    I hope these fleet customers are not car rental companies. I’d hate to have to rent an Impala Classic in 2014, 2015, or 2016!

  • avatar
    BTEFan

    Impala Limited is a good idea for a number of reasons. Keep building it until no one wants it.

    1. Tooling is paid off, GM makes lots of money on Impala Limited. Extra cash goes to develop new products that are fun – like Chevrolet SS, new Corvette, Camaro variants etc.

    2. Because its been in fleets for so long, the folks that work on and maintain them know the ins and outs of the older vehicles, and have streamlined the maintenance processes so that they can minimize downtime. The person that drives the car – chances are they are just happy they get a car to use for work.

    3. Regular Impala kept out of fleets should theoretically sell for a higher price and hold their value better come trade in time. New car buyers willing to get another one as their non fleet Impala held its value better.

    4. Rental car companies have a ‘full size’ car that they can buy for cheap, rent for cheap, and dispose of as a great value used car for those folks that just want lots of car for thier dollar.

    5. From what I understand, and I could be wrong, rental car companies don’t really make any money on the car (its on that insurance that they like to sell), but they need cheap cars to rent out at $19.95 a day, because thanks to hotwire and travelocity etc, the vacation renter is after the cheapest car they can get. Older designs such as the Impala Limited, Captiva etc, which rent for a little more, can subsidize the loss leaders down at the low end.

    As car people, we like to try the latest and greatest when renting a car for business of pleasure, so sure its a kick in the pants to get an older product that we’ve driven a few times before. Most folks are just happy to have ‘Car – Medium Size $19.95/day’.

    • 0 avatar
      84Cressida

      Rental car companies actually make LOTS of money off of the cars themselves. Think about it. They buy a $25K car for $18K (this is an example, they get substantial discounts for bulk buying), keep it for anywhere for a year to 24 months, can demand any rate it that they want during that time (Impalas usually go for $30/day, but if we’re short on cars, that price doubles), get 30,000 miles on it and still profit from the rest of it while they sell it. All they ever do is oil changes and occasionally tires if they’re worn out while still in service.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    As a data point, I’d like to add that Impalas are ALL OVER the place in Indiana (Indy and Fort Wayne). Both the 2000-2005 generation, and this 2006+ gen. The older more used ones are driven by more blue collar and urban drivers, along with college kids (same holds true for all other w bodies). The newer ones are also driven by a wide range of people: old folks, middle age people, you name it. Judging by sales figures, a lot of the newer Impalas may have been bought as 1 year old used cars (ex-rentals). They are incredible bang for the buck as a family car. Huge trunk, comfort for highway trips, powerful v6. All for the price of a similar-aged Corolla. You just have to ignore the awful resale values.

  • avatar
    84Cressida

    Nobody that works at a rental car company is looking forward to this. At all.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Why? Do your customers not like them or do you hate having to deal with W-body Impalas all day instead of other cars?

      What vehicles do you prefer? I don’t know much about the rental car industry so I’m interested.

      • 0 avatar
        84Cressida

        I wouldn’t hate them so much if the seats were a little better and GM would be bothered to put Bluetooth audio in them. The one thing I do like about them is the fact that due to their age they aren’t like almost every other American car today that is bloated and heavy, and unlike most cars today they have actual carpet in them and are ridiculously easy to clean. Looks-wise, it’s a lot better looking to me than the ’14, but the ’14 is 2093593403902 times the car. Any Impala beats the living snot out of the 200/Avenger. Those are truly the worst.

        The fact of the matter, though, is that not many people who get one like them, unless they’re old or they need to carry a lot of stuff in the trunk. Some are indifferent, granted, but most don’t have very many positive things to say, save the occasional “it was pretty smooth on the road”. We make it routine to ask how the renters like the car after they return it. Usually the complaints stem from those savvy enough to know that the car is ancient (and that’s a lot more common than one would think), to those who get “stuck” with one all the time due to them being so common, to the seats not being comfortable (huge complaint), no rear legroom (uncompetitive compared to newer entries) and the aforementioned Bluetooth. Now, some who have had the new car simply won’t take the old car.

        Hell, the Impala LTZ’s with “leather” have all vinyl for the back seats. GM was too cheap to stay consistent.

        The Malibu, aside from the looks and legroom, is a much more enjoyable car to drive and spend time in, and people actually like those. I don’t agree with anybody who says the old Malibu was better than the new one, it certainly wasn’t.

        The Cruze is also a lot more car than the W Impala and I have no problem driving those if I do an employee rental.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          I always dread getting an Optima or Sonata. They always feel like they are going to fall apart. Such terrible suspensions.

          • 0 avatar
            84Cressida

            I don’t particularly care for them one way or another and agree with you that they do not handle bumps well. I hate Kia’s radio display that is always washed out by the sun, no matter what. They use dim red lighting that looks old to begin with, and the sun will instantly wipe it away from sight. The Optima has it and the old Forte does, don’t know about the new one.

            Hyundais have a blue display that is easier to see. I think the Elantra is a nicer car in some ways than the Sonata. The Hyundais are hugely popular and requested due to having XM radio.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          ” I don’t agree with anybody who says the old Malibu was better than the new one, it certainly wasn’t.”

          I got a 2012 Malibu LTZ rental a couple of times this year and I’m telling you that was a fun, fast and enjoyable car. I haven’t had a new one yet, but it’s got a long way to go to be better then the ’12. Truly Chevy’s best kept secret, which is really dumb when you’re trying to sell cars

        • 0 avatar
          Power6

          The LTZ does have bluetooth. I only have made calls on it so don’t know about streaming audio.

          I pretty much love the 3.6 6-speed combo and the suspension set up is decent ride handling compromise so this car does have you thinking “isn’t this all you really need?” despite all it lacks compared to any theoretical competitor.

          Who cares if the rear seat is vinyl, the leather up front isn’t any nicer!

          The Impala drives nice and operates easy and I like that. More than I can say for the Ford Edge I had in Philly a few weeks ago, slow acting power train and infuriating touch “buttons” all over the dash I am thinking that is what some consider “better”.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Power-

            Did you have the 3.5 or 2.0T Edge? I think the biggest issue is that 6-speed Ford/GM unit. Its lazy in many applications.

            Even as a Ford guy, I hate the haptic feedback “buttons” they have put on everything above the C-platform vehicles. This comes from someone who loves MFT after being a unpaid 3 year beta tester.

            The hazard button on the Edge and Explorer, is in the worst possible spot EVER. If you rest your hand on the MFT shelf, you will press it. I wish I could retrofit my 2010 MKT with the MFT screen and multitude of options while keeping its traditional buttons.

          • 0 avatar
            VelocityRed3

            I just went from the ATL to the Tampa area in a LTZ from Enterprise. (I had originally reserved an 200, but no bluetooth prompted that upgrade). I can’t speak to streaming audio as I never got that feature working but tethered my iPhone 4 (running IOS 7.1… yeah I know) sounded pretty damn good. I made a point of mentioning that the sound quality(but not volume output) was better than the 900 dollar Pioneer HU I have in my own vehicle. Now I have some 4G of music/podcasts & it took forever for the MyLink radio to index that EACH time the car was turned on but album art & full display of titles was there (when present). I did not load my address book into the rental car, but caller ID worked for known incoming calls.

            As for the car itself, I spent about 45 minutes acquainting myself with the radio, seat controls, car info (read cruise & mileage indicators) while still at the Enterprise lot. I thought this was too long, but maybe I’m gettin old. LOL

            Once me & the seat came to an understanding (which I never could in my ex’es 2011 LaCrosse) it was an enjoyable if uneventful ride. This was a 4-cyl so it hunted at times. Both coming & going with the cruise at aboaut 80 it just, almost, could not make it with a full tank of gas. I think 23 was the indicated mileage. If I was buying a new car, one of these in dark blue with a more powerful motor & sunroof would definitely be on the short list. Kudos Chevrolet.

          • 0 avatar
            Power6

            @bball40dtw

            It was the 3.5. I would agree it has to be the trans. I drove a friends new Honda Pilot recently and it seemed similarly lethargic…not sure if it is MPG tuning or whatever, I thought those days were over and drivability was back!

  • avatar
    TW5

    W-Body Impala : US Rental Car Industry

    as

    Potato : Ireland

  • avatar
    areader

    Thanks to comments by Zackman and J. Baruth, I bought a ’12 Impala LS about 10 months ago. I wanted transportation that was reliable and economical, and I got it. I routinely get 35.x mpg on the interstate moving at 70-75 mph. Cranked it up to 75-80 this past week and my mileage plunged to 34.x. Mine is an Enterprise tradein that had 13k+ when I got it. A white LS with bluetooth which I never use. We often read that people buy Toyotas because they want reliable and cheap transportation. My other vehicle is a 1-ton Express, so maybe I’m just easy to please. I’d be interested to know what people drive that makes the Impala so unpleasant that isn’t a luxury car.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      My problem with the Impala is refinement. Compare the suspension with an Accord, a Charger, or a ’14 Impala… it’s crashier and wallowier at the same time. Compare the dash and upholstery materials with anything introduced after 2008 and they feel cheap and nasty.

      Reliable, economical, but I’d be annoyed every time I drove it by the lack of refinement in a modern car. If I paid $2000 for a used-up ’07 model I’d feel better about it.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Why do they bother to keep that expensive V6 in it when the rest of the car is a bargain-basement special that wasn’t competitive eight years ago? They should put in the cheap 2.5L four.

    And take the Chevy badge off; every one of these horrible things sold today hurts the brand.

  • avatar
    chicagoland

    These beasts are good for small police agencies, that cover small areas. Such as Colleges, Military Bases, Gov’t facilities, and small suburbs.

    There is no need for ‘hot pursuit’, and the cars mostly sit and idle. So why waste a an Explorer or V8 Charger/Tahoe for that light duty? It saves taxpayer $$ to have these ‘ancient’ cars used for such duty.

    Eventually the tooling for new design Impala will come down, then everyone can complain about how ‘ancient’ that car is.


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