By on October 22, 2013

 

 

gmdiesel_r

 

Chevrolet will not be the sole brand in GM’s stable to offer a diesel passenger car. According to reports, Buick is next up for a diesel engine. It’s not known which Buick would get an oil burner but the likely candidate is the Verano, which shares a platform with Chevy’s Cruze, which is now available with a four cylinder turbo diesel in the U.S. The Opel Astra, even more closely related to the Verano, already offers a 1.9 liter CTDI diesel in Europe.

The European companies that Buick sees at its competitors are increasing the number of their vehicles offered in the U.S. with diesel power as more consumers look for better fuel economy.

While Buick is looking of ways to improve the fuel economy of the Verano with a diesel, the brand is considering options for what will likely be a more powerful of the Encore. While the company sold more than 3,200 of the small crossovers in September, according to GM sources the primary reason why people who had shopped the Encore didn’t buy it was because of a lack of power. The only available engine in the Encore is GM’s  1.4 liter turbocharged four cylinder petrol engine that puts out 138 horsepower. The GM Ecotec 2.0 and 2.4 liter engines used in other Buick models won’t fit in the Encore’s engine compartment so GM will likely use their new 1.6 liter four.

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38 Comments on “Buick Will Likely Offer Diesel Verano, Considering More Powerful Encore...”


  • avatar
    mike89

    Like with the US Cruze, the diesel engine on the Astra is a Fiat engine.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JTD_engine

  • avatar
    Mirko Reinhardt

    “The Opel Astra, even more closely related to the Verano, already offers a 1.9 liter CTDI diesel in Europe.”
    The last Opel Astra with a 1.9L diesel was probably made in 2010. (last-generation Astra H)
    Current model “Astra J” diesel options are:
    •Fiat 1.3L (A13DTE)
    •Isuzu 1.7L in three power levels (A17DTE, A17DTC, A17DTR)
    •Fiat 2.0L in single and twin turbo versions (A20DTH, A20DTR)

  • avatar
    jmo

    I will totally be cross shopping a diesel Verano and the new GTD.

  • avatar
    doctor olds

    Why the cutaway of a spark ignition V6? Verano would likely get the same 2.0L 4 cylinder engine as the 55 MPG Cruze. I’d like to see it in the Encore.
    http://green.autoblog.com/2013/09/05/chevy-cruze-diesel-goes-on-54-7-mpg-cross-canada-journey/

  • avatar
    NormSV650

    I’m enjoying my Turbo Verano with 6-speed seeing 39 mpg on a tank this past summer driving the speed limit. The engine isn’t even working at 70 mph and 2,000 rpms with big 18″ wheels and 235mm rubber, not economical. Plus the Trifecta Tune yields almost double the horsepower of the similar size 2.0T diesel. The added cost of a diesel couldn’t outway any improvement in fuel economy.

    My Encore with AWD just continues to knock my socks off. With o ly 3,000 break-in miles it also saw 39 mpg on one tank mostly highway. The handling and braking is more than most need to commute. I have no problem throwing passengers and contents when the road starts to twist. It also received a Trifecta Tune which works the transmission too. It really wakes up the car spooling the turbo sooner. The iron block is a little thrash like my old iron block Saab’s but the transmission from the factory is spot on almost knowing what your next move is. I love the fact that the trans mission pulling to a stop doesn’t require peal pressure adjustments to slow. It is very intuitive. But a Trifecta tuned 2.0T might have me keeping to purchase after lease.

    • 0 avatar
      thornmark

      CR got 23 mpg in their tested Encore and it was dreadfully slow, just about slowest in its class – 0-60 in 11 sec! – even w/ the relatively poor fuel economy.

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        Alex Dykes review here got 32 mpg….with AWD. With more miles on the clock it could be the most efficient, AWD car.

        http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2013/04/review-2013-buick-encore-video/

        This backs up Real World driving on the BuickForums with most seeing mid-30′s as the miles add on.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    Why wouldn’t the Verano get the 2.0-liter turbodiesel that is now available on the 2014 Cruze? After all, the Verano and Cruze do share the Delta II platform, so everything would probably fit in just fine….

  • avatar
    thornmark

    GM must be getting REALLY desperate for sales, I got this email:

    GM Limited-Time Offer on select vehicles!

    Now is the perfect time to save on an eligible, new 2013 or 2014 Chevrolet, Cadillac, Buick or GMC vehicle.

    Register with the Costco Auto Program to receive an Authorization Number and PIN to purchase an eligible model, Oct. 15, 2013, through Jan. 2, 2014, at a participating dealership and receive:

    • GM Supplier and Friends Pricing

    • All publicly available manufacturer rebates and incentives

    Plus, receive a $500 Costco Cash Card for completing a Costco Auto Program member satisfaction survey after purchase.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    btw, Norm is spreading his manure at other sites. This owner/reviewer is getting shy of 24 mpg in his Verano Turbo, while Norm claims more than 50% more:
    http://www.autosavant.com/2013/09/18/long-term-test-2013-buick-verano-turbo-update-1/

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      And it matches ERA combined? Is that the worst fuel economy testing you could find? Look for Alex Dukes’ review for a more through test on this website. Real world highway for the automatic transmission Turbo is slightly less on the BuickForums.com.

      Thornmark does like Turbo-4 power testing his Japanese 4 & 6 cylinders.

    • 0 avatar
      brettc

      Is Norm using US MPG or Imperial MPG? Seems like it might be the latter. I don’t know how else he could achieve such diesel-like fuel economy numbers with gas engines unless he drives 55 MPH on flat terrain 100% of the time.

      And jmo, let’s hope VW decides to bestow the GTD upon the North American market. As with anything VW, I’ll believe it when I see it for sale on a lot.

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        Yea, an imperial calculator made in China. All calculations made by hand as the car’s computer reads low.

        Alex got 32 mpg in an Encore including 0-60 mph, and photo shoot idling. Owners are pushing 40 mpg as the engine loosens up:

        http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2013/04/review-2013-buick-encore-video/

        Just under 40 mpg without driving the Encore like a economy car:

        http://buickforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=31839&page=2

        http://buickforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=29646&highlight=verano+turbo+mpg

        Turbo-4 and direct injection is leaving the Japanese V6 in the dust slowly and surely.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          “Turbo-4 and direct injection is leaving the Japanese V6 in the dust slowly and surely.”

          Well…maybe. The Chevy Cruze, for instance, is one of my favorite cars, but I’m a bit troubled at the long-term reliability of such a heavy car coupled with a minuscule 1.4-liter turbo four. Also, at some point we’re going to reach a point in which these engines are so small—and the cars on top of them are so heavy—that their fuel-economy ratings require unrealistic driving styles. That seems to be what is happening in much of Europe.

          • 0 avatar
            NormSV650

            What specifically in terms of durability? Engine wear happens during cold starts and high rpms. With GM’s Ecotec Turbos making full torque just below 2,000 rpms, same as other Turbo-4′s, they prove to be just as robust as turbo charged diesel engines that last longer than the car.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            “What specifically in terms of durability?”

            Turbochargers have very high thermal managment demands due to their inherent role in the exhaust system, as well as the extremely high rotational speeds of the turbine and impeller. Seals, bearings and rotating assemblies don’t typically last as long as the base engine hardware.

            Smaller displacement turbocharged engines also operate under higher boost pressures which require precise and reliable controls. Failures in this area can cause catastrophic engine damage quite quickly.

          • 0 avatar
            NormSV650

            All that durability on blended, not full synthetic, motor oil changed at 7,500 miles. Got to love technology!

          • 0 avatar
            NormSV650

            First Cruze to 100K:

            http://www.cruzetalk.com/forum/9-chevrolet-cruze-general-discussion-forum/12817-100k-miles-still-efficient.html

          • 0 avatar
            doctor olds

            No reason to fear the durability of any GM powertrain. They are fully covered for 5 year/100,000 mile warranties. The design quality philosophy is straightforward- “GM Powertrains Do Not Fail”.

            There is no fundamental reason that a small boosted engine has to fail prematurely, before at least 150,000 miles. Designs must be robust, may require premium materials. Consider the dohc V6 with four times the opportunity for a cam failure as a pushrod engine. Yet,we don’t fear them because their designs are generally robust and have very low failure rates.

            A well designed engine can easily last the life of the vehicle, boosted or not.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “Consider the dohc V6 with four times the opportunity for a cam failure as a pushrod engine. Yet,we don’t fear them”

            Maybe you don’t fear them but some of us might :)

            GM has at least in my lifetime been a company that built mostly great powertrains, but I would have slept much better if low end torque OHVs like 3800 had continued in some way to be offered in their cars. I know American OHC technology can work just as well as evidenced by the Ford Modular V8 and whatnot but its just not what I prefer.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            @28-cars:

            I’m with you.

            2 valves/cylinder, one camshaft, over 3.0L, and iron block is how I like my GM vehicles.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I haven’t driven anything that new and turbo so I have to reserve judgement. The only issue I take with it (turbo vs NA V6) is it shouldn’t be used as a crutch in place of a V6 which seems to be how they are being used in most cars.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I mostly agree with this. I like the turbocharged engine as a performance or premium option above a regular V6.

  • avatar
    NormSV650

    The Encore and Verano only are offered with 18″ wheels mind you.

  • avatar
    gasser

    Why doesn’t GM put the new 2.5 four cylinder from the 2014 Malibu into the Verano/ for a real justification of its price bump over the Cruze??

  • avatar
    Bimmer

    Wouldn’t it make more sense to stick a diesel into Regal, since it’s Euro twin Insignia is available with the same diesel?

  • avatar
    doctor olds

    The Cruze is already certified. Verano is similar enough to use some, likely all of that work. Regal would be more involved (time/$) to certify.

    Regal and Malibu are similar enough to benefit in the same way, but either carline would be a new certification program compared to Verano.

    The big challenge in America is compliance with tough diesel emissions standards, with onboard urea injection and sophisticated control algorithms necessary to make it all work. Once you get the design you have to conduct a certification process that requires many thousands of miles and careful monitoring.

    Diesels are more expensive to start with, and the after treatment adds additional cost. The real plus of today’s diesels is low end torque for great drive away. In a casual “diagonal slice” meeting, GM’s Global Powertrain Engineering VP once made the statement that diesels were viewed as performance vehicles in Europe. It did not make much sense to me then, but After watching the Lemans winning Peugeot diesel accelerate away in the night at the Sebring 12 hours quietly and with otherworldly acceleration, I understood what he meant. Torque, after all, is what we feel,the attribute we measure so as to calculate horsepower.


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