By on August 28, 2013

porschead

Your humble E-I-C is a fairly committed capitalist tool, in pretty much all senses of the phrase, but I’m also a fairly ardent reader of left-leaning publications and books. This month’s Adbusters throws a shout out to Porsche by reprinting a recent Cayman ad and superimposing a description of narcissistic personality disorder on it. To be fair, the first stereotype regarding Porsche owners probably sprang into existence when the first customer for the Gmund coupe drove it past his neighbor on the way home from taking delivery, but it’s easy to argue that the company’s actions of the past fifteen years have done a lot to make those stereotypes more true than ever.


Porsche fans and owners have always battled the stereotype of the P-car driver as a pathetic little prick hiding behind the pricetag and alleged superiority of his hilariously overpriced German status symbol. For much of the first fifty years that Porsche was in business, however, the company’s defenders could offer the same milled-stainless rebuttal that aficionados of Rolex watches, PRS guitars, Huntsman suits, and Pelikan pens could use: yeah, the stuff costs more money than anybody should pay, and yeah the product may be the choice of various unlovely and/or reprehensible individuals, but it’s engineered and built to a superior standard. The product has merit apart from the social message it sends. Oftentimes that’s a valid defense. I was recently taken to task by a member of the B&B for bragging about my PRS Private Stock guitars, and I’ll admit that he had a point, but if you played a PRS-PS guitar with no markings on it you’d immediately notice that it’s made to a standard that you don’t get anywhere else. Res ipsa loquitur and all that, homie.

(That same member of the B&B also implied I was a fan of Joe Bonnamassa. A repeat of that allegation by him or anyone else will earn that individual the title of First Member Of Our August Commenting Community To Be Banned Under The New Regime, by the way, as will the use of the phrase “Black Rock” without concurrent use of the name “Vernon Reid”.)

Say what you want about the yuppie Carrera explosion of the Eighties, but those 3.2-liter aircooled cars were built to last indefinitely. They don’t rust and although they are far from trouble-free, they last and last and last. That statement could be applied to most Porsches built before 1997, even the 944 and its descendants. There are a lot of 150,000-mile cars out there with numbers on the door at PCA meets. The normally-aspirated eight-valve 944 continues to be represented in staggering numbers in almost all forms of club racing, and it’s not just because people love them.

That was then, and this is now. The thousand injuries of water-cooled Porsche I have borne the best I can, and others have done the same, but the arrival of the Cayenne and Panamera made it absolutely plain that the company was no longer interested in creating durable and venerable products. The endless bleating by the “Stuttgart syndrome” crowd about how the manufacture of two-ton glandular-dysfunction blob-mobiles was absolutely essential to maintaining Porsche’s independence has been hilariously deconstructed by the fact that Porsche’s stewards used the money for fiscal adventurism even as they claimed to have pockets too empty to create a proper four-cylinder entry-level car. The company is now half-owned by Volkswagen, making the Cayenne, Pajun, and Panamera approximately as necessary to the company’s plans as would be a Bugatti medium-duty pickup.

The days when Porsche ran advertisements like this:

Porsche_944_Turbo_Ad

are long gone. Today it is assumed that the prospective buyer is a moneyed moron looking to attach his image to, er, “carve his niche” with, the most expensive Porsche he can afford. The merits of the product, where discussed, are done so nebulously. The important thing is that the car look like a Porsche and that it incur feeling of envy and/or hatred in one’s peers. The modern cars might blow their engines or nav screens 30,000 miles into the ownership process, but what customer would keep the car that long.

I will forever cherish a conversation I had on Facebook with PCNA’s Communications Manager a few years ago. I was discussing my frustration with the company’s direction when the fellow, upon learning that my newest Porsche was four years old, said something very snarky along the lines of “we’re not in the business of catering to the desires of used car buyers” or something like that. I cannot express how much pleasure it gave me to buy an Audi S5 instead of a 911 when the time came to do so. I guarantee that you can show up at a PRS event with a used Private Stock — hell, a used SE model — and you won’t hear any shit like that from Paul Reed Smith, because he’s smart enough to know that it’s commercial suicide for a company to turn their back on people who bought their last guitar/car/watch four years ago. Ferrari sure as hell doesn’t treat their clients that way.

It amounts to the Hublot-ization of a brand that should know better. The market will eventually teach Porsche the error of its current ways, but when you build up fifty years’ worth of goodwill it takes a lot time to fritter it all away. Even when that happens, the company will certainly have new customers. Consider the BRIC and the MIST and the Saudi states. It’s a supply of narcissists deeper than the oil shale in Canada and twice as profitable, and the best news is this: you can burn the Porsche customer base again and again, but the supply of idiots is truly abiotic. You can probably never burn it up.

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92 Comments on “Porsche Makes The Scene At Adbusters, Linked To A Mental Illness...”


  • avatar
    brokeguy

    With this post it’s official. TTAC is BACK BABY!

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      It’s a beautiful thing, even if buying a new Audi instead of a Porsche out of spite is like buying a LandCruiser instead of a Lexus to show your displeasure to Toyota.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Yep.

      Jack’s article, ‘The Watery Big Bang…,’ which is the novel to this chapter, is literally one of “those” rare essays that provides me reassurance that it is possible that it is the majority (or at least large plurality) of the rest of the world that has gone insane, rather than I.

      That essay conveys how I feel about the state of our culture – and the culture of consumerism of much of the rest of the world, for that matter – with such precision, that it qualifies’as being “uncanny.”

  • avatar
    April

    It’s actually called the DSM-5 now.

  • avatar
    jmo

    “The modern cars might blow their engines or nav screens 30,000 miles into the ownership process, but what customer would keep the car that long. ”

    Do you have some data to back up those claims? Sorry, it’s just one of my pet peeves when the B&B wildly overstimate how reliable or unreliable a given car might be.

  • avatar
    romanjetfighter

    If the car sells on the point that it’s fashionable, and with the latest gadgets, when you have an older version, it’s stigmatized because the newer version will be better in every meaningful way. If the car sells because it’s engineered well, then its allure lasts, because engineering and technical excellence is timeless.

    Either way, the snark was uncalled for. People who work at Porsche should have pride in the great product that they build, not pride in how wealthy and exclusive their customer base is.

    I just hate how Porsche has prostituted the 911 by re-skinning the ’911 look’ onto Touaregs and Tiguans.

  • avatar
    bball40dtw

    They have a different communications manager now, right?

  • avatar
    seth4man

    Jack – I wonder if you got the recent email questionnaire from Porsche that I did. It was an EXTREMELY long survey / questionnaire about Porsche cars.

    To sum up a good 45 minutes of ratings, the entire thing was focused on how I felt, how other people felt, how I thought other people felt, how I thought other people would perceive me, etc., driving a porsche.

    All the answers were “I feel successful driving a porsche” or “wealthy” or “important” etc. The idea that somebody would buy a porsche because – gee – it’s fun to drive was an afterthought to the survey. And if that doesn’t tell you where the car manufacturer’s head is at, I don’t know what would.

    But don’t be sad, Porsche is only one of two german car companies completely selling themselves out for the sake of style and image. When was the last time BMW made a decent car? The E90 which was introduced 8 years ago?

    • 0 avatar
      jaybird124

      Seth I couldn’t agree more! I’ve grown up enjoying BMW’s like Jack does Porsche. The EXACT same thing is happened to them and it’s made me all but abandon the brand. And you’re right the E90 was the last great car they made, especially the 328 and M3.
      I can only hope some company will see the gap and fill it. Great products are certainly starting to be made in other industries where consumers are showing that craftsmanship and ‘legacy of quality’ is truly valued.

      Jack, it would be interesting to see articles where you think a car company is or could fill the shoes of craftsmanship or a true ‘sporting’ car.

      • 0 avatar
        David Walton

        Re: the final sentence – What about Alfa Romeo?

      • 0 avatar
        jeffzekas

        Went to the BMW dealer- the snobbery was unbearable- glad my youngest son is selling his 3-series and buying a Ford truck!

      • 0 avatar
        racer-esq.

        “Jack, it would be interesting to see articles where you think a car company is or could fill the shoes of craftsmanship or a true ‘sporting’ car.”

        The Corvette, Miata, even the FR-S and Genesis Coupe will wear much better than anything German. And are massively “sporting”. “Craftsmanship” is a BS term. We’re not talking about Morgans. It comes down to design, engineering and development. Modern German cars are crap from the CAD files forward. The IMS failure in Porsches comes from sh*tty design and development, not some error by a “craftsman”. Modern Japanese and American cars are overbuilt and highly tested, and are still designed to be taken apart and repaired. Modern German cars are not. Show me an American or Japanese car where you cannot access the engine from above. Where the power steering fluid is as hard to check as with Jack’s Boxster.

        The only question is whether German car buyers can get over their narcissistic personality disorder and consider a Corvette, Miata, Genesis Coupe or FR-S.

        • 0 avatar
          Nicholas Weaver

          Well, part of the problem Porsche faces is that even bog standard cars are just so good on the handling front!

          A 4-banger, 170hp rental Camry laps Summit Point Shenandoah in 1:54. Yes, a 5 liter Mustang will be 9 seconds a lap faster (that’s a whopping 8% faster), and a showroom fresh Porsche might be even a few percent better than that…

          But still, that means you’re talking quadruple or quintuple the price, for 15% better performance on the track compared with a no-option, rental car special, mass market family sedan, made by the car company which specializes in boring appliance-cars designed for people who actually hate cars!.

          Which means if you want fun, connected etc with your performance, you can get near (or more?) levels of fun in the cars you mentioned, or a used S2000, or a WRX, or a Mustang, or a Z-car, or wait for the next Mustang, or… The choices are immense, and all for a fraction of the cost.

          Thus Porsche really is left with “Badge Snob” (if you are rude) or “lifestyle” as their big selling point, because the performance delta in the real world (and even the track) is remarkably small for what you pay.

        • 0 avatar
          Landcrusher

          There is actually still room for craftsmanship in modern car building even if its nothing more than quality control.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      While I share your outlook that one ought to buy a Porsche based on it’s performance merits, customers can buy “fun to drive” any number of places and for tens of thousands less. Snob appeal is something they can really take to the bank.

      • 0 avatar
        setsail26

        Just as one can buy a perfectly effective sweater for less than some of Jack’s favorites, or a functional bookshelf that doesn’t cost four figures. Fun is subjective. Almost everyone is a snob about something, or everything we need could be purchesed from Walmart and we would all live in 800 square foot apartments. I could argue that anyone that spends more than 3 bucks for a watch is a snob, since that will tell time as well as any Rolex. Seems to me the real definition of snob is someone who buys something more expensive or flashier than you.

        • 0 avatar
          Landcrusher

          Slow down, dude. Anymore wisdom and you’ll get labeled as a reactionary hatemonger. :)

        • 0 avatar
          lzaffuto

          The definition of a snob is someone that thinks buying a product that is more expensive or flashier than what others have makes them a superior *person* or *human being* than other people. In other words, I have no problem with someone that buys a Rolex because they think it is a superior watch to my Timex. I have no problem with someone that buys a Porsche because they think it is a superior car than my Miata. But someone that feels like I am the rabble and scum of the earth because they own a Porsche and I own a Miata is a (insert favorite expletive here).

          • 0 avatar
            Landcrusher

            That’s one of the definitions. Setsail was not incorrect.

            The issue I have with what you are saying is that people mostly make statements about the big spenders as if all, almost all, or most people who have the expensive toys are the type of snob you are defining. The reality is that those types are the minority. Most owners of nice things just want to have nice things or, even though they may want to show off, they don’t look down on people with lesser stuff just because they don’t have nice toys.

            There are many times fewer people as you describe as there are people who prejudge owners of nice things and are sure they are (insert favorite expletive here) just because they spent a lot extra for a little fanciness. IOW, they rebuff the big spender because they judge them to be an inferior person. That’s another definition of snob, btw.

          • 0 avatar
            burgersandbeer

            Nicely put Landcrusher.

    • 0 avatar
      David Walton

      I’ve heard this survey mentioned several times (on here and on forums), but I didn’t receive one myself.

      The conclusions to be drawn from the questions are a bit worrisome…

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    Not many truths here behind the suppositions. Take a Cayman and long term test it against Camry SE. Then we can make objective assessments!

  • avatar
    GS 455

    Nothing says true luxury like having to meet DSM-5 criteria in order to own it.

  • avatar
    setsail26

    Jack, you made me sign up just to post a reply to this. The going on and on about Porsche is getting old. There is no comparison between them and the Hublot Big Bang. Those were shit, are shit, and always will be shit, made just to look cool out of cheap components. And mentioning Rolex as super high end is a bit iffy, they have a great image but cost about twice as much as similary well made watches. Porsches may not be as rock solid as they used to be (but what German cars are?), but they are probaly as reliable as ever and still drive better than their competition. Ferrari and Porsche are not in the same universe, and cannot be compared. You seem to enjoy your throw-away boxster.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      Actually, I would trade my throw-away Boxster for a throw-away Z06 in a moment. If you have one, let’s swap.

      • 0 avatar
        jaybird124

        Z06 definitely FTW.

        Not a huge Leno fan, but he had an interesting comment on the Z06 vs his Porsche Carrera GT (which I do love). Talked about how much more durable and reliable the Vette was while still providing incredible performance at a fraction the cost.

    • 0 avatar
      jeffzekas

      I felt the same way until the IMS bearing incident with my son.

      • 0 avatar
        jimbob457

        @jeffzekas
        My condolences on your loss. I am currently playing IMS roulette with an old 996 built before February 2001. Stuttgart claims its lifetime failure rate to be a normal 1-2%. Certainly, they would not lie, would they? Do you happen to recall if your afflicted Porsche was built before or after February 2001?

  • avatar
    Bocatrip

    If you happen to go on the more popular Porsche forums, there are quite a number of issues with current models that some Porsche enthusiasts do not hesitate to discuss. There is a price for Porsche ownership and it’s not cheap. There might be a point that some dedicated owners for Porsche may not choose to keep their cars beyond the warranty period due to excessive maintenance cost. Then again as discussed earlier, there are plenty of new owner replacements ready and willing for the “Porsche Experience”.

  • avatar
    sfdennis1

    Wanted to add my voice to those in acknowledgement of TTAC’s editorial and content upgrade. Forsaking the (previously frequent) outright bias and oft-used inflammatory provocation, while adding more balance and thoughful analysis has made a noticeable difference in this user’s experience of TTAC. Visiting TTAC no longer feels like an abusive relationship. Kudos.

    This article is a good example of what you do best, Mr. Baruth…holding the mirror up to an organization, a situation, and/or yourself.

    With no B.S., no “collateral damage causing” insults or slurs, and no manipulative trolling, your intelligent perceptions and take-no-prisoners honesty can be appreciated clearly.

  • avatar
    deanst

    Doesn’t VW own 100% of porsche now?

  • avatar
    stuntmonkey

    Actually, yes, come to think of it, I do miss the old ads that used to run in the buff books. They actually spoke something about the merits of the car

  • avatar
    Grahambo

    Jack, Another fantastic article and not just because it touches on Porsches (especially 944s) and guitars. I have tremendous respect for PRS, the company, and Paul Reed Smith, the man, but have not been able to truly connect with either of the two PRSI I’ve owned the way I have with solidbody Rickenbackers and certain Fenders. Although PRS’s can be ridiculously expensive, I think they represent great inherent value at every step of the ladder, esp. compared to many Gibsons (does anyone actually buy those limited edition Les Pauls for $7K-25K)? Further to your comment about the way that the SE owners would be treated at a PRS event, the SE guitars themselves represent a fabulous value and I admire PRS/Paul’s commitment to making sure even their very bottom end guitars are well made and solid all-around. Bringing this back to cars, I see Porsche as sort of the equivalent to Gibson and now suffers from many of the same flaws, as touched upon above. It’s all about the “lifestyle” and extracting as much cash as they can from the starry-eyed. (Although who can blame them, I suppose?) They both still make some decent products, but it’s nowhere like it used to be in terms of overall durability or quality for either.

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    Well, there’s lots that goes into this. I had a very good friend who bought, new, a 911 SC in the late 1980s. He loved the car, and used to complain about the fact that people would pull out in front of him, underestimating how rapidly the car could accelerate. If memory serves, this car did 0-60 in about 7 seconds, maybe a bit less.

    My point is this: today’s roads are not any faster than those of 30 years ago (well, maybe a little, with the demise of the national 55 mph speed limit). However, today’s cars are much, much faster and more capable. You don’t have to spend Porsche money today to buy Porsche performance circa 1987. Just about any shlub can do it.

    So, the problem is that, while today’s Porsches and other expensive cars offer tremendous performance, their owners have little opportunity to exploit it on public roads. Many lesser cars can reach the limits of most public roads (assuming sanity of the driver). So, why buy a Porsche?

    If the incremental improvement in the driving experience isn’t usable, what’s left is the status/envy generating power of the vehicle.

    That wasn’t true 30 years ago. In those days, one had to spend Porsche money to get the Porsche experience . . . and that experience was mostly available on public roads.

    Today? Not so much, I think.

    All that said, even as a non-Porsche owner, I agree with you that the Cayenne and Panamera are travesties.

    • 0 avatar
      jimbob457

      DC Bruce, your observations are spot on. Thirty some years ago, I owned a ’67 911. It was a blast to drive at 90 to 120 mph on almost any road. Ordinary cars of the time were nothing in comparison. I once averaged over 90 mph on a winding foothill road between Study Butte and Alpine, Texas just for fun.

      I now own a 996 Cabrio and a refurbished 14 year old Panther with 28k miles and some suspension modifications. The old Panther is actually almost as good as an interstate cruiser up to 85 to 90 mph. It cost about one-fourth as much as the Porsche. Sure, the 996 top ends at over 170 mph, but you can’t really use most of the extra speed and handling.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      There’s more to a Porsche than top-speed. A Corolla will not handle the same as a Cayman. But I agree with you in that there isn’t much opportunity to harness the insane specifications of today’s supercars, and even basic cars have specifications that are mostly in excess.

      • 0 avatar
        Preludacris

        I’ll second this.
        A Kia Forte I rented recently in Denver was able to go – well, let’s just say it was as fast as I needed it to be.
        I also owned a completely clapped-out 1990 Integra with nearly 450,000 km on the clock, and once took up to 180 km/h.
        If you NEED to go that fast, good luck with your emergency!

    • 0 avatar
      PenguinBoy

      @DC Bruce
      Excellent post!

      Another point – Porsche’s old business model of selling expensive enthusiast cars was unsustainable – IIRC, they just about went out of business in the early ’90s recession. As I see it the problems with their old model were:
      1) There aren’t that many enthusiasts.
      2) There are even fewer enthusiasts with the means to buy a 911.
      3) An air cooled 911 has enough lasting appeal that it is in danger of becoming a “forever” car (like Jacks), so the well heeled enthusiast may only buy one, and keep it for a very long time.

      I don’t much care for the Cayenne (“the Porsche of Minivans”) or Panamera myself – but they make a lot of sense from a commercial perspective, as does introducing a lower cost model (Boxster / Cayman) that is well within reach of most professional people. Off the top of my head, I can think of 3 Porsches in my office – two Cayennes and a Boxster – no 911s.

      The only problem I can see with their current approach is now that the vehicles are no longer that “special”, in the long run they may eventually devalue their brand, much like Cadillac and Lincoln did in the ’60s and 70s…

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        Why is all this a surprise? Cadillac/ Lincoln luxury was scorned when all cars became luxury. Rugged/outdoorsy big SUVs were scorned when every car maker produced a CUV. I’m beginning to see a kind of mass self-loathing mentality cycle going on that says “If I can have it, it sucks. If I can’t have it, I want it” and it keeps repeating

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      The recent Top Gear episode where Mays reviewed the Singer 911 did a very good job, IMO, of capturing what made “old” Porsche great, and “new” Porsche not so much…

  • avatar
    el scotto

    For 40K which would I enjoy more? An air-cooled 911 or a Shelby Mustang? Oh, and both are red.

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    I’d never heard of Adbusters.

    What a glorious Glad-I’m-Old moment gave it to me.

    Adbuster ethos:

    Because I eat and defecate I am the apex of humanity.
    In your heart you know I’m right.
    Major credit cards accepted.

    • 0 avatar
      Monty

      It is one of the must-haves for the upper middle-class left-of-centre contingent of my son’s age group (25 – 40). It’s nothing more than a soapbox; ranting at the capitalist-corporate culture that, in the end, they will all belong to. But the magazine staff certainly are earnest.

      • 0 avatar
        Kenmore

        Mongrels like me will simply never understand why any scion of the fortunate classes would chastise the system that prevented them from being beaten, burned with cigarettes, raped in every orifice and addicted to heroin before they were sixteen.

        Were I one I’d have dropped to my knees every night and prayed “God bless Mommy, Daddy and the predatory capitalism that gave me this swell room. All to myself.”

    • 0 avatar

      COTD

    • 0 avatar
      racer-esq.

      What really undermines Adbusters (in many situations, not just this one) is that they have no understanding of their subject matter, they just make sloppy generalizations. “Hey unpaid intern, go find me a Porsche ad to parody.” Instead of mocking the Cayenne, or Panamera or Carrera 4 Cabriolet they choose the realest, most authentic sports car that Porsche sells. Nobody truly suffering from narcissistic personality disorder would be seen the “cheap” Porsche. Might as well be a 914.

  • avatar
    WaftableTorque

    Speaking of NPD, I found out about 4-5 years ago that I have it. I did a couple of self-diagnosis tests, and not only am I deeply narcissistic, but if I truly reflect on my life, I always have been. It has determined the things I buy, the friends I hang around, how I dress, and the careers I’ve chosen.

    Of course, having NPD isn’t my problem, it’s your problem. Deal with it. :p

  • avatar
    H Man

    You DO look a bit like Al Di Meola… Hmm.

    /G&L FTW

  • avatar
    azmtbkr81

    It sucks to see a much-loved company change course and abandon the principles, design, or engineering that were once so appealing to their customers. I’ve seen this happen again and again in the bicycle, hifi, and most recently the automotive industry. The older I get the more I realize that all good things truly must come to an end. It is time to find a new favorite car company Jack.

  • avatar
    jeffzekas

    Growing up in Santa Monica in the 60′s, I have seen ALL fast cars change from “enthusiast” cars into “gold chain status symbols”. Porsche drivers around here are all over-60 white guys driving 10mph under the speed limit!

  • avatar
    shelvis

    Joe Bonamassa tried to buy a Fender Super Champ from me. He arrived in a Lincoln Town Car wearing designer sweat pants. No lie. Or at least only slightly exagerated. You decide.
    Living the dream!

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    You mean this is real?

    http://i188.photobucket.com/albums/z256/jimbob1955_2007/bad%20day/boxster_zpsea18be6f.jpg

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    I’d trust a newer Boxter to hold together better than an old 928, but with that being said I wouldn’t doubt that older Porsches were “forever cars” if you took proper care of them and drove them casually, much like any car of the 80′s-90′s.

    These days if a company can’t revise a cars platform every 3 weeks then they have to take other measures to get other buyers, and sometimes those measures aren’t so pleasant.

    I feel that too many car companies have lost their way though, in the 80′s about every car had distinct styling and its branding was obvious (save for Asian cars and GMs clone force), today they all seek to build the grayest and most economical CUV.

  • avatar

    It’s Macan, not “Pajun”, but I guess it doesn’t matter!

  • avatar
    chuckrs

    jeffzekas

    Your son can find details of a class action settlement by Porsche for IMS failures on Gen 1 Boxsters and 911s using the 986 engine over at http://www.planet-9.com.

  • avatar
    The Heisenberg Cartel

    I got told I was buying a status car when I got my disposable BMW. My 4,000 dollar E46 with 268,000 miles on it. Heheh. Yeah I know it’s one of the “good generations”, but I imagine when it first replaced the e36 it, like all brand-new BMW generations, generated cries of “disposable” or “too computer-driven” or “BMW has lost it”.

    But more to the point, I would imagine (being too young and/or not a car junkie at the time to remember Porsche’s marketing in the early 2000s or late 1990s) that these cars have always been disposable, to some degree. Just as, I’m sure, my 323i was thought of back in the day. A better example, the first-generation ML-class, was the EPITOME of disposable car. Yet I can’t tell you how many examples of old MLs I see driving around the ghetto, military bases, or other places where people love old Euro cars en masse, with dents all over, glazed-yellow headlights, with chrome rims, etc. Same with early 2000s S, E and C classes.

    And don’t even get me started on Bangle-era BMWs with six-figure mileage, glazy headlights and (often) random dents.

    I suspect in 10-15 years I’ll be seeing Panameras in the same state of being regularly. I’m already starting to see old Cayennes in this state of being on a not-irregular basis. Worn out first gen Boxsters are a surprisingly common sight as well.

  • avatar
    Bocatrip

    Sorry, I meant handicap placards not stickers when I mentioned Porsche owners in SE Florida.

  • avatar
    SimRacingDan

    How much of your commentary is about IMS/RMS issues? The IMS bearing problem was definitely unforgivable, but now that it’s resolved in 2009+ models , would you have any concerns about owning one of them?

    I own a 2012 Miata and love it, but like so many have always dreamed of owning a Porsche, but I’m a driver-type, not a status-type. I’m in the process of testing a bunch of different metal, z06 included to see what really speaks to me. I love corners – acceleration… I need a certain amount, but no monster.

    I have to say I loved driving the boxster spyder – it felt like a more powerful Miata (with way worse visibility). My research has lead me to believe that a 2011 model would be a reasonably safe bet with the gremlins resolved… Am I wrong?

    The allure of having the engine behind me is strong. I don’t think I want an NSX, and I’ve found that with my Miata being a member of the local club and going on drives makes it much more fun to own and use. I haven’t met any Porsche club members yet, but I’m hoping they’re a similar crew… We’ll see. Cars and coffee doesn’t really appeal to me. I like to drive cars, not look at them. :)

  • avatar
    Nik-supercars

    I’m sure that there was a kind of misunderstanding between you two. I do not believe that someone in a big company (no matter if it’s porsche, ferrari or bentley) could be stupid enough to treat the customer in that way.
    http://www.supercarexperiences.com


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